907

What is the best way to randomize the order of a generic list in C#? I've got a finite set of 75 numbers in a list I would like to assign a random order to, in order to draw them for a lottery type application.

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  • 3
    There is an open issue to integrate this functionality to .NET: github.com/dotnet/corefx/issues/461 – Natan Mar 7 '15 at 10:19
  • 5
    You may be interested in this NuGet package, which contains extension methods for shuffling IList<T> and IEnumerable<T> using the Fisher-Yates algorithm mentioned below – ChaseMedallion May 7 '16 at 14:44
  • 3
    @Natan they closed the issue because someone "worked on many projects and developed many libraries and never had a need in such a method" that pissed me off. Now we have to investigate ourselves, search for the best implementations, waste time to simply reinvent the wheel. – Vitalii Isaenko Jul 16 '19 at 11:56
  • 1
    Am I seeing this right? Not a single valid functional answer after 10 years ? Maybe we need another bounty for a solution which addresses the amount of entropy needed, to shuffle a list with 75 numbers $log2(75!) = 364$ and how we can get this. One would need to reseed even a cryptographically secure RNG with 256 bits of entropy at least once during a fisher-yates shuffle. – Falco Aug 1 '19 at 16:39
  • 1
    And if the usual coder cannot solve this problem, have we all been playing the same 0.01% of possible solitaire games forever? – Falco Aug 1 '19 at 16:41

25 Answers 25

1190

Shuffle any (I)List with an extension method based on the Fisher-Yates shuffle:

private static Random rng = new Random();  

public static void Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list)  
{  
    int n = list.Count;  
    while (n > 1) {  
        n--;  
        int k = rng.Next(n + 1);  
        T value = list[k];  
        list[k] = list[n];  
        list[n] = value;  
    }  
}

Usage:

List<Product> products = GetProducts();
products.Shuffle();

The code above uses the much criticised System.Random method to select swap candidates. It's fast but not as random as it should be. If you need a better quality of randomness in your shuffles use the random number generator in System.Security.Cryptography like so:

using System.Security.Cryptography;
...
public static void Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list)
{
    RNGCryptoServiceProvider provider = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
    int n = list.Count;
    while (n > 1)
    {
        byte[] box = new byte[1];
        do provider.GetBytes(box);
        while (!(box[0] < n * (Byte.MaxValue / n)));
        int k = (box[0] % n);
        n--;
        T value = list[k];
        list[k] = list[n];
        list[n] = value;
    }
}

A simple comparison is available at this blog (WayBack Machine).

Edit: Since writing this answer a couple years back, many people have commented or written to me, to point out the big silly flaw in my comparison. They are of course right. There's nothing wrong with System.Random if it's used in the way it was intended. In my first example above, I instantiate the rng variable inside of the Shuffle method, which is asking for trouble if the method is going to be called repeatedly. Below is a fixed, full example based on a really useful comment received today from @weston here on SO.

Program.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;

namespace SimpleLottery
{
  class Program
  {
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      var numbers = new List<int>(Enumerable.Range(1, 75));
      numbers.Shuffle();
      Console.WriteLine("The winning numbers are: {0}", string.Join(",  ", numbers.GetRange(0, 5)));
    }
  }

  public static class ThreadSafeRandom
  {
      [ThreadStatic] private static Random Local;

      public static Random ThisThreadsRandom
      {
          get { return Local ?? (Local = new Random(unchecked(Environment.TickCount * 31 + Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId))); }
      }
  }

  static class MyExtensions
  {
    public static void Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list)
    {
      int n = list.Count;
      while (n > 1)
      {
        n--;
        int k = ThreadSafeRandom.ThisThreadsRandom.Next(n + 1);
        T value = list[k];
        list[k] = list[n];
        list[n] = value;
      }
    }
  }
}
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  • 32
    What if list.Count is > Byte.MaxValue? If n = 1000, then 255 / 1000 = 0, so the do loop will be an infinite loop since box[0] < 0 is always false. – AndrewS Jun 7 '11 at 10:47
  • 18
    I would like to point out, that the comparison is flawed. Using <code>new Random()</code> in a loop is the problem, not the randomness of <code>Random</code> Explanation – Sven Sep 29 '11 at 13:43
  • 9
    It is a good idea to pass an instance of Random to the Shuffle method rather than create it inside as if you are calling Shuffle lots of times in quick succession (e.g. shuffling lots of short lists), the lists will all be shuffled in the same way (e.g. first item always gets moved to position 3). – Mark Heath Feb 7 '12 at 22:43
  • 7
    Just making Random rng = new Random(); a static would solve the problem in the comparison post. As each subsequent call would follow on from the previous calls last random result. – weston Nov 28 '12 at 13:58
  • 5
    #2, it's not clear that the version with the Crypto generator works because the max range of a byte is 255, so any list larger than that will not shuffle correctly. – Mark Sowul May 8 '13 at 14:37
359

