88

I want to know item count with DynamoDB querying.

I can querying for DynamoDB, but I only want to know 'total count of item'.

For example, 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM ... WHERE ...' in MySQL

$result = $aws->query(array(
 'TableName' => 'game_table',
 'IndexName' => 'week-point-index',
 'KeyConditions' => array(
    'week' => array(
        'ComparisonOperator' => 'EQ',
        'AttributeValueList' => array(
            array(Type::STRING => $week)
        )
    ),
    'point' => array(
        'ComparisonOperator' => 'GE',
        'AttributeValueList' => array(
            array(Type::NUMBER => $my_point)
        )
    )
 ),
));
echo Count($result['Items']);

this code gets the all users data higher than my point.

If count of $result is 100,000, $result is too much big. And it would exceed the limits of the query size.

I need help.

13 Answers 13

30

You can use the Select parameter and use COUNT in the request. It "returns the number of matching items, rather than the matching items themselves". Important, as brought up by Saumitra R. Bhave in a comment, "If the size of the Query result set is larger than 1 MB, then ScannedCount and Count will represent only a partial count of the total items. You will need to perform multiple Query operations in order to retrieve all of the results".

I'm Not familiar with PHP but here is how you could use it with Java. And then instead of using Count (which I am guessing is a function in PHP) on the 'Items' you can use the Count value from the response - $result['Count']:

final String week = "whatever";
final Integer myPoint = 1337;
Condition weekCondition = new Condition()
        .withComparisonOperator(ComparisonOperator.EQ)
        .withAttributeValueList(new AttributeValue().withS(week));
Condition myPointCondition = new Condition()
        .withComparisonOperator(ComparisonOperator.GE)
        .withAttributeValueList(new AttributeValue().withN(myPoint.toString()))

Map<String, Condition> keyConditions = new HashMap<>();
keyConditions.put("week", weekCondition);
keyConditions.put("point", myPointCondition);

QueryRequest request = new QueryRequest("game_table");
request.setIndexName("week-point-index");
request.setSelect(Select.COUNT);
request.setKeyConditions(keyConditions);

QueryResult result = dynamoDBClient.query(request);
Integer count = result.getCount();

If you don't need to emulate the WHERE clause, you can use a DescribeTable request and use the resulting item count to get an estimate.

The number of items in the specified table. DynamoDB updates this value approximately every six hours. Recent changes might not be reflected in this value.

Also, an important note from the documentation as noted by Saumitra R. Bhave in the comments on this answer:

If the size of the Query result set is larger than 1 MB, ScannedCount and Count represent only a partial count of the total items. You need to perform multiple Query operations to retrieve all the results (see Paginating Table Query Results).

3
  • 17
    I think there is a small catch here though, as per docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/… which says "If the size of the Query result set is larger than 1 MB, then ScannedCount and Count will represent only a partial count of the total items", which basically means that Items are first fetch and then counted, and if the size of fetched items exceed 1MB even 'count' will be paginated – Saumitra R. Bhave Apr 16 '17 at 6:22
  • I don't want to steal @mkobit's original work, but this is a way to do it using fluent chaining: AmazonDynamoDBClientBuilder.standard().withRegion(region).withCredentials(credentialsProvider).build() .query(new QueryRequest(freeKeysTableName).withSelect(Select.COUNT)).getCount() – Sridhar Sarnobat Jul 27 '18 at 0:31
  • 2
    Just to complete your answer, as pointed out you may have to repeat the call until LastEvaluatedKey is no longer present in the results and this may look like this (comes to the end of the code above): while(result.getLastEvaluatedKey()!=null){ request.setExclusiveStartKey(result.getLastEvaluatedKey()); result = dynamoDBClient.query(request); count+= result.getCount(); } – Peter Koncz Apr 5 '19 at 7:03
152

With the aws dynamodb cli you can get it via scan as follows:

aws dynamodb scan --table-name <TABLE_NAME> --select "COUNT"

The response will look similar to this:

{
    "Count": 123,
    "ScannedCount": 123,
    "ConsumedCapacity": null
}

notice that this information is in real time in contrast to the describe-table api

11
  • 2
    @JHH I've just tried this and it does appear to use read capacity units. According to the DynamoDB console my query consumed about 12 units (only 1 is configured); I assume it's utilising burst capacity to service the query. – Zodman Jan 23 '18 at 6:34
  • 2
    @Zodman thanks for trying it! I read through the docs once more and I actually found a statement regarding counts that I previously missed: "Getting the count of items uses the same quantity of read capacity units and is subject to the same item size calculations, because DynamoDB has to read each item in order to increment the count." docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/… – JHH Jan 23 '18 at 7:38
  • 2
    One might think that caching the count, at least within eventually consistent boundaries, would be feasible to make it only consume one single CU, but maybe getting only the count isn't a very common scenario. – JHH Jan 23 '18 at 7:41
  • 2
    @HelenNeely Yes, this way provides the latest item count. – Daniel Bubenheim Feb 27 '18 at 19:37
  • 1
    This answer is not correct, at least in the context of the question. The question is how to get a count of the records matching a filter expression, hence the comparison to the WHERE statement. AFAIK from trying to figure this out for months is you can't get a count of matching records. dynamoDB will go through each record in the table or index and return those matching the filter, 1000 records at a time. You may only have 20 matching records and would get 20 as the count. However there may be 40 in the next 1000 records, and so on. – Chris Love Jul 23 '20 at 15:34
23

Can be seen from UI as well. Go to overview tab on table, you will see item count. Hope it helps someone.

