295

Can anyone tell me how to round a double value to x number of decimal places in Swift?

I have:

var totalWorkTimeInHours = (totalWorkTime/60/60)

With totalWorkTime being an NSTimeInterval (double) in second.

totalWorkTimeInHours will give me the hours, but it gives me the amount of time in such a long precise number e.g. 1.543240952039......

How do I round this down to, say, 1.543 when I print totalWorkTimeInHours?

  • See my answer to find up to 9 different ways to round a double using Darwin round(_:), Double round(), NSString initializer, String initializer, NumberFormatter, Double extension or even NSDecimalNumber and Decimal. – Imanou Petit Feb 7 '18 at 18:10

22 Answers 22

304

You can use Swift's round function to accomplish this.

To round a Double with 3 digits precision, first multiply it by 1000, round it and divide the rounded result by 1000:

let x = 1.23556789
let y = Double(round(1000*x)/1000)
print(y)  // 1.236

Other than any kind of printf(...) or String(format: ...) solutions, the result of this operation is still of type Double.

EDIT:
Regarding the comments that it sometimes does not work, please read this:

What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic

  • For some reasons it doesn't help.. I am using this in the following case TransformOf<Double, String>(fromJSON: {Double(round(($0! as NSString).doubleValue * 100)/100)}, toJSON: {"($0)"}) – Fawkes Jul 30 '15 at 22:50
  • 26
    Doesn't work for me in playground: let rate = 9.94999999999; Double(round(rate * 100) / 100); Output: 9.94999999999, 9.949999999999999 Only works for print but how can I assign it to variable? – Sasha Kid May 5 '16 at 8:53
  • You should use Decimal for this, not plain Doubles. – csotiriou Dec 12 '16 at 16:08
  • 5
    "What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic" is 73 pages long. What's the TL;DR on that? :) – JaredH Apr 14 '18 at 21:45
  • 1
    @HardikDG I don't remember, sorry :-) – Sasha Kid Oct 4 '18 at 10:59
379

Extension for Swift 2

A more general solution is the following extension, which works with Swift 2 & iOS 9:

extension Double {
    /// Rounds the double to decimal places value
    func roundToPlaces(places:Int) -> Double {
        let divisor = pow(10.0, Double(places))
        return round(self * divisor) / divisor
    }
}


Extension for Swift 3

In Swift 3 round is replaced by rounded:

extension Double {
    /// Rounds the double to decimal places value
    func rounded(toPlaces places:Int) -> Double {
        let divisor = pow(10.0, Double(places))
        return (self * divisor).rounded() / divisor
    }
}


Example which returns Double rounded to 4 decimal places:

let x = Double(0.123456789).roundToPlaces(4)  // x becomes 0.1235 under Swift 2
let x = Double(0.123456789).rounded(toPlaces: 4)  // Swift 3 version
  • 14
    The nature of Swift's Double appears to be that it can be imprecise – because of the way it's stored/accessed in binary, even using this rounding function will not return a number rounded to 3 decimal places: e.g., round(8.46 * pow(10.0, 3.0)) / pow(10.0, 3.0) returns 8.460000000000001. Doing the same with Float, at least in this scenario, does in fact seem to work: round(Float(8.46) * pow(10.0, 3.0)) / pow(10.0, 3.0) yields 8.46. Just something worth noting. – Ben Saufley Jul 7 '16 at 21:51
  • 1
    Unfortunately, this no longer works in Swift 3, I am getting this error No '*' candidates produce the expected contextual result type 'FloatingPointRoundingRule' – Koen Aug 20 '16 at 19:44
  • 2
    I updated the solution and added an extension for Swift 3. – Sebastian Aug 22 '16 at 10:26
  • 2
    To be more swift 3... you should change for func rounded(toPlaces places: Int) -> Double – FouZ Sep 7 '16 at 13:11
  • 2
    @BenSaufley But it also does not work if you enter 98.68. In this case, I get 98.6800003 – Alexander Khitev Dec 21 '16 at 8:31
247

Use the String constructor which takes a format string:

print(String(format: "%.3f", totalWorkTimeInHours))
  • 19
    That's truncation, not rounding – Eyeball Dec 7 '14 at 8:10
  • 20
    @Eyeball: Actually, it DOES round. It is the same behaviour as the C printf functionality, which rounds to the requested digits. So String(format: "%.3f", 1.23489) prints 1.235 – zisoft Dec 7 '14 at 8:30
  • 5
    The original poster is looking for a numeric value to use, not a string to display. – pr1001 Feb 16 '16 at 17:28
  • 14
    @pr1001, perhaps so, but that wasn't clear at the time and 46 others have found my answer useful. Stack Overflow is more than just helping the OP. – vacawama Feb 16 '16 at 17:44
  • 3
    odd, this is returning 0.00 every time. – Eric H Jun 23 '16 at 23:18
171

With Swift 4.2, according to your needs, you can choose one of the 9 following styles in order to have a rounded result from a Double.


