136

See my code snippet below:

var list = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'];
var str = 'one two, one three, one four, one';
for ( var i = 0; i < list.length; i++)
{
     if (str.endsWith(list[i])
     {
         str = str.replace(list[i], 'finish')
     }
 }

I want to replace the last occurrence of the word one with the word finish in the string, what I have will not work because the replace method will only replace the first occurrence of it. Does anyone know how I can amend that snippet so that it only replaces the last instance of 'one'

16 Answers 16

154

Well, if the string really ends with the pattern, you could do this:

str = str.replace(new RegExp(list[i] + '$'), 'finish');
12
  • 2
    Good idea. Need to escape that string first (though not with her sample data, granted), which is non-trivial. :-( Apr 28, 2010 at 13:13
  • 1
    @Ruth no prob! @TJ yes, indeed that's true: Ruth if you end up with "words" you're looking for that include the special characters used for regular expressions, you'd need to "escape" those, which as TJ says is a little tricky (not impossible though).
    – Pointy
    Apr 28, 2010 at 21:56
  • 1
    what if you want to replace the last occurance of string1 inside string2? Mar 21, 2015 at 21:17
  • 1
    @SuperUberDuper well it is if you want to match something surrounded by "/" characters. There are two ways to make a RegExp instance: the constructor (new RegExp(string)), and the inline syntax (/something/). You don't need the "/" characters when you're using the RegExp constructor.
    – Pointy
    Mar 21, 2015 at 21:26
  • 3
    @TechLife you'd have to apply a transformation to the string to "protect" all the regex metacharacters with ` - things like +, *, ?`, parentheses, square brackets, maybe other things.
    – Pointy
    Apr 13, 2015 at 12:47
48

You can use String#lastIndexOf to find the last occurrence of the word, and then String#substring and concatenation to build the replacement string.

n = str.lastIndexOf(list[i]);
if (n >= 0 && n + list[i].length >= str.length) {
    str = str.substring(0, n) + "finish";
}

...or along those lines.

1
  • 2
    Another example: var nameSplit = item.name.lastIndexOf(", "); if (nameSplit != -1) item.name = item.name.substr(0, nameSplit) + " and "+ item.name.substr(nameSplit + 2);
    – Ben Gotow
    Feb 13, 2012 at 17:52
16

Not as elegant as the regex answers above, but easier to follow for the not-as-savvy among us:

function removeLastInstance(badtext, str) {
    var charpos = str.lastIndexOf(badtext);
    if (charpos<0) return str;
    ptone = str.substring(0,charpos);
    pttwo = str.substring(charpos+(badtext.length));
    return (ptone+pttwo);
}

I realize this is likely slower and more wasteful than the regex examples, but I think it might be helpful as an illustration of how string manipulations can be done. (It can also be condensed a bit, but again, I wanted each step to be clear.)

13

Here's a method that only uses splitting and joining. It's a little more readable so thought it was worth sharing:

    String.prototype.replaceLast = function (what, replacement) {
        var pcs = this.split(what);
        var lastPc = pcs.pop();
        return pcs.join(what) + replacement + lastPc;
    };
2
  • 3
    It works well, however it'll add replacement to start of the string if string doesnt include what at all. eg 'foo'.replaceLast('bar'); // 'barfoo' Nov 25, 2019 at 10:10
  • 1
    Please avoid prototype pollution.
    – sean
    Feb 23 at 13:19
11

Thought I'd answer here since this came up first in my Google search and there's no answer (outside of Matt's creative answer :)) that generically replaces the last occurrence of a string of characters when the text to replace might not be at the end of the string.

if (!String.prototype.replaceLast) {
    String.prototype.replaceLast = function(find, replace) {
        var index = this.lastIndexOf(find);

        if (index >= 0) {
            return this.substring(0, index) + replace + this.substring(index + find.length);
        }

        return this.toString();
    };
}

var str = 'one two, one three, one four, one';

// outputs: one two, one three, one four, finish
console.log(str.replaceLast('one', 'finish'));

// outputs: one two, one three, one four; one
console.log(str.replaceLast(',', ';'));
9

