83

I'm trying to mutate a new variable from sort of row calculation, say rowSums as below

iris %>% 
  mutate_(sumVar = 
            iris %>% 
            select(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width) %>%
            rowSums)

the result is that "sumVar" is truncated to its first value(10.2):

Source: local data frame [150 x 6]
Groups: <by row>

   Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width Species sumVar
1           5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2  setosa   10.2
2           4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2  setosa   10.2
3           4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2  setosa   10.2
4           4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2  setosa   10.2
5           5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2  setosa   10.2
6           5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4  setosa   10.2
..
Warning message:
Truncating vector to length 1 

Should it be rowwise applied? Or what's the right verb to use in these kind of calculations.

Edit:

More specifically, is there any way to realize the inline custom function with dplyr?

I'm wondering if it is possible do something like:

iris %>% 
  mutate(sumVar = colsum_function(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width))
3
  • 5
    Really strange that iris %>% select(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width) %>% rowSums() works fine but iris %>% mutate(sumVar = iris %>% select(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width) %>% rowSums()) throws a "Error: Bad indices 1" + warning message.
    – talat
    Commented Dec 8, 2014 at 9:38
  • I am trying to work on it with different approaches, but this error appears very frequently using . (I am also doing something silly sometimes). Commented Dec 8, 2014 at 9:49
  • 3
    For operations like sum that already have an efficient vectorised row-wise alternative, the proper way is currently: df %>% mutate(total = rowSums(across(where(is.numeric)))) across can take anything that select can (e.g. rowSums(across(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width)) also works). See the full spiel about row-wise and across
    – Fons MA
    Commented Apr 15, 2021 at 8:46

7 Answers 7

145

This is more of a workaround but could be used

iris %>% mutate(sumVar = rowSums(.[1:4]))

As written in comments, you can also use a select inside of mutate to get the columns you want to sum up, for example

iris %>% 
  mutate(sumVar = rowSums(select(., contains("Sepal")))) %>% 
  head 

or

iris %>% 
  mutate(sumVar = select(., contains("Sepal")) %>% rowSums()) %>% 
  head
7
  • 1
    Which version of dplyr are you using? When I try you example with dplyr_0.4.1, I receive an exception: Error in is.data.frame(x) : object '.' not found.
    – Jubbles
    Commented May 7, 2015 at 19:19
  • 3
    If it's of use to anyone, the reason why I was receiving the error Error in is.data.frame(x) : object '.' not found was because I had an old version of magrittr. When I updated from magrittr_1.0.1 to magrittr_1.5, everything worked fine.
    – Jubbles
    Commented May 7, 2015 at 19:37
  • 12
    @Konrad, you could do something like iris %>% mutate(sumVar = rowSums(select(., contains("Sepal")))) %>% head or iris %>% mutate(sumVar = select(., contains("Sepal")) %>% rowSums()) %>% head
    – talat
    Commented Feb 28, 2016 at 21:23
  • 2
    The comment by @docendodiscimus really should be another (vote-able) answer. It is the most robust dplyr-esque solution.
    – D. Woods
    Commented Apr 28, 2016 at 4:32
  • 1
    It's nice that this works, although Hadley says that a solution like this "works by coincidence, not by design. I wouldn't rely on it." But maybe it is supported now? Does anyone know? github.com/tidyverse/dplyr/issues/2050
    – Melkor.cz
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 19:22
24

You can use rowwise() function:

iris %>% 
  rowwise() %>% 
  mutate(sumVar = sum(c_across(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width)))

#> # A tibble: 150 x 6
#> # Rowwise: 
#>    Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width Species sumVar
#>           <dbl>       <dbl>        <dbl>       <dbl> <fct>    <dbl>
#>  1          5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2 setosa    10.2
#>  2          4.9         3            1.4         0.2 setosa     9.5
#>  3          4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2 setosa     9.4
#>  4          4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2 setosa     9.4
#>  5          5           3.6          1.4         0.2 setosa    10.2
#>  6          5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4 setosa    11.4
#>  7          4.6         3.4          1.4         0.3 setosa     9.7
#>  8          5           3.4          1.5         0.2 setosa    10.1
#>  9          4.4         2.9          1.4         0.2 setosa     8.9
#> 10          4.9         3.1          1.5         0.1 setosa     9.6
#> # ... with 140 more rows

"c_across() uses tidy selection syntax so you can to succinctly select many variables"'

Finally, if you want, you can use %>% ungroup at the end to exit from rowwise.

3
  • 16
    For operations like sum that already have an efficient vectorised row-wise alternative, the proper way is currently: df %>% mutate(total = rowSums(across(where(is.numeric)))) across can take anything that select can (e.g. rowSums(across(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width)) also works). Scroll down the row-wise vignette to find this and have a look at across
    – Fons MA
    Commented Apr 15, 2021 at 8:52
  • @FonsMA this should rather be an answer, and even an accepted answer, than a comment Commented Jan 10, 2023 at 9:15
  • @DanChaltiel, thanks, I didn't see the comment had this many upvotes! it's now an answer below
    – Fons MA
    Commented Jan 13, 2023 at 0:45
12

A more complicated way would be:

 iris %>% select(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width) %>%
mutate(sumVar = rowSums(.)) %>% left_join(iris)
2
  • Thanks Davide. left_join sounds a nice solution if using it with by key; however, it's not so robust and intuitive for this circumstance
    – leoluyi
    Commented Dec 10, 2014 at 6:29
  • I also worry the automatic "by" parameter selection in the join could cause some troubles.. the columns could contain non-unique values on some rows ..
    – Melkor.cz
    Commented Mar 12, 2018 at 19:09
11

Adding @docendodiscimus's comment as an answer. +1 to him!

iris %>% mutate(sumVar = rowSums(select(., contains("Sepal"))))
7

As requested, transforming my commment into an answer:

For operations like sum that already have an efficient vectorised row-wise alternative, the proper way is currently:

df %>% mutate(total = rowSums(across(where(is.numeric))))

across can take anything that select can (e.g. rowSums(across(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width)) also works).

Scroll down the row-wise vignette to find this and have a look at across

3

I am using this simple solution, which is a more robust modification of the answer by Davide Passaretti:

iris %>% select(Sepal.Length:Petal.Width) %>%
  transmute(sumVar = rowSums(.)) %>% bind_cols(iris, .)

(But it requires a defined row order, which should be fine, unless you work with remote datasets perhaps..)

2
  • Hi could you please tell me the meaning of dot in between round brackets? rowSums(.)
    – Daman deep
    Commented Sep 7, 2021 at 16:04
  • The dot represents the result coming out of the %>% pipe
    – Melkor.cz
    Commented Mar 16, 2022 at 13:31
1

You can also use a grep in place of contains or matches, just in case you need to get fancy with the regular expressions (matches doesn't seem to much like negative lookaheads and the like in my experience).

iris %>% mutate(sumVar = rowSums(select(., grep("Sepal", names(.)))))

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