#1. Using FloatingPoint rounded() method

In the simplest case, you may use the Double round() method.

let roundedValue1 = (0.6844 * 1000).rounded() / 1000
let roundedValue2 = (0.6849 * 1000).rounded() / 1000
print(roundedValue1) // returns 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // returns 0.685

#2. Using FloatingPoint rounded(_:) method

var roundedValue1 = (0.6844 * 1000).rounded(.toNearestOrEven) / 1000
var roundedValue2 = (0.6849 * 1000).rounded(.toNearestOrEven) / 1000
print(roundedValue1) // returns 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // returns 0.685

#3. Using Darwin round function

Foundation offers a round function via Darwin.

import Foundation

let roundedValue1 = round(0.6844 * 1000) / 1000
let roundedValue2 = round(0.6849 * 1000) / 1000
print(roundedValue1) // returns 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // returns 0.685

#4. Using a Double extension custom method builded with Darwin round and pow functions

If you want to repeat the previous operation many times, refactoring your code can be a good idea.

import Foundation

extension Double {
    func roundToDecimal(_ fractionDigits: Int) -> Double {
        let multiplier = pow(10, Double(fractionDigits))
        return Darwin.round(self * multiplier) / multiplier
    }
}

let roundedValue1 = 0.6844.roundToDecimal(3)
let roundedValue2 = 0.6849.roundToDecimal(3)
print(roundedValue1) // returns 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // returns 0.685

#5. Using NSDecimalNumber rounding(accordingToBehavior:) method

If needed, NSDecimalNumber offers a verbose but powerful solution for rounding decimal numbers.

import Foundation

let scale: Int16 = 3

let behavior = NSDecimalNumberHandler(roundingMode: .plain, scale: scale, raiseOnExactness: false, raiseOnOverflow: false, raiseOnUnderflow: false, raiseOnDivideByZero: true)

let roundedValue1 = NSDecimalNumber(value: 0.6844).rounding(accordingToBehavior: behavior)
let roundedValue2 = NSDecimalNumber(value: 0.6849).rounding(accordingToBehavior: behavior)

print(roundedValue1) // returns 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // returns 0.685

#6. Using NSDecimalRound(_:_:_:_:) function

import Foundation

let scale = 3

var value1 = Decimal(0.6844)
var value2 = Decimal(0.6849)

var roundedValue1 = Decimal()
var roundedValue2 = Decimal()

NSDecimalRound(&roundedValue1, &value1, scale, NSDecimalNumber.RoundingMode.plain)
NSDecimalRound(&roundedValue2, &value2, scale, NSDecimalNumber.RoundingMode.plain)

print(roundedValue1) // returns 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // returns 0.685

#7. Using NSString init(format:arguments:) initializer

If you want to return a NSString from your rounding operation, using NSString initializer is a simple but efficient solution.

import Foundation

let roundedValue1 = NSString(format: "%.3f", 0.6844)
let roundedValue2 = NSString(format: "%.3f", 0.6849)
print(roundedValue1) // prints 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // prints 0.685

#8. Using String init(format:_:) initializer

Swift’s String type is bridged with Foundation’s NSString class (you can learn more about it by reading The Swift Programming Language). Therefore, you can use the following code in order to return a String from your rounding operation:

import Foundation

let roundedValue1 = String(format: "%.3f", 0.6844)
let roundedValue2 = String(format: "%.3f", 0.6849)
print(roundedValue1) // prints 0.684
print(roundedValue2) // prints 0.685

#9. Using NumberFormatter

If you expect to get a String? from your rounding operation, NumberFormatter offers a highly customizable solution.