2
  • 6
    Yes, but this has limitations: "Storage size and item count are not updated in real-time. They are updated periodically, roughly every six hours." – matthias Jun 21 '18 at 13:23
  • Also, if we want to see the count of a query, it cant be done in Overview tab. It just shows total rows in table, not the count of resultset of my query. – Jyotsana Nandwani Apr 8 '19 at 5:16
9

Replace the table name and use the below query to get the data on your local environment:

aws dynamodb scan --table-name <TABLE_NAME> --select "COUNT" --endpoint-url http://localhost:8000

Replace the table name and remove the endpoint url to get the data on production environment

aws dynamodb scan --table-name <TABLE_NAME> --select "COUNT"
6

If you happen to reach here, and you are working with C#, here is the code:

var cancellationToken = new CancellationToken();

var request = new ScanRequest("TableName") {Select = Select.COUNT};

var result = context.Client.ScanAsync(request, cancellationToken).Result;

totalCount = result.Count;
1
  • This doesn't work if you have more than 1MB of items. – JohnOpincar Oct 21 '20 at 22:05
1

Similar to Java in PHP only set Select PARAMETER with value 'COUNT'

$result = $aws->query(array(
 'TableName' => 'game_table',
 'IndexName' => 'week-point-index',
 'KeyConditions' => array(
    'week' => array(
        'ComparisonOperator' => 'EQ',
        'AttributeValueList' => array(
            array(Type::STRING => $week)
        )
    ),
    'point' => array(
        'ComparisonOperator' => 'GE',
        'AttributeValueList' => array(
            array(Type::NUMBER => $my_point)
        )
    )
 ),
 'Select' => 'COUNT'
));

and acces it just like this :

echo $result['Count'];

but as Saumitra mentioned above be careful with resultsets largers than 1 MB, in that case use LastEvaluatedKey til it returns null to get the last updated count value.

1

In Scala:

import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.AmazonDynamoDBClientBuilder
import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.document.DynamoDB
val client = AmazonDynamoDBClientBuilder.standard().build()

val dynamoDB = new DynamoDB(client)
val tableDescription = dynamoDB.getTable("table name").describe().getItemCount()
1

I'm posting this answer for anyone using C# that wants a fully functional, well-tested answer that demonstrates using query instead of scan. In particular, this answer handles more than 1MB size of items to count.

        public async Task<int> GetAvailableCount(string pool_type, string pool_key)
    {
        var queryRequest = new QueryRequest
        {
            TableName = PoolsDb.TableName,
            ConsistentRead = true,
            Select = Select.COUNT,
            KeyConditionExpression = "pool_type_plus_pool_key = :type_plus_key",
            ExpressionAttributeValues = new Dictionary<string, AttributeValue> {
                {":type_plus_key", new AttributeValue { S =  pool_type + pool_key }}
            },
        };
        var t0 = DateTime.UtcNow;
        var result = await Client.QueryAsync(queryRequest);
        var count = result.Count;
        var iter = 0;
        while ( result.LastEvaluatedKey != null && result.LastEvaluatedKey.Values.Count > 0) 
        {
            iter++;
            var lastkey = result.LastEvaluatedKey.Values.ToList()[0].S;
            _logger.LogDebug($"GetAvailableCount {pool_type}-{pool_key} iteration {iter} instance key {lastkey}");
            queryRequest.ExclusiveStartKey = result.LastEvaluatedKey;
            result = await Client.QueryAsync(queryRequest);
            count += result.Count;
        }
        _logger.LogDebug($"GetAvailableCount {pool_type}-{pool_key} returned {count} after {iter} iterations in {(DateTime.UtcNow - t0).TotalMilliseconds} ms.");
        return count;
    }
}
1

I'm too late here but like to extend Daniel's answer about using aws cli to include filter expression.

Running

aws dynamodb scan \
    --table-name <tableName> \
    --filter-expression "#v = :num" \
    --expression-attribute-names '{"#v": "fieldName"}' \
    --expression-attribute-values '{":num": {"N": "123"}}' \
    --select "COUNT"

would give

{
    "Count": 2945,
    "ScannedCount": 7874,
    "ConsumedCapacity": null
}

That is, ScannedCount is total count and Count is the number of items which are filtered by given expression (fieldName=123).

0

You could use dynamodb mapper query.

PaginatedQueryList<YourModel> list = DymamoDBMapper.query(YourModel.class, queryExpression);
int count = list.size();

it calls loadAllResults() that would lazily load next available result until allResultsLoaded.

Ref: https://docs.amazonaws.cn/en_us/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/DynamoDBMapper.Methods.html#DynamoDBMapper.Methods.query

0
len(response['Items'])

will give you the count of the filtered rows

where,

fe = Key('entity').eq('tesla')
response = table.scan(FilterExpression=fe)
-2

I used scan to get total count of the required tableName.Following is a Java code snippet for same

Long totalItemCount = 0;
do{
    ScanRequest req = new ScanRequest();
    req.setTableName(tableName);

    if(result != null){
        req.setExclusiveStartKey(result.getLastEvaluatedKey());
    }

    result = client.scan(req);

    totalItemCount += result.getItems().size();

} while(result.getLastEvaluatedKey() != null);

System.out.println("Result size: " + totalItemCount);
-5

This is solution for AWS JavaScript SDK users, it is almost same for other languages.

Result.data.Count will give you what you are looking for

 apigClient.getitemPost({}, body, {})

    .then(function(result){

        var dataoutput = result.data.Items[0];

        console.log(result.data.Count);
  }).catch( function(result){

});
1
  • 2
    Please include an explanation with your answer. – WonderWorker May 11 '17 at 8:18

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