61

I'm looking to create this overlapping circles shape in CSS:

Desired overlapping cicles shape

Basically, just stacked circles. I've looked around, and all solutions I see include using multiple div elements for this effect. However, can't this be done with a single div, using CSS3? I looked at how it could be easily done, and figured that, if all colours are the same, you'd have a pill shape like this:

http://jsfiddle.net/5wytm0r4/

 #circles {
   background-color: red;
   width: 130px;
   height: 100px;
   border-radius: 50px;
 }
<div id="circles"></div>

And then simply draw a couple of quarter moons in it, and you're done. However, I can't figure out how to draw these moon shapes in my capsule shaped div.

1
  • 2
    Out of interest, why use 5000px as the border radius instead of just 50px (or 50%)?
    – Michael
    Dec 5, 2014 at 14:21

4 Answers 4

112

With CSS box-shadows

You can use multiple box-shadows with several colours on a rounded div. They need to be seperated by a comma:

#circles {
  background-color: red;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  border-radius: 50%;
  box-shadow: 10px 0 0 -2px #f8ff00,
              20px 0 0 -4px #009901,
              30px 0 0 -6px #3531ff;
}
<div id="circles"></div>

output :

CSS orvelapping circles

Browser support for box-shadows is IE9+ (for more info see canIuse)


You can also make the overlapping circles shape responsive according to the width of the viewport with vw units : DEMO

#circles {
  background-color: red;
  width: 20vw;
  height: 20vw;
  margin: 0 auto;
  border-radius: 50%;
  box-shadow: 2vw 0 0 -0.4vw #f8ff00, 
              4vw 0 0 -0.8vw #009901, 
              6vw 0 0 -1.2vw #3531ff;
}
<div id="circles"></div>

Browser support for vw units is IE9+ (for more info see canIuse)


With SVG

Another approach would be to use an inline svg with the <circle> element.
This is responsive according to the size of the parent and browser support goes back to IE9 like box-shadows :

svg{width:80%;}
<svg viewbox="0 0 100 30">  
  <circle cx="59" cy="15" r="8.5" fill="darkorange" />
  <circle cx="56" cy="15" r="9" fill="gold" />
  <circle cx="53" cy="15" r="9.5" fill="tomato" />
  <circle cx="50" cy="15" r="10" fill="teal" />
</svg>

I also expanded on the SVG version to make an animated "worm" with more overlapping circles. You can see it in this pen : animated worm

And it looks like this :

Animated worm made of overlapping circles

5
  • 1
    @imdabestmanideedeet weren't you trying to do this jsfiddle.net/webtiki/5wytm0r4/4 ?
    – web-tiki
    Dec 5, 2014 at 11:18
  • My mistake, I meant to post the URL you just posted. Thanks! I'll remove the offending comment. For other people reading this: the above JSfiddle makes all the circles of equal size instead of slightly smaller as in the answer.
    – yesman
    Dec 5, 2014 at 11:20
  • 1
    @imdabestmanideedeet in the fiddle I posted in my previous comment, the circles are 2px wider. For same size circles, you need to do this : jsfiddle.net/webtiki/5wytm0r4/8
    – web-tiki
    Dec 5, 2014 at 15:14
  • 1
    Ooh, vw units, I now have my weekend research :).
    – TMH
    Dec 5, 2014 at 16:33
  • 1
    @TomHart they are very interesting even though with some limitations. Also Look into vh/vmin/vmax units!
    – web-tiki
    Dec 5, 2014 at 17:04
12

It is possible to use CSS3 multiple background images and radial gradients together:

#circles {
  width: 115px;
  height: 100px;
  background-image:
    radial-gradient(circle at 50px 50px, #F00 0, #F00 50px, transparent 50px),
    radial-gradient(circle at 55px 50px, #FF0 0, #FF0 50px, transparent 50px),
    radial-gradient(circle at 60px 50px, #080 0, #080 50px, transparent 50px),
    radial-gradient(circle at 65px 50px, #00F 0, #00F 50px, transparent 50px);
}
<div id="circles"></div>

1
8

Or, if you're feeling crazy, you could make an svg and use it inline as a background image:

#circles {
  width: 120px;
  height: 100px;
  background-image: url("data:image/svg+xml;utf8,<svg version='1.1' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' width='100%' height='100%'><circle fill='blue'  cy='50' cx='70' r='50' /><circle fill='green'  cy='50' cx='65' r='50' /><circle fill='yellow'  cy='50' cx='60' r='50' /><circle fill='red'  cy='50' cx='55' r='50' /></svg>");
}
<div id="circles"></div>

4
  • 2
    You need to URL encode the data, it might not work otherwise (e.g. in IE).
    – Salman A
    Dec 8, 2014 at 10:44
  • You don't have to create multiple circle tags. Simple use the use tag and transform its X-axis.
    – Weafs.py
    Dec 10, 2014 at 10:21
  • Great points - for readability, I havn't URL encoded the SVG in the snippet, but future readers should be aware that without URL encoding the svg it won't work in IE. Mar 12, 2015 at 21:40
  • Great point about the use tag, thanks for teaching me something new. Surprisingly, when created with the <code>use</code> tag the SVG code is longer, but here it is anyway for future reference: <svg version='1.1' xmlns='http://www.w3.org/2000/svg' width='100%' height='100%'><defs><circle cx='50' cy='50' id='circle' r='50'/></defs><use xlink:href='#circle' fill='blue' x='15' /><use xlink:href='#circle' fill='green' x='10' /><use xlink:href='#circle' fill='yellow' x='5' /><use xlink:href='#circle' fill='red' /></svg> Mar 12, 2015 at 21:44
2

You can achieve this by pseudo-selectors like ::before and::after, You can find the jsfiddle https://jsfiddle.net/zakirshaik/jL78m9d1/6/.

You can add shadows to the code to increase the number of circles.

.circle-overlaping{
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: red;
  border-radius: 50%;
  position:relative;
}

.circle-overlaping::before{
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 20px;
  background-color: yellow;
  width: 100px;
  height:100px;
  border-radius: 50%;
}

.circle-overlaping::after{
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  left: 40px;
  background-color: blue;
  width: 100px;
  height:100px;
  border-radius: 50%;
}
<div class="circle-overlaping">

</div>

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