import Foundation

let formatter = NumberFormatter()
formatter.numberStyle = NumberFormatter.Style.decimal
formatter.roundingMode = NumberFormatter.RoundingMode.halfUp
formatter.maximumFractionDigits = 3

let roundedValue1 = formatter.string(from: 0.6844)
let roundedValue2 = formatter.string(from: 0.6849)
print(String(describing: roundedValue1)) // prints Optional("0.684")
print(String(describing: roundedValue2)) // prints Optional("0.685")
  • 1
    Great answer. I might suggest on #5 that you might consider using Decimal, which is toll free bridged to NSDecimalNumber. Decimal is Swift’s native type and offers more elegant support for native operators like +, -, etc. – Rob Feb 5 '18 at 17:40
  • @Rob I've updated my answer with NSDecimalRound(_:_:_:_:) function. Thanks. – Imanou Petit Feb 7 '18 at 18:13
  • Has someone ran performance tests? – Ivan Smetanin Feb 14 '18 at 12:48
  • Using #9 choice will guarantee that you will expect the fixed fraction (number of precision digits), lets say decimal number 43.12345 and fraction = 6, you get 43.123450 – Almas Adilbek Apr 20 '18 at 17:11
  • @ImanouPetit Thank you for posting this. I can nuke a couple of extensions. – Adrian Jun 3 '18 at 0:35
84

In Swift 2.0 and Xcode 7.2:

let pi: Double = 3.14159265358979
String(format:"%.2f", pi)

Example:

enter image description here

26

Building on Yogi's answer, here's a Swift function that does the job:

func roundToPlaces(value:Double, places:Int) -> Double {
    let divisor = pow(10.0, Double(places))
    return round(value * divisor) / divisor
}
18

This is fully worked code

Swift 3.0/4.0 , Xcode 9.0 GM/9.2

 let doubleValue : Double = 123.32565254455
 self.lblValue.text = String(format:"%.f", doubleValue)
 print(self.lblValue.text)

output - 123

 self.lblValue_1.text = String(format:"%.1f", doubleValue)
 print(self.lblValue_1.text)

output - 123.3

 self.lblValue_2.text = String(format:"%.2f", doubleValue)
 print(self.lblValue_2.text)

output - 123.33

 self.lblValue_3.text = String(format:"%.3f", doubleValue)
 print(self.lblValue_3.text)

output - 123.326

  • one line?, seems like 3 lines ;) – Petter Friberg Sep 27 '17 at 12:36
  • hahaha That is right @petter, u can understand what i means to say... – Krunal Patel Sep 28 '17 at 4:29
16

The code for specific digits after decimals is:

var a = 1.543240952039
var roundedString = String(format: "%.3f", a)

Here the %.3f tells the swift to make this number rounded to 3 decimal places.and if you want double number, you may use this code:

// String to Double

var roundedString = Double(String(format: "%.3f", b))

  • You only repeat what was already said by @imanou-petit. – dr0i Feb 10 '18 at 9:45
  • 2
    @dr0i I did not read all the answers... – Ramazan Karami Feb 12 '18 at 5:26
15

In Swift 3.0 and Xcode 8.0:

 extension Double {
        func roundTo(places: Int) -> Double {
            let divisor = pow(10.0, Double(places))
            return (self * divisor).rounded() / divisor
        }
    }

Use this extension like this,

let doubleValue = 3.567
let roundedValue = doubleValue.roundTo(places: 2)
print(roundedValue) // prints 3.56
9

A handy way can be the use of extension of type Double

extension Double {
    var roundTo2f: Double {return Double(round(100 *self)/100)  }
    var roundTo3f: Double {return Double(round(1000*self)/1000) }
}

Usage:

let regularPie:  Double = 3.14159
var smallerPie:  Double = regularPie.roundTo3f  // results 3.142
var smallestPie: Double = regularPie.roundTo2f  // results 3.14
9

Use the built in Foundation Darwin library

SWIFT 3

extension Double {

    func round(to places: Int) -> Double {
        let divisor = pow(10.0, Double(places))
        return Darwin.round(self * divisor) / divisor
    }

}

Usage:

let number:Double = 12.987654321
print(number.round(to: 3)) 

Outputs: 12.988

9

Swift 4, Xcode 10

yourLabel.text =  String(format:"%.2f", yourDecimalValue)
  • No clue why this working solution was downvoted – Naishta Jan 22 at 21:29
  • I didn't downvote, but I think the reason might be because this is returning a string representation of a number, not the number. Which is fine if that's all you need but you might want the number itself rounded off for further use. The OP did say "when I print" so I do think this is an acceptable, easy, and clean solution in this case. – Ben Stahl Feb 19 at 21:07
  • Got it, thanks for the details Ben ! appreciate it – Naishta Feb 20 at 7:19
7

This is a sort of a long workaround, which may come in handy if your needs are a little more complex. You can use a number formatter in Swift.

let numberFormatter: NSNumberFormatter = {
    let nf = NSNumberFormatter()
    nf.numberStyle = .DecimalStyle
    nf.minimumFractionDigits = 0
    nf.maximumFractionDigits = 1
    return nf
}()

Suppose your variable you want to print is

var printVar = 3.567

This will make sure it is returned in the desired format:

numberFormatter.StringFromNumber(printVar)

The result here will thus be "3.6" (rounded). While this is not the most economic solution, I give it because the OP mentioned printing (in which case a String is not undesirable), and because this class allows for multiple parameters to be set.