If we only need to shuffle items in a completely random order (just to mix the items in a list), I prefer this simple yet effective code that orders items by guid...

var shuffledcards = cards.OrderBy(a => Guid.NewGuid()).ToList();
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  • 42
    GUIDs are meant to be unique not random. Part of it is machine-based and another part time-based and only a small portion is random. blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2008/06/27/8659071.aspx – Despertar May 5 '13 at 7:00
  • 105
    This is a nice elegant solution. If you want something other than a guid to generate randomness, just order by something else. Eg: var shuffledcards = cards.OrderBy(a => rng.Next()); compilr.com/grenade/sandbox/Program.cs – grenade May 27 '13 at 10:54
  • 20
    Please no. This is wrong. "ordering by random" is totally NOT a shuffle: you introduce a bias and, worse, you risk to go in infinite loops – Vito De Tullio Aug 16 '13 at 10:07
  • 82
    @VitoDeTullio: You are misremembering. You risk infinite loops when you provide a random comparison function; a comparison function is required to produce a consistent total order. A random key is fine. This suggestion is wrong because guids are not guaranteed to be random, not because the technique of sorting by a random key is wrong. – Eric Lippert Sep 13 '13 at 21:30
  • 26
    @Doug: NewGuid only guarantees that it gives you a unique GUID. It makes no guarantees about randomness. If you're using a GUID for a purpose other than creating a unique value, you're doing it wrong. – Eric Lippert Sep 13 '13 at 21:31
124

I'm bit surprised by all the clunky versions of this simple algorithm here. Fisher-Yates (or Knuth shuffle) is bit tricky but very compact. Why is it tricky? Because your need to pay attention to whether your random number generator r(a,b) returns value where b is inclusive or exclusive. I've also edited Wikipedia description so people don't blindly follow pseudocode there and create hard to detect bugs. For .Net, Random.Next(a,b) returns number exclusive of b so without further ado, here's how it can be implemented in C#/.Net:

public static void Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list, Random rnd)
{
    for(var i=list.Count; i > 0; i--)
        list.Swap(0, rnd.Next(0, i));
}

public static void Swap<T>(this IList<T> list, int i, int j)
{
    var temp = list[i];
    list[i] = list[j];
    list[j] = temp;
}

Try this code.

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  • 17
    @Donuts - no. If you do that you will add bias in shuffle. – Shital Shah Jul 19 '14 at 7:16
  • 2
    By separating Swap<T> out to a separate method, seems like you cause a lot of unnecessary T allocations for temp. – Clay Dec 3 '15 at 14:52
  • 2
    I'd argue that LINQ could potentially slow the performance of the shuffling down, and that would be a reason not to use it, especially given the relative simplicity of the code. – Elianora Feb 12 '16 at 1:26
  • 7
    When i = list.Count - 1, i.e. the last iteration, rnd.Next(i, list.Count) will give you i back. You therefore need i < list.Count -1 as the loop condition. Well, you don't 'need' it, but it saves 1 iteration ;) – Pod May 28 '16 at 20:14
  • 3
    This code does not work as expected. The last number is always 0 or list.Count-1. – Oneiros Jan 3 at 17:52
81

