37

I have to access the Nth line in a CSV file.

Here's what I did:

import csv

the_file = open('path', 'r')
reader = csv.reader(the_file)

N = input('What line do you need? > ')
i = 0

for row in reader:
    if i == N:
        print("This is the line.")
        print(row)
        break

    i += 1

the_file.close()

...but this does not feel optimal. Edit for precision: If the file is huge, I do not want to go through all the lines and I do not want to have to load the whole file into memory.

I do hope something like reader[N] exists, but I have not found it.

Edit for answer: This line (coming from chosen answer) is what I was looking for:

next(itertools.islice(csv.reader(f), N, None)
5
  • 2
    Is 'optimal' in terms of code compactness? Could do lines = [row for row in reader], then lines[N]. Note that like some other answers, this requires reading the whole file.
    – OJFord
    Dec 5, 2014 at 1:49
  • 1
    The question appears to be off-topic because it is about optimization of working code, fits best on //codereview.stackexchange.com
    – Alex
    Dec 5, 2014 at 10:00
  • As Ollie said, no matter what the code looks like, you're starting at position 0 of the document, and going to position x. This isn't like an array where some math can be done to quickly jump to the right location.
    – David
    Dec 5, 2014 at 10:46
  • @OllieFord lines = list(reader) would be more idiomatic.
    – Veedrac
    Dec 5, 2014 at 13:04
  • @Veedrac Nice. list(reader)[N] is probably optimal if compactness of code is the goal.
    – OJFord
    Dec 5, 2014 at 13:07

6 Answers 6

46

You can use enumerate to iterate through the list until you find the right row:

for i, row in enumerate(reader):
    if i == line_number:
        print("This is the line.")
        print(row)
        break

You can also use itertools.islice which is designed for this type of scenario - accessing a particular slice of an iterable without reading the whole thing into memory. It should be a bit more efficient than looping through the unwanted rows.

def get_csv_line(path, line_number):
    with open(path) as f:
        return next(itertools.islice(csv.reader(f), line_number, None))

But if your CSV file is small, just read the entire thing into a list, which you can then access with an index in the normal way. This also has the advantage that you can access several different rows in random order without having to reset the csv reader.

with open(path) as f:
    my_csv_data = list(csv.reader(f))
print(my_csv_data[line_number])
7
  • To get the line number right using enumerate(), you'd probably want to add the keyword argument start=1 to the call.
    – martineau
    Dec 5, 2014 at 13:59
  • @martineau maybe but I've left it as it is to match the OP's code which starts at 0.
    – Stuart
    Dec 5, 2014 at 17:21
  • 2
    pythons csv reader has a line_num property so you wouldn't have to use enumerate if you didn't want to. Something like... if reader.line_num == N: do something
    – b10hazard
    Dec 9, 2016 at 12:29
  • 1
    @NaveenReddyMarthala see my edit which places the code inside a function. You would need to reopen the file each time; easiest to do this with a with block. If you are reading a lot of different rows, it is probably easiest just to read the whole CSV file into a list, as in the 3rd solution in this answer.
    – Stuart
    Oct 28, 2021 at 15:22
  • 1
    @naveenreddymarthala is it too big? You could use the function in the 2nd solution, or adapt it to take a list of line numbers instead of one, or use some kind of caching system
    – Stuart
    Oct 29, 2021 at 8:36
8

Your solution is actually not that bad. Advancing the file iterator to the line you want is a good approach and is used in many situations like this.

If you want it more concise though, you can use next and enumerate with a generator expression:

import csv

the_file = open('path', 'r')
reader = csv.reader(the_file)

N = int(input('What line do you need? > '))

line = next((x for i, x in enumerate(reader) if i == N), None)
print(line)

the_file.close()

The None in there is what will be returned if the line is not found (N is too large). You can pick any other value though.