  • A quick note that any formatter is rather expensive programmatically, making it ill-advised for tasks that need to be performed quickly or repetitively. – Jonathan Thornton Aug 7 '17 at 20:13
7

I would use

print(String(format: "%.3f", totalWorkTimeInHours))

and change .3f to any number of decimal numbers you need

  • He wanted to print with 3 digits, not to get it in NSTimeInterval – Mohsen Hossein pour Nov 1 '16 at 18:28
  • he is just trying to give logic !!! – Surjeet Rajput Dec 8 '16 at 7:50
6

Not Swift but I'm sure you get the idea.

pow10np = pow(10,num_places);
val = round(val*pow10np) / pow10np;
6

This is more flexible algorithm of rounding to N significant digits

Swift 3 solution

extension Double {
// Rounds the double to 'places' significant digits
  func roundTo(places:Int) -> Double {
    guard self != 0.0 else {
        return 0
    }
    let divisor = pow(10.0, Double(places) - ceil(log10(fabs(self))))
    return (self * divisor).rounded() / divisor
  }
}


// Double(0.123456789).roundTo(places: 2) = 0.12
// Double(1.23456789).roundTo(places: 2) = 1.2
// Double(1234.56789).roundTo(places: 2) = 1200
6

Either:

  1. Using String(format:):

    • Typecast Double to String with %.3f format specifier and then back to Double

      Double(String(format: "%.3f", 10.123546789))!
      
    • Or extend Double to handle N-Decimal places:

      extension Double {
          func rounded(toDecimalPlaces n: Int) -> Double {
              return Double(String(format: "%.\(n)f", self))!
          }
      }
      
  2. By calculation

    • multiply with 10^3, round it and then divide by 10^3...

      (1000 * 10.123546789).rounded()/1000
      
    • Or extend Double to handle N-Decimal places:

      extension Double {    
          func rounded(toDecimalPlaces n: Int) -> Double {
              let multiplier = pow(10, Double(n))
              return (multiplier * self).rounded()/multiplier
          }
      }
      
5

The best way to format a double property is to use the Apple predefined methods.

mutating func round(_ rule: FloatingPointRoundingRule)

FloatingPointRoundingRule is a enum which has following possibilities

Enumeration Cases:

case awayFromZero Round to the closest allowed value whose magnitude is greater than or equal to that of the source.

case down Round to the closest allowed value that is less than or equal to the source.

case toNearestOrAwayFromZero Round to the closest allowed value; if two values are equally close, the one with greater magnitude is chosen.

case toNearestOrEven Round to the closest allowed value; if two values are equally close, the even one is chosen.

case towardZero Round to the closest allowed value whose magnitude is less than or equal to that of the source.

case up Round to the closest allowed value that is greater than or equal to the source.

var aNumber : Double = 5.2
aNumber.rounded(.up) // 6.0
5

round a double value to x number of decimal
NO. of digits after decimal

var x = 1.5657676754
var y = (x*10000).rounded()/10000
print(y)  // 1.5658 

var x = 1.5657676754 
var y = (x*100).rounded()/100
print(y)  // 1.57 

var x = 1.5657676754
var y = (x*10).rounded()/10
print(y)  // 1.6
  • What is going on this code? What do the three examples demonstrate? – rene Aug 26 '17 at 8:01
  • Code only answers are not helpful, please try to explain what each of these examples does. – Mo Abdul-Hameed Aug 26 '17 at 9:03
5

If you want to round Double values, you might want to use Swift Decimal so you don't introduce any errors that can crop up when trying to math with these rounded values. If you use Decimal, it can accurately represent decimal values of that rounded floating point value.