Extension method for IEnumerable:

public static IEnumerable<T> Randomize<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    Random rnd = new Random();
    return source.OrderBy<T, int>((item) => rnd.Next());
}
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  • 3
    Note that this is not thread-safe, even if used on a thread-safe list – BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Sep 25 '12 at 3:05
  • 8
    There are two significant problems with this algorithm: -- OrderBy uses a QuickSort variant to sort the items by their (ostensibly random) keys. QuickSort performance is O(N log N); in contrast, a Fisher-Yates shuffle is O(N). For a collection of 75 elements, this may not be a big deal, but the difference will become pronounced for larger collections. – John Beyer Jun 26 '13 at 16:47
  • 10
    ... -- Random.Next() may produce a reasonably pseudo-random distribution of values, but it does not guarantee that the values will be unique. The probability of duplicate keys grows (non-linearly) with N until it reaches certainty when N reaches 2^32+1. The OrderBy QuickSort is a stable sort; thus, if multiple elements happen to get assigned the same pseudo-random index value, then their order in the output sequence will be the same as in the input sequence; thus, a bias is introduced into the "shuffle". – John Beyer Jun 26 '13 at 17:06
  • 28
    @JohnBeyer: There are far, far greater problems than that source of bias. There are only four billion possible seeds to Random, which is far, far less than the number of possible shuffles of a moderately sized set. Only a tiny fraction of the possible shuffles can be generated. That bias dwarfs the bias due to accidental collisions. – Eric Lippert Sep 13 '13 at 21:33
18

Idea is get anonymous object with item and random order and then reorder items by this order and return value:

var result = items.Select(x => new { value = x, order = rnd.Next() })
            .OrderBy(x => x.order).Select(x => x.value).ToList()
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  • 4
    best one liner solution – vipin8169 Mar 8 '19 at 7:47
  • 2
    You're missing a semicolon on the end fyi – reggaeguitar Apr 17 at 17:47
  • 1
    If anyone is unsure about rnd add this prior to the code above Random rnd = new Random(); – Greg Trevellick May 14 at 9:28
10
    public static List<T> Randomize<T>(List<T> list)
    {
        List<T> randomizedList = new List<T>();
        Random rnd = new Random();
        while (list.Count > 0)
        {
            int index = rnd.Next(0, list.Count); //pick a random item from the master list
            randomizedList.Add(list[index]); //place it at the end of the randomized list
            list.RemoveAt(index);
        }
        return randomizedList;
    }
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  • 1
    See stackoverflow.com/questions/4412405/… – nawfal May 30 '13 at 23:54
  • 4
    Shouldn't you do something like var listCopy = list.ToList() to avoid popping all of the items off the incoming list? I don't really see why you would want to mutate those lists to empty. – Chris Marisic Sep 17 '14 at 17:38
9

EDIT The RemoveAt is a weakness in my previous version. This solution overcomes that.

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(
        this IEnumerable<T> source,
        Random generator = null)
{
    if (generator == null)
    {
        generator = new Random();
    }

    var elements = source.ToArray();
    for (var i = elements.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        var swapIndex = generator.Next(i + 1);
        yield return elements[swapIndex];
        elements[swapIndex] = elements[i];
    }
}

Note the optional Random generator, if the base framework implementation of Random is not thread-safe or cryptographically strong enough for your needs, you can inject your implementation into the operation.

A suitable implementation for a thread-safe cryptographically strong Random implementation can be found in this answer.


Here's an idea, extend IList in a (hopefully) efficient way.

public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list)
{
    var choices = Enumerable.Range(0, list.Count).ToList();
    var rng = new Random();
    for(int n = choices.Count; n > 1; n--)
    {
        int k = rng.Next(n);
        yield return list[choices[k]];
        choices.RemoveAt(k);
    }

    yield return list[choices[0]];
}

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4

You can achieve that be using this simple extension method

public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{

    public static IEnumerable<t> Randomize<t>(this IEnumerable<t> target)
    {
        Random r = new Random();

        return target.OrderBy(x=>(r.Next()));
    }        
}

and you can use it by doing the following

// use this on any collection that implements IEnumerable!
// List, Array, HashSet, Collection, etc

List<string> myList = new List<string> { "hello", "random", "world", "foo", "bar", "bat", "baz" };

foreach (string s in myList.Randomize())
{
    Console.WriteLine(s);
}
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  • 3
    I would keep the Random class instance outside the function as a static variable. Otherwise you might get the same randomization seed from the timer if called in quick succession. – Lemonseed Jun 2 '16 at 16:11
  • An interesting note - if you instantiate the Random class rapidly within a loop, say between 0 ms and 200 ms of eachother, then you have a very high chance of getting the same randomization seed - which then results in repeating results. You can however get around this via using Random rand = new Random(Guid.NewGuid().GetHashCode()); This effectively forces the randomization to be derived from the Guid.NewGuid() – Baaleos Feb 16 '18 at 16:28
4

