67

I have a Card component and a CardGroup component, and I'd like to throw an error when CardGroup has children that aren't Card components. Is this possible, or am I trying to solve the wrong problem?

14 Answers 14

64

For React 0.14+ and using ES6 classes, the solution will look like:

class CardGroup extends Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <div>{this.props.children}</div>
    )
  }
}
CardGroup.propTypes = {
  children: function (props, propName, componentName) {
    const prop = props[propName]

    let error = null
    React.Children.forEach(prop, function (child) {
      if (child.type !== Card) {
        error = new Error('`' + componentName + '` children should be of type `Card`.');
      }
    })
    return error
  }
}
10
  • 19
    I don't know why, but child.type === Card isn't working in my setup. However I got it working by using child.type.prototype instanceof Card. My React version is 15.5.4 Jul 11, 2017 at 15:20
  • why not just throw it then and there, instead of returning an Error value. Sep 10, 2017 at 19:03
  • 6
    @user2167582 Because that's the expected API for prop validation functions. Official docs include the following comment in example code: You can also specify a custom validator. It should return an Error object if the validation fails. Don't console.warn or throw, as this won't work inside oneOfType.
    – Diego V
    Sep 11, 2017 at 11:05
  • 5
    Where's the docs of child.type? Can someone send link it please?
    – stevemao
    Sep 21, 2017 at 7:50
  • 1
    @VeikkoKarsikko That's the only thing that worked for me. Thank you! This should be an answer, rather than a comment
    – user310988
    Apr 10, 2018 at 10:29
29

You can use the displayName for each child, accessed via type:

for (child in this.props.children){
  if (this.props.children[child].type.displayName != 'Card'){
    console.log("Warning CardGroup has children that aren't Card components");
  }  
}
10
  • 5
    Make sure to check whether the current environment is development or production. propTypes validation is not triggered in production for performance. Using customProp in propTypes will be helpful.
    – Ryan Rho
    Apr 28, 2015 at 23:43
  • 18
    You shouldn't do this because props.children is an opaque data type. Better use React.Children utilities as shown here.
    – Diego V
    Apr 6, 2016 at 15:51
  • 33
    Keep in mind though, using things like Uglify will break this
    – MoeSattler
    May 12, 2016 at 18:48
  • 5
    That "helped me", but I used name instead of displayName (this last one doesn't worked for me)
    – ArCiGo
    Jan 23, 2018 at 23:03
  • 10
    Never use the displayName since in production it might be stripped out!
    – HaNdTriX
    Feb 5, 2018 at 14:52
15

You can use a custom propType function to validate children, since children are just props. I also wrote an article on this, if you want more details.

var CardGroup = React.createClass({
  propTypes: {
    children: function (props, propName, componentName) {
      var error;
      var prop = props[propName];

      React.Children.forEach(prop, function (child) {
        if (child.type.displayName !== 'Card') {
          error = new Error(
            '`' + componentName + '` only accepts children of type `Card`.'
          );
        }
      });

      return error;
    }
  },

  render: function () {
    return (
      <div>{this.props.children}</div>
    );
  }
});
4
  • Is this syntax still valid with ES2015 and React 0.14.x+? Mar 7, 2016 at 16:07
  • Thanks, @DiegoV. I think you can also declare static propTypes = {} in the class definition. Apr 5, 2016 at 17:29
  • I like that syntax too but class properties are still just a proposal for ES7. Personally I'll wait to see if it gets standardized :)
    – Diego V
    Apr 6, 2016 at 15:38
  • 4
    child.type.displayName isn't working after obfuscation Jul 11, 2017 at 15:18
11

Use the React.Children.forEach method to iterate over the children and use the name property to check the type:

React.Children.forEach(this.props.children, (child) => {
    if (child.type.name !== Card.name) {
        console.error("Only card components allowed as children.");
    }
}

I recommend to use Card.name instead of 'Card' string for better maintenance and stability in respect to uglify.

See: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/name

1
  • 1
    Working only if I change name to displayName if (child.type.displayName !== Card.name)
    – pacocom
    May 26, 2020 at 11:48
10

For those using a TypeScript version. You can filter/modify components like this:

this.modifiedChildren = React.Children.map(children, child => {
            if (React.isValidElement(child) && (child as React.ReactElement<any>).type === Card) {
                let modifiedChild = child as React.ReactElement<any>;
                // Modifying here
                return modifiedChild;
            }
            // Returning other components / string.
            // Delete next line in case you dont need them.
            return child;
        });
5

One has to use "React.isValidElement(child)" along with "child.type" if one is working with Typescript in order to avoid type mismatch errors.