You could also open the file with a with-statement to have it be automatically closed:

import csv

with open('path', 'r') as the_file:
    reader = csv.reader(the_file)

    N = int(input('What line do you need? > '))

    line = next((x for i, x in enumerate(reader) if i == N), None)
    print(line)

If you really want to cut down on size, you could do:

from csv import reader
N = int(input('What line do you need? > '))
with open('path') as f:
    print(next((x for i, x in enumerate(reader(f)) if i == N), None))
1
  • Nice use of next! Never seen that before:-) +1
    – Marcin
    Dec 5, 2014 at 1:45
8

The itertools module has a number of functions for creating specialized iterators — and its islice() function could be used to easily solve this problem:

import csv
import itertools

N = 5  # desired line number

with open('path.csv', newline='') as the_file:
    row = next(csv.reader(itertools.islice(the_file, N, N+1)))

print("This is the line.")
print(row)

P.S. For the curious, my initial response — which also works (arguably better) — was:

    row = next(itertools.islice(csv.reader(the_file), N, N+1))
7
  • 1
    If you're sure the CSV maps source lines to CSV lines 1:1, do the slicing over the file (islice(infile, ...)) before passing it into csv.reader.
    – Veedrac
    Dec 5, 2014 at 13:06
  • @Veedrac except you gain nothing from that except potential for erroneous data later on... I'd have personally stuck with the original version Dec 5, 2014 at 13:33
  • @JonClements I meant to post that as an alternative for when you need faster access; it's not guaranteed to be correct so I also wouldn't use it by default.
    – Veedrac
    Dec 5, 2014 at 13:38
  • 3
    @JonClements For N = 16...4096 in factors of two, the speed advantage of my approach is a factor of [2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 12, 15, 16].
    – Veedrac
    Dec 5, 2014 at 14:10
  • 1
    @Veedrac I'd have gone for a little bit - but certainly wouldn't have figured that large a difference! Many thanks for taking the time to respond with some numbers. Dec 5, 2014 at 14:12
7

You can simply do:

n = 2 # line to print
fd = open('foo.csv', 'r')
lines = fd.readlines()
print lines[n-1] # prints 2nd line
fd.close()

Or even better to utilize less memory by not loading entire file into memory:

import linecache
n = 2
linecache.getline('foo.csv', n)
7
  • @OllieFord: Thanks for the observation. linecache can be used as an alternative.
    – ajmartin
    Dec 5, 2014 at 1:57
  • I didn't know about linecache - this seems an excellent solution!
    – OJFord
    Dec 5, 2014 at 1:59
  • 2
    What about multi-line fields in the CSV? Dec 5, 2014 at 10:04
  • 2
    As I understand that document the CSV format allows line breaks in fields as long as they are within double quotes (section 2, para 6), so if there's any possibility of this it's better to use csv.reader
    – Stuart
    Dec 5, 2014 at 21:35
  • 1
    If you look at the source for the linecachemodule, you'll see that it reads the entire file into memory using file.readlines(), too, so it wouldn't use less memory. It also additional overhead incurred since it was intended to be used for reading many lines from [other] imported modules, rather than a single one from a data file.
    – martineau
    Dec 11, 2014 at 16:14
3

You could minimize your for loop into a comprehension expression, e.g.

row = [row for i,row in enumerate(reader) if i == N][0]  

# or even nicer as seen in iCodez code with next and generator expression

row = next(row for i,row in enumerate(reader) if i == N)
3
import csv
with open('cvs_file.csv', 'r') as inFile: 
    reader = csv.reader(inFile)
    my_content = list(reader)

line_no = input('What line do you need(line number begins from 0)? > ')
if line_no < len(my_content):
    print(my_content[line_no])
else:
    print('This line does not exists')

As a result now you can get any line by its index directly:

What line do you need? > 2
['101', '0.19', '1']

What line do you need? > 100
This line does not exists
1
  • @Veedrac Thanks, I used dict based on of its O(1) complexity for d[k] but even l[i] has same O(1) complexity. Dec 5, 2014 at 16:21

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.