This is my preferred method of a shuffle when it's desirable to not modify the original. It's a variant of the Fisher–Yates "inside-out" algorithm that works on any enumerable sequence (the length of source does not need to be known from start).

public static IList<T> NextList<T>(this Random r, IEnumerable<T> source)
{
  var list = new List<T>();
  foreach (var item in source)
  {
    var i = r.Next(list.Count + 1);
    if (i == list.Count)
    {
      list.Add(item);
    }
    else
    {
      var temp = list[i];
      list[i] = item;
      list.Add(temp);
    }
  }
  return list;
}

This algorithm can also be implemented by allocating a range from 0 to length - 1 and randomly exhausting the indices by swapping the randomly chosen index with the last index until all indices have been chosen exactly once. This above code accomplishes the exact same thing but without the additional allocation. Which is pretty neat.

With regards to the Random class it's a general purpose number generator (and If I was running a lottery I'd consider using something different). It also relies on a time based seed value by default. A small alleviation of the problem is to seed the Random class with the RNGCryptoServiceProvider or you could use the RNGCryptoServiceProvider in a method similar to this (see below) to generate uniformly chosen random double floating point values but running a lottery pretty much requires understanding randomness and the nature of the randomness source.

var bytes = new byte[8];
_secureRng.GetBytes(bytes);
var v = BitConverter.ToUInt64(bytes, 0);
return (double)v / ((double)ulong.MaxValue + 1);

The point of generating a random double (between 0 and 1 exclusively) is to use to scale to an integer solution. If you need to pick something from a list based on a random double x that's always going to be 0 <= x && x < 1 is straight forward.

return list[(int)(x * list.Count)];

Enjoy!

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4

If you don't mind using two Lists, then this is probably the easiest way to do it, but probably not the most efficient or unpredictable one:

List<int> xList = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
List<int> deck = new List<int>();

foreach (int xInt in xList)
    deck.Insert(random.Next(0, deck.Count + 1), xInt);
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3

If you have a fixed number (75), you could create an array with 75 elements, then enumerate your list, moving the elements to randomized positions in the array. You can generate the mapping of list number to array index using the Fisher-Yates shuffle.

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3

I usually use:

var list = new List<T> ();
fillList (list);
var randomizedList = new List<T> ();
var rnd = new Random ();
while (list.Count != 0)
{
    var index = rnd.Next (0, list.Count);
    randomizedList.Add (list [index]);
    list.RemoveAt (index);
}
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  • list.RemoveAt is an O(n) operation, which makes this implementation prohibitively slow. – George Polevoy May 14 '17 at 21:09
2

Just wanted to suggest a variant using an IComparer<T> and List.Sort():

public class RandomIntComparer : IComparer<int>
{
    private readonly Random _random = new Random();
    
    public int Compare(int x, int y)
    {
        return _random.Next(-1, 2);
    }
}

Usage:

list.Sort(new RandomIntComparer());
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1
    List<T> OriginalList = new List<T>();
    List<T> TempList = new List<T>();
    Random random = new Random();
    int length = OriginalList.Count;
    int TempIndex = 0;

    while (length > 0) {
        TempIndex = random.Next(0, length);  // get random value between 0 and original length
        TempList.Add(OriginalList[TempIndex]); // add to temp list
        OriginalList.RemoveAt(TempIndex); // remove from original list
        length = OriginalList.Count;  // get new list <T> length.
    }

    OriginalList = new List<T>();
    OriginalList = TempList; // copy all items from temp list to original list.
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0

Here's an efficient Shuffler that returns a byte array of shuffled values. It never shuffles more than is needed. It can be restarted from where it previously left off. My actual implementation (not shown) is a MEF component that allows a user specified replacement shuffler.

    public byte[] Shuffle(byte[] array, int start, int count)
    {
        int n = array.Length - start;
        byte[] shuffled = new byte[count];
        for(int i = 0; i < count; i++, start++)
        {
            int k = UniformRandomGenerator.Next(n--) + start;
            shuffled[i] = array[k];
            array[k] = array[start];
            array[start] = shuffled[i];
        }
        return shuffled;
    }

