0

So take this hypothetical:

public enum CollectionRange
{
    One,
    ZeroToOne,
    ZeroToMany,
    OneToMany
}


public interface ICollectableTypeTemplate
{
    CollectionRange PossibleRange { get; }

    bool MustHaveAtleastOneItem
    {
        get
        {
            return PossibleRange == CollectionRange.One ||
                   PossibleRange == CollectionRange.OneToMany;
        }
    }

    bool MulipleOfTypeAllowed
    {
        get
        {
            return PossibleRange == CollectionRange.ZeroToMany ||
                   PossibleRange == CollectionRange.OneToMany;
        }
    }

}

This will error because I have given those two helper properties body.. but why cant they have body? what is a nice way I can redesign this so it builds?

4
  • 1
    If you need to implement something in an interface-like manner, use an abstract class. Interfaces don't have their own implementation.
    – Tim
    Dec 5 '14 at 4:17
  • maybe you need an abstract class instead.
    – Mayank
    Dec 5 '14 at 4:18
  • Until C# does some default type of thing, you're out of luck. Interfaces define a contract that classes must satisfy. It doesn't define them. Dec 5 '14 at 4:18
  • Use a base class with virtual methods. Dec 5 '14 at 4:18
5

You cannot do this in an Interface because the language was designed so that an Interface is only a placeholder for methods and properties that must be implemented. This is by design, and often a good practice.

An Abstract Class is very similar to an Interface, but different two ways...

  1. It CAN have defined logic. So for your purpose you would use an Abstract Class.
  2. A class can only inherit from one Abstract Class, while it can implement many interfaces.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/k535acbf(v=vs.71).aspx

1
  • 4
    There is one important difference between interface and abstract class - you can implement multiple interfaces but inherit only one class. Sometimes that's a blocker. Dec 5 '14 at 4:26
4

going off of what Jonathan Allen said in his answer, I think adding the helpers as extensions to the interface is the ideal solution? (avoiding the multiple inheritance problems that might arise with using an abstract class)

Any problems with this?

public enum CollectionRange
{
    One,
    ZeroToOne,
    ZeroToMany,
    OneToMany
}


public interface ICollectableTypeTemplate
{
    CollectionRange PossibleRange { get; }
}

public static class MyExtentions
{


    public static bool MustHaveAtleastOneItem(this ICollectableTypeTemplate i)
    {
        return i.PossibleRange == CollectionRange.One ||
                   i.PossibleRange == CollectionRange.OneToMany;
    }

    public static bool MulipleOfTypeAllowed(this ICollectableTypeTemplate i)
    {
        return i.PossibleRange == CollectionRange.ZeroToMany ||
                  i.PossibleRange == CollectionRange.OneToMany;
    }

}
2

but why cant they have body?

Because that's not how the CLR was designed and C# cannot directly override this limitation.

In theory C# could take you code and automatically create a static class full of extension methods for that interface, but that's not really in the spirit of C#.

(You do see some overriding of CLR limitations in VB, but even there it is pretty rare.)


what is a nice way I can redesign this so it builds?

Use an abstract class instead of an interface.

3
  • That's not even remotely close to being true. Interfaces are a CLR concept. This has serious ramifications such as the inability to support multiple inheritance in other languages that target the CLR. Dec 5 '14 at 20:08
  • "That's not even remotely close to being true" -- you must have a different definition of "remote" than I do. Check the IL for an interface and compare that to the IL for an abstract class. They both use the same basic declaration of an abstract class. Yes, CLR enforces the multiple inheritance rules -- the two aren't identical. But given you've misunderstood the point I was trying to make, I suppose others will too. Dec 5 '14 at 20:25
  • I'm looking at it right now for ICloneable and it says .class public interface abstract auto ansi ICloneable. Note the interface keyword. That's rather important. Dec 5 '14 at 22:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.