A simple answer without any regex would be:

str = str.substr(0, str.lastIndexOf(list[i])) + 'finish'
3
  • 2
    What if there is no occurence in the original string?
    – tomazahlin
    Sep 4, 2018 at 12:24
  • The most accepted answer returns the same result as mine! Here is the test result:
    – Tim Long
    Sep 10, 2018 at 14:01
  • Mine: > s = s.substr(0, s.lastIndexOf('d')) + 'finish' => 'finish' ... Theirs: > s = s.replace(new RegExp('d' + '$'), 'finish') => 'finish'
    – Tim Long
    Sep 10, 2018 at 14:13
6

I did not like any of the answers above and came up with the below

function isString(variable) { 
    return typeof (variable) === 'string'; 
}

function replaceLastOccurrenceInString(input, find, replaceWith) {
    if (!isString(input) || !isString(find) || !isString(replaceWith)) {
        // returns input on invalid arguments
        return input;
    }

    const lastIndex = input.lastIndexOf(find);
    if (lastIndex < 0) {
        return input;
    }

    return input.substr(0, lastIndex) + replaceWith + input.substr(lastIndex + find.length);
}

Usage:

const input = 'ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteen twenty';
const find = 'teen';
const replaceWith = 'teenhundred';

const output = replaceLastOccurrenceInString(input, find, replaceWith);
console.log(output);

// output: ten eleven twelve thirteen fourteen fifteen sixteen seventeen eighteen nineteenhundred twenty

Hope that helps!

3

If speed is important, use this:

/**
 * Replace last occurrence of a string with another string
 * x - the initial string
 * y - string to replace
 * z - string that will replace
 */
function replaceLast(x, y, z){
    var a = x.split("");
    var length = y.length;
    if(x.lastIndexOf(y) != -1) {
        for(var i = x.lastIndexOf(y); i < x.lastIndexOf(y) + length; i++) {
            if(i == x.lastIndexOf(y)) {
                a[i] = z;
            }
            else {
                delete a[i];
            }
        }
    }

    return a.join("");
}

It's faster than using RegExp.

3

Simple solution would be to use substring method. Since string is ending with list element, we can use string.length and calculate end index for substring without using lastIndexOf method

str = str.substring(0, str.length - list[i].length) + "finish"

2

Couldn't you just reverse the string and replace only the first occurrence of the reversed search pattern? I'm thinking . . .

var list = ['one', 'two', 'three', 'four'];
var str = 'one two, one three, one four, one';
for ( var i = 0; i < list.length; i++)
{
     if (str.endsWith(list[i])
     {
         var reversedHaystack = str.split('').reverse().join('');
         var reversedNeedle = list[i].split('').reverse().join('');

         reversedHaystack = reversedHaystack.replace(reversedNeedle, 'hsinif');
         str = reversedHaystack.split('').reverse().join('');
     }
 }
0

Old fashioned and big code but efficient as possible:

function replaceLast(origin,text){
    textLenght = text.length;
    originLen = origin.length
    if(textLenght == 0)
        return origin;

    start = originLen-textLenght;
    if(start < 0){
        return origin;
    }
    if(start == 0){
        return "";
    }
    for(i = start; i >= 0; i--){
        k = 0;
        while(origin[i+k] == text[k]){
            k++
            if(k == textLenght)
                break;
        }
        if(k == textLenght)
            break;
    }
    //not founded
    if(k != textLenght)
        return origin;

    //founded and i starts on correct and i+k is the first char after
    end = origin.substring(i+k,originLen);
    if(i == 0)
        return end;
    else{
        start = origin.substring(0,i) 
        return (start + end);
    }
}
0

I would suggest using the replace-last npm package.

var str = 'one two, one three, one four, one';
var result = replaceLast(str, 'one', 'finish');
console.log(result);
<script src="https://unpkg.com/replace-last@latest/replaceLast.js"></script>

This works for string and regex replacements.

0
function replaceLast(text, searchValue, replaceValue) {
  const lastOccurrenceIndex = text.lastIndexOf(searchValue)
  return `${
      text.slice(0, lastOccurrenceIndex)
    }${
      replaceValue
    }${
      text.slice(lastOccurrenceIndex + searchValue.length)
    }`
}
0

A negative lookahead solution:

str.replace(/(one)(?!.*\1)/, 'finish')
-1
str = (str + '?').replace(list[i] + '?', 'finish');
1
  • 7
    Normally, an explanation is generally wanted in addition to the answer
    – user4413591
    Feb 12, 2015 at 23:44
-1

this way works for me. take a look at replace last character in string javascript

str.replace(/one([^one]*$)/, 'finish$1')

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