`

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0

Here's a thread-safe way to do this:

public static class EnumerableExtension
{
    private static Random globalRng = new Random();

    [ThreadStatic]
    private static Random _rng;

    private static Random rng 
    {
        get
        {
            if (_rng == null)
            {
                int seed;
                lock (globalRng)
                {
                    seed = globalRng.Next();
                }
                _rng = new Random(seed);
             }
             return _rng;
         }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items)
    {
        return items.OrderBy (i => rng.Next());
    }
}
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0
 public Deck(IEnumerable<Card> initialCards) 
    {
    cards = new List<Card>(initialCards);
    public void Shuffle() 
     }
    {
        List<Card> NewCards = new List<Card>();
        while (cards.Count > 0) 
        {
            int CardToMove = random.Next(cards.Count);
            NewCards.Add(cards[CardToMove]);
            cards.RemoveAt(CardToMove);
        }
        cards = NewCards;
    }

public IEnumerable<string> GetCardNames() 

{
    string[] CardNames = new string[cards.Count];
    for (int i = 0; i < cards.Count; i++)
    CardNames[i] = cards[i].Name;
    return CardNames;
}

Deck deck1;
Deck deck2;
Random random = new Random();

public Form1() 
{

InitializeComponent();
ResetDeck(1);
ResetDeck(2);
RedrawDeck(1);
 RedrawDeck(2);

}



 private void ResetDeck(int deckNumber) 
    {
    if (deckNumber == 1) 
{
      int numberOfCards = random.Next(1, 11);
      deck1 = new Deck(new Card[] { });
      for (int i = 0; i < numberOfCards; i++)
           deck1.Add(new Card((Suits)random.Next(4),(Values)random.Next(1, 14)));
       deck1.Sort();
}


   else
    deck2 = new Deck();
 }

private void reset1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) {
ResetDeck(1);
RedrawDeck(1);

}

private void shuffle1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
    deck1.Shuffle();
    RedrawDeck(1);

}

private void moveToDeck1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{

    if (listBox2.SelectedIndex >= 0)
    if (deck2.Count > 0) {
    deck1.Add(deck2.Deal(listBox2.SelectedIndex));

}

    RedrawDeck(1);
    RedrawDeck(2);

}
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  • 2
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please consider adding some explanation to your answer, rather than just a huge block of code. Our goal here is to educate people so that they understand the answer and can apply it in other situations. If you comment your code and add an explanation, you will make your answer more helpful not just to the person who asked the question this time, but to anyone in the future who may be having the same problem. – starsplusplus Jun 16 '14 at 19:14
  • 4
    Most of this code is entirely irrelevant to the question, and the only useful part basically repeats Adam Tegen's answer from almost 6 years ago. – T.C. Jun 16 '14 at 19:16
0

A simple modification of the accepted answer that returns a new list instead of working in-place, and accepts the more general IEnumerable<T> as many other Linq methods do.

private static Random rng = new Random();

/// <summary>
/// Returns a new list where the elements are randomly shuffled.
/// Based on the Fisher-Yates shuffle, which has O(n) complexity.
/// </summary>
public static IEnumerable<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> list) {
    var source = list.ToList();
    int n = source.Count;
    var shuffled = new List<T>(n);
    shuffled.AddRange(source);
    while (n > 1) {
        n--;
        int k = rng.Next(n + 1);
        T value = shuffled[k];
        shuffled[k] = shuffled[n];
        shuffled[n] = value;
    }
    return shuffled;
}
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0

I have found an interesting solution online.

Courtesy: https://improveandrepeat.com/2018/08/a-simple-way-to-shuffle-your-lists-in-c/

var shuffled = myList.OrderBy(x => Guid.NewGuid()).ToList();

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0

Here is an implementation of the Fisher-Yates shuffle that allows specification of the number of elements to return; hence, it is not necessary to first sort the whole collection before taking your desired number of elements.

