2

(Eclipse Luna)

Say I have the following "Project A":

Project A
    a.b.c.package1
        One.java
        Two.java
        Three.java
    a.b.c.package2
        Four.java
        Five.java

And I have another "Project B" that attempts to serve as an experimentation project that uses Project A as a dependency. So Project B depends upon Project A in the project settings. Project B looks like this:

Project B
    x.y.z.package3
        Main.java

(which then uses many of the classes in project A, and Main.java contains application main() routine).

This of course works fine. However, what if I want project B to experiment with changing a class from project A, and have it replace it entirely. Such as:

Project B
    x.y.z.package3
        Main.java
    a.b.c.package2
        Four.java      <-----this is to replace the Four.java in Project A

....and have Project A's Four.java be completely ignored by everything so long as I'm "in" Project B. So if Five.java refers to Four.java, it actually is referring to Project B's Four, etc.

Can this be done?

  • This is not an eclipse specific problem. Overriding whole classes rely on the mechanism of how the classes are ordered in the classpath and loaded at runtime. You would need to write your own classloader... – noone Dec 6 '14 at 13:50
  • Why do you do this? I mean what are you trying to do. – outdev Dec 6 '14 at 14:01
  • @noone, no not the classloader specifically. And this is an eclipse issue: The relationship between classes is still under control of eclipse, not the underlying JDK. The JDK need not know what is in what package at all outside of what eclipse hands to it. And it's not the concept of a directory, because some IDE's don't use the nominal "directory is the package" at all. I was able to accomplish such "overriding" similar to this in Visual Cafe for Java in the late 90's. – user4229245 Dec 6 '14 at 15:18
  • 1
    I am trying to understand...If Project B's Five.java refers to Four.java, what do you want to happen. – outdev Dec 6 '14 at 15:26
  • 1
    I mean Project B...I copy pasted your last sentence in the question. – outdev Dec 6 '14 at 15:33
2

So you will have two Four.class files in your classpath. When jvm needs a class it will use first it can find, if multiple classes with same fully qualified name on the classpath. So if you want Project A's Five.java to refer Project B' Four.java, you have to make Project B classes to be first in the classpath.
In eclipse go to

Project B Properties > Build Path > "Order and Export"

enter image description here

Use Up/Down buttons to move Project B above Project A, that way ProjectB will be first in the claspath.

  • Ok, thanks SO MUCH for your help. I'm a bit confused about this though, because now it seems to be working without doing anything at all to the order&export panel. Also, I don't see what you're seeing (B/src), I just see project names. Further confusion: How come this is working now and it didn't previously? I tested all of this before asking my question. Had it simply "worked" with the B/Four overriding the A/Four I wouldn't have come here in the first place. This is behaving how VisualCafe seems to IIRC, which is ideal. – user4229245 Dec 6 '14 at 16:49
  • 1
    @tgm1024 The way I understood it you want to override a class from Project A in Project B. Project B should always be first in the classpath by default (the classpath of project B, that is). Project A should come after that. That's why you actually shouldn't need to change anything. – noone Dec 6 '14 at 16:58
  • @noone, yeah, I was operating under that assumption, but got an error message, hence me showing up here in the first place. Something akin to "expecting a.b.c.Four and got a.b.c.Four", but more in type mismatch speak. I honestly don't understand this. I was similarly goofed up by a dependency project required to be actively open to be seen, but this isn't that. I'm REALLY uncomfortable with things that seem nondeterministic, even if it is in reality a cockpit error. – user4229245 Dec 6 '14 at 17:16
  • Gentlemen, don't get me wrong: I'm assuming this is my fault. I just don't like not understanding it, and I can't seem to replicate the mistake either. – user4229245 Dec 6 '14 at 17:17
  • 1
    I created two projects with names "A" and "B". The "Order and Export" view display project, and its dependencies, as project names. Their order correspond to their order in the classpath at runtime. By default "B" was first, and "A" was second, (dependencies always follow). Its interesting how to manage to get default behavior like they are swapped. – outdev Dec 6 '14 at 20:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy