58

I am attempting to read a file that is in a aws s3 bucket using

fs.readFile(file, function (err, contents) {
  var myLines = contents.Body.toString().split('\n')
})

I've been able to download and upload a file using the node aws-sdk, but I am at a loss as to how to simply read it and parse the contents.

Here is an example of how I am reading the file from s3:

var s3 = new AWS.S3();
var params = {Bucket: 'myBucket', Key: 'myKey.csv'}
var s3file = s3.getObject(params)
  • 3
    contents.Body.toString() instead of contents.Body – Jason Apr 20 '16 at 0:00
74

You have a couple options. You can include a callback as a second argument, which will be invoked with any error message and the object. This example is straight from the AWS documentation:

s3.getObject(params, function(err, data) {
  if (err) console.log(err, err.stack); // an error occurred
  else     console.log(data);           // successful response
});

Alternatively, you can convert the output to a stream. There's also an example in the AWS documentation:

var s3 = new AWS.S3({apiVersion: '2006-03-01'});
var params = {Bucket: 'myBucket', Key: 'myImageFile.jpg'};
var file = require('fs').createWriteStream('/path/to/file.jpg');
s3.getObject(params).createReadStream().pipe(file);
  • What if I also wish to use a Promise for better overall async handling? – verveguy Aug 24 '16 at 3:17
  • 10
    @verveguy You can use the following: new Promise((resolve, reject) => {s3.getObject(params).createReadStream().on('end', () => { return resolve(); }).on('error', (error) => { return reject(error); }).pipe(file)}); – Gustavo Straube Sep 29 '16 at 13:37
  • 1
    @verveguy Depending on which version of node you are running, the aws-sdk version > 2.3.0, will use native promises. You can also explicitly configure which promise library you would like to use. if (typeof Promise === 'undefined') { console.log("Using Bluebird for Promises"); AWS.config.setPromisesDependency(require('bluebird')); } – alexhb Nov 23 '16 at 19:29
  • How we can know if pipe() has been ended so that we can do another task on the file after writing it locally...? – usama Jul 15 '18 at 7:45
30

This will do it:

new AWS.S3().getObject({ Bucket: this.awsBucketName, Key: keyName }, function(err, data)
{
    if (!err)
        console.log(data.Body.toString());
});
19

Since you seem to want to process an S3 text file line-by-line. Here is a Node version that uses the standard readline module and AWS' createReadStream()

const readline = require('readline');

const rl = readline.createInterface({
    input: s3.getObject(params).createReadStream()
});

rl.on('line', function(line) {
    console.log(line);
})
.on('close', function() {
});
7

I couldn't figure why yet, but the createReadStream/pipe approach didn't work for me. I was trying to download a large CSV file (300MB+) and I got duplicated lines. It seemed a random issue. The final file size varied in each attempt to download it.

I ended up using another way, based on AWS JS SDK examples:

var s3 = new AWS.S3();
var params = {Bucket: 'myBucket', Key: 'myImageFile.jpg'};
var file = require('fs').createWriteStream('/path/to/file.jpg');

s3.getObject(params).
    on('httpData', function(chunk) { file.write(chunk); }).
    on('httpDone', function() { file.end(); }).
    send();

This way, it worked like a charm.

4

here is the example which i used to retrive and parse json data from s3.

    var params = {Bucket: BUCKET_NAME, Key: KEY_NAME};
    new AWS.S3().getObject(params, function(err, json_data)
    {
      if (!err) {
        var json = JSON.parse(new Buffer(json_data.Body).toString("utf8"));

       // PROCESS JSON DATA
           ......
     }
   });
  • 1
    this slows my code when the json_data is a large json array... – Prasanth Jaya Dec 2 '16 at 5:41
3

I had exactly the same issue when downloading from S3 very large files.

The example solution from AWS docs just does not work:

var file = fs.createWriteStream(options.filePath);
        file.on('close', function(){
            if(self.logger) self.logger.info("S3Dataset file download saved to %s", options.filePath );
            return callback(null,done);
        });
        s3.getObject({ Key:  documentKey }).createReadStream().on('error', function(err) {
            if(self.logger) self.logger.error("S3Dataset download error key:%s error:%@", options.fileName, error);
            return callback(error);
        }).pipe(file);

While this solution will work:

    var file = fs.createWriteStream(options.filePath);
    s3.getObject({ Bucket: this._options.s3.Bucket, Key: documentKey })
    .on('error', function(err) {
        if(self.logger) self.logger.error("S3Dataset download error key:%s error:%@", options.fileName, error);
        return callback(error);
    })
    .on('httpData', function(chunk) { file.write(chunk); })
    .on('httpDone', function() { 
        file.end(); 
        if(self.logger) self.logger.info("S3Dataset file download saved to %s", options.filePath );
        return callback(null,done);
    })
    .send();

The createReadStream attempt just does not fire the end, close or error callback for some reason. See here about this.

I'm using that solution also for writing down archives to gzip, since the first one (AWS example) does not work in this case either:

        var gunzip = zlib.createGunzip();
        var file = fs.createWriteStream( options.filePath );

        s3.getObject({ Bucket: this._options.s3.Bucket, Key: documentKey })
        .on('error', function (error) {
            if(self.logger) self.logger.error("%@",error);
            return callback(error);
        })
        .on('httpData', function (chunk) {
            file.write(chunk);
        })
        .on('httpDone', function () {

            file.end();

            if(self.logger) self.logger.info("downloadArchive downloaded %s", options.filePath);

            fs.createReadStream( options.filePath )
            .on('error', (error) => {
                return callback(error);
            })
            .on('end', () => {
                if(self.logger) self.logger.info("downloadArchive unarchived %s", options.fileDest);
                return callback(null, options.fileDest);
            })
            .pipe(gunzip)
            .pipe(fs.createWriteStream(options.fileDest))
        })
        .send();
2

If you want to save memory and want to obtain each row as a json object, then you can use fast-csv to create readstream and can read each row as a json object as follows:

const csv = require('fast-csv');
const AWS = require('aws-sdk');

const credentials = new AWS.Credentials("ACCESSKEY", "SECRETEKEY", "SESSIONTOKEN");
AWS.config.update({
    credentials: credentials, // credentials required for local execution
    region: 'your_region'
});
const dynamoS3Bucket = new AWS.S3();
const stream = dynamoS3Bucket.getObject({ Bucket: 'your_bucket', Key: 'example.csv' }).createReadStream();

var parser = csv.fromStream(stream, { headers: true }).on("data", function (data) {
    parser.pause();  //can pause reading using this at a particular row
    parser.resume(); // to continue reading
    console.log(data);
}).on("end", function () {
    console.log('process finished');
});
0

I prefer Buffer.from(data.Body).toString('utf8'). It supports encoding parameters. With other AWS services (ex. Kinesis Streams) someone may want to replace 'utf8' encoding with 'base64'.

new AWS.S3().getObject(
  { Bucket: this.awsBucketName, Key: keyName }, 
  function(err, data) {
    if (!err) {
      const body = Buffer.from(data.Body).toString('utf8');
      console.log(body);
    }
  }
);

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