The sequence of swapping elements is reversed from default; and proceeds from the first element to the last element, so that retrieving a subset of the collection yields the same (partial) sequence as shuffling the whole collection:

collection.TakeRandom(5).SequenceEqual(collection.Shuffle().Take(5)); // true

This algorithm is based on Durstenfeld's (modern) version of the Fisher-Yates shuffle on Wikipedia.

public static IList<T> TakeRandom<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, int count, Random random) => shuffle(collection, count, random);
public static IList<T> Shuffle<T>(this IEnumerable<T> collection, Random random) => shuffle(collection, null, random);
private static IList<T> shuffle<T>(IEnumerable<T> collection, int? take, Random random)
{
    var a = collection.ToArray();
    var n = a.Length;
    if (take <= 0 || take > n) throw new ArgumentException("Invalid number of elements to return.");
    var end = take ?? n;
    for (int i = 0; i < end; i++)
    {
        var j = random.Next(i, n);
        (a[i], a[j]) = (a[j], a[i]);
    }

    if (take.HasValue) return new ArraySegment<T>(a, 0, take.Value);
    return a;
}
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0

Your question is how to randomize a list. This means:

  1. All unique combinations should be possible of happening
  2. All unique combinations should occur with the same distribution (AKA being non-biased).

A large number of the answers posted for this question do NOT satisfy the two requirements above for being "random".

Here's a compact, non-biased pseudo-random function following the Fisher-Yates shuffle method.

public static void Shuffle<T>(this IList<T> list, Random rnd)
{
    for (var i = list.Count-1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        var randomIndex = rnd.Next(i + 1); //maxValue (i + 1) is EXCLUSIVE
        list.Swap(i, randomIndex); 
    }
}

public static void Swap<T>(this IList<T> list, int indexA, int indexB)
{
   var temp = list[indexA];
   list[indexA] = list[indexB];
   list[indexB] = temp;
}
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  • Note that the first requirement will depend on the PRNG (or other RNG) at least as much as it depends on the shuffling method. For example, if the PRNG's period is less than the number of permutations on the list, then there are some permutations that PRNG can't choose. (This is with the understanding that for some applications and for a big enough list, it's generally more important to have shuffles act random than to choose from among all permutations.) – Peter O. Aug 12 at 8:08
0

One can use the Shuffle extension methond from morelinq package, it works on IEnumerables

install-package morelinq

using MoreLinq;
...    
var randomized = list.Shuffle();
| |
-2
private List<GameObject> ShuffleList(List<GameObject> ActualList) {


    List<GameObject> newList = ActualList;
    List<GameObject> outList = new List<GameObject>();

    int count = newList.Count;

    while (newList.Count > 0) {

        int rando = Random.Range(0, newList.Count);

        outList.Add(newList[rando]);

        newList.RemoveAt(rando);

     

    }

    return (outList);

}

usage :

List<GameObject> GetShuffle = ShuffleList(ActualList);
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  • Sub-optimal variant of fisher-yates, that also destroys source list. The accepted answer is the best way, no need to post more ways to do this. – Lasse V. Karlsen Nov 6 at 7:41
-5

Old post for sure, but I just use a GUID.

Items = Items.OrderBy(o => Guid.NewGuid().ToString()).ToList();

A GUID is always unique, and since it is regenerated every time the result changes each time.

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  • Compact, but do you have a reference on the sorting of consecutive newGuids to be high quality random? Some versions of quid/uuid have time stamps and other non-random parts. – Johan Lundberg Dec 10 '15 at 14:47
  • 9
    This answer has already been given, and worse it is designed for uniqueness not randomness. – Alex Angas Jan 4 '16 at 22:21
-7

A very simple approach to this kind of problem is to use a number of random element swap in the list.

In pseudo-code this would look like this:

do 
    r1 = randomPositionInList()
    r2 = randomPositionInList()
    swap elements at index r1 and index r2 
for a certain number of times
| |
  • 1
    One problem with this approach is knowing when to stop. It also has a tendency to exaggerate any biases in the pseudo-random number generator. – Mark Bessey Nov 7 '08 at 19:58
  • 3
    Yes. Highly inefficient. There is no reason to use an approach like this when better, faster approaches exist that are just as simple. – PeterAllenWebb Nov 7 '08 at 21:25
  • 1
    not very efficient or effective... Running it N times would likely leave many elements in their original position. – NSjonas Dec 7 '12 at 21:46

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