9

I've made a simple flask application:

Trying 127.0.0.1...
Connected to localhost.
Escape character is '^]'.
GET / HTTP/1.1
host:google.be

HTTP/1.0 404 NOT FOUND
Content-Type: text/html
Content-Length: 233
Server: Werkzeug/0.9.6 Python/2.7.6
Date: Mon, 08 Dec 2014 19:15:43 GMT

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2 Final//EN">
<title>404 Not Found</title>
<h1>Not Found</h1>
<p>The requested URL was not found on the server.  If you entered the URL manually please check your spelling and try again.</p>
Connection closed by foreign host.

One of the things I would like the change is the server header which at the moment is set as Werkzeug/0.9.6 Python/2.7.6 to something my own chosing. But I can't seem to find anything in the documentation on how to do this.

1
  • 5
    Not really germane to what you asked, but in production, I would do this at the web server layer (i.e. apache or nginx). Dec 8, 2014 at 20:09

7 Answers 7

13

You can use Flask's make_response method to add or modify headers.

from flask import make_response

@app.route('/index')
def index():
    resp = make_response("Hello, World!")
    resp.headers['server'] = 'ASD'
    return resp
1
  • 3
    How can I make this header global across all routes?
    – 657784512
    May 28, 2017 at 18:19
8

@bcarroll's answer works but it will bypass other processes defined in original process_response method such as set session cookie. To avoid the above:

class localFlask(Flask):
    def process_response(self, response):
        #Every response will be processed here first
        response.headers['server'] = SERVER_NAME
        super(localFlask, self).process_response(response)
        return(response)
1
  • Wouldn't it be better to set the server header after the call to the superclass' method? For example if one doesn't want to set it, but to delete it, only calling it after would work. Thus it would seem to me a more generic solution Sep 7, 2020 at 13:20
5

You can change the Server header for every response by overriding the Flask.process_response() method.

    from flask import Flask
    from flask import Response

    SERVER_NAME = 'Custom Flask Web Server v0.1.0'

    class localFlask(Flask):
        def process_response(self, response):
            #Every response will be processed here first
            response.headers['server'] = SERVER_NAME
            return(response)

    app = localFlask(__name__)


    @app.route('/')
    def index():
        return('<h2>INDEX</h2>')

    @app.route('/test')
    def test():
        return('<h2>This is a test</h2>')

http://flask.pocoo.org/docs/0.12/api/#flask.Flask.process_response

1
  • 1
    This doesn't seem to work for me.
    – nsde
    Apr 5, 2023 at 9:31
3

Overriding Server header in code does not work if You use production server like gunicorn. The better way is to use proxy server behind gunicorn and there change Server header.

3

TL;DR - overwrite /python3.8/http/server.py send_response method. Comment the server header addition line.

Why? Adding/Manipulating headers in flask (in any way that mentioned above) will fire the response with the configured headers from flask to the web server but the WSGI logic (which happens independently, after & before flask logic) will be the last one to modify those values if any.

In your case(Werkzeug) some headers are hard-coded in python http module which werkzeug depending on. The server header is one of them.

0

Easy way:

@app.after_request
def changeserver(response):
    response.headers['server'] = SERVER_NAME
    return response
1
  • 1
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Nov 28, 2022 at 21:27
0
@app.after_request
def changeserver(response):
    response.headers['server'] = SERVER_NAME
    return response

This only add new Server header, but the original is still here...

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