So you can do:

extension Double {
    /// Convert `Double` to `Decimal`, rounding it to `scale` decimal places.
    ///
    /// - Parameters:
    ///   - scale: How many decimal places to round to. Defaults to `0`.
    ///   - mode:  The preferred rounding mode. Defaults to `.plain`.
    /// - Returns: The rounded `Decimal` value.

    func roundedDecimal(to scale: Int = 0, mode: NSDecimalNumber.RoundingMode = .plain) -> Decimal {
        var decimalValue = Decimal(self)
        var result = Decimal()
        NSDecimalRound(&result, &decimalValue, scale, mode)
        return result
    }
}

Then, you can get the rounded Decimal value like so:

let foo = 427.3000000002
let value = foo.roundedDecimal(to: 2) // results in 427.30

And if you want to display it with a specified number of decimal places (as well as localize the string for the user's current locale), you can use a NumberFormatter:

let formatter = NumberFormatter()
formatter.maximumFractionDigits = 2
formatter.minimumFractionDigits = 2

if let string = formatter.string(for: value) {
    print(string)
}
  • 1
    The best answer so far. – Satnam Sync Sep 23 '18 at 11:29
  • (4.81).roundedDecimal(to: 2, mode: .down) will return 4.8 instead of 4.81, use Decimal(string: self.description)! for a precise decimalValue – vk.edward.li Nov 22 '18 at 20:16
  • @vk.edward.li - Yes, one should be wary about rounding decimals up/down, because values like 4.81 simply can not be accurately represented with Double (it becomes 4.8099999999999996). But I'd advise against using description (as the rounding it employs is not documented and is subject to change). If you really want to be doing decimal-accurate math, you should avoid Double entirely and should instead use Decimal directly (e.g. Decimal(sign: .plus, exponent: -2, significand: 481) or Decimal(string: "4.81"). But don't use description. – Rob Nov 26 '18 at 1:08
  • @Rob usually it is impossible to get the string value of "4.81" if it is stored as Double, so you have to use self.description (a modified Grisu2 algorithm) to fix the precision which is already lost – vk.edward.li Dec 10 '18 at 11:54
  • I understand your point. I just disagree with your solution. The rounding behavior of description method is neither documented nor guaranteed. Plus, it’s not localized. IMHO, it’s a mistake to use description for anything other than logging purposes. I’d either use Decimal throughout, avoiding using Double entirely, or just use a different rounding mode. Or, if you must, use your own localized method that uses Grisu-style algorithm (but that seems unnecessary when you know to how many decimal places you want to round). But I’d avoid relying on this ancillary behavior of description. – Rob Dec 12 '18 at 16:16
1

I found this wondering if it is possible to correct a user's input. That is if they enter three decimals instead of two for a dollar amount. Say 1.111 instead of 1.11 can you fix it by rounding? The answer for many reasons is no! With money anything over i.e. 0.001 would eventually cause problems in a real checkbook.

Here is a function to check the users input for too many values after the period. But which will allow 1., 1.1 and 1.11.

It is assumed that the value has already been checked for successful conversion from a String to a Double.

//func need to be where transactionAmount.text is in scope

func checkDoublesForOnlyTwoDecimalsOrLess()->Bool{


    var theTransactionCharacterMinusThree: Character = "A"
    var theTransactionCharacterMinusTwo: Character = "A"
    var theTransactionCharacterMinusOne: Character = "A"

    var result = false

    var periodCharacter:Character = "."


    var myCopyString = transactionAmount.text!

    if myCopyString.containsString(".") {

         if( myCopyString.characters.count >= 3){
                        theTransactionCharacterMinusThree = myCopyString[myCopyString.endIndex.advancedBy(-3)]
         }

        if( myCopyString.characters.count >= 2){
            theTransactionCharacterMinusTwo = myCopyString[myCopyString.endIndex.advancedBy(-2)]
        }

        if( myCopyString.characters.count > 1){
            theTransactionCharacterMinusOne = myCopyString[myCopyString.endIndex.advancedBy(-1)]
        }


          if  theTransactionCharacterMinusThree  == periodCharacter {

                            result = true
          }


        if theTransactionCharacterMinusTwo == periodCharacter {

            result = true
        }



        if theTransactionCharacterMinusOne == periodCharacter {

            result = true
        }

    }else {

        //if there is no period and it is a valid double it is good          
        result = true

    }

    return result


}
1
//find the distance between two points
let coordinateSource = CLLocation(latitude: 30.7717625, longitude:76.5741449 )
let coordinateDestination = CLLocation(latitude: 29.9810859, longitude: 76.5663599)
let distanceInMeters = coordinateSource.distance(from: coordinateDestination)
let valueInKms = distanceInMeters/1000
let preciseValueUptoThreeDigit = Double(round(1000*valueInKms)/1000)
self.lblTotalDistance.text = "Distance is : \(preciseValueUptoThreeDigit) kms"

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