React.Children.forEach(props.children, (child, index) => {
  if (React.isValidElement(child) && child.type !== Card) {
    error = new Error(
      '`' + componentName + '` only accepts children of type `Card`.'
    );
  }
});
1
  • I have an error with this code: [ts] This condition will always return 'false' since the types 'string | ComponentClass<{}, any> | StatelessComponent<{}>' and 'typeof MyChildClass' have no overlap. [2367] Jan 9, 2019 at 10:14
4

I made a custom PropType for this that I call equalTo. You can use it like this...

class MyChildComponent extends React.Component { ... }

class MyParentComponent extends React.Component {
  static propTypes = {
    children: PropTypes.arrayOf(PropTypes.equalTo(MyChildComponent))
  }
}

Now, MyParentComponent only accepts children that are MyChildComponent. You can check for html elements like this...

PropTypes.equalTo('h1')
PropTypes.equalTo('div')
PropTypes.equalTo('img')
...

Here is the implementation...

React.PropTypes.equalTo = function (component) {
  return function validate(propValue, key, componentName, location, propFullName) {
    const prop = propValue[key]
    if (prop.type !== component) {
      return new Error(
        'Invalid prop `' + propFullName + '` supplied to' +
        ' `' + componentName + '`. Validation failed.'
      );
    }
  };
}

You could easily extend this to accept one of many possible types. Maybe something like...

React.PropTypes.equalToOneOf = function (arrayOfAcceptedComponents) {
...
}
4
static propTypes = {

  children : (props, propName, componentName) => {
              const prop = props[propName];
              return React.Children
                       .toArray(prop)
                       .find(child => child.type !== Card) && new Error(`${componentName} only accepts "<Card />" elements`);
  },

}
4

You can add a prop to your Card component and then check for this prop in your CardGroup component. This is the safest way to achieve this in React.

This prop can be added as a defaultProp so it's always there.

class Card extends Component {

  static defaultProps = {
    isCard: true,
  }

  render() {
    return (
      <div>A Card</div>
    )
  }
}

class CardGroup extends Component {

  render() {
    for (child in this.props.children) {
      if (!this.props.children[child].props.isCard){
        console.error("Warning CardGroup has a child which isn't a Card component");
      }
    }

    return (
      <div>{this.props.children}</div>
    )
  }
}

Checking for whether the Card component is indeed a Card component by using type or displayName is not safe as it may not work during production use as indicated here: https://github.com/facebook/react/issues/6167#issuecomment-191243709

1
  • 1
    This seems to be the only way I can get this working in a production build. I have a component that clones its children while adding extra props only to those of a certain type.
    – Palisand
    Oct 13, 2017 at 2:47
3

I published the package that allows to validate the types of React elements https://www.npmjs.com/package/react-element-proptypes :

const ElementPropTypes = require('react-element-proptypes');

const Modal = ({ header, items }) => (
    <div>
        <div>{header}</div>
        <div>{items}</div>
    </div>
);

Modal.propTypes = {
    header: ElementPropTypes.elementOfType(Header).isRequired,
    items: React.PropTypes.arrayOf(ElementPropTypes.elementOfType(Item))
};

// render Modal 
React.render(
    <Modal
       header={<Header title="This is modal" />}
       items={[
           <Item/>,
           <Item/>,
           <Item/>
       ]}
    />,
    rootElement
);
3

To validate correct children component i combine the use of react children foreach and the Custom validation proptypes, so at the end you can have the following:

HouseComponent.propTypes = {
children: PropTypes.oneOfType([(props, propName, componentName) => {
    let error = null;
    const validInputs = [
    'Mother',
    'Girlfried',
    'Friends',
    'Dogs'
    ];
    // Validate the valid inputs components allowed.
    React.Children.forEach(props[propName], (child) => {
            if (!validInputs.includes(child.type.name)) {
                error = new Error(componentName.concat(
                ' children should be one of the type:'
                    .concat(validInputs.toString())
            ));
        }
    });
    return error;
    }]).isRequired
};

As you can see is having and array with the name of the correct type.

On the other hand there is also a function called componentWithName from the airbnb/prop-types library that helps to have the same result. Here you can see more details

HouseComponent.propTypes = {
    children: PropTypes.oneOfType([
        componentWithName('SegmentedControl'),
        componentWithName('FormText'),
        componentWithName('FormTextarea'),
        componentWithName('FormSelect')
    ]).isRequired
};

Hope this help some one :)

3

Considered multiple proposed approaches, but they all turned out to be either unreliable or overcomplicated to serve as a boilerplate. Settled on the following implementation.

class Card extends Component {
  // ...
}

class CardGroup extends Component {
  static propTypes = {
    children: PropTypes.arrayOf(
      (propValue, key, componentName) => (propValue[key].type !== Card)
        ? new Error(`${componentName} only accepts children of type ${Card.name}.`)
        : null
    )
  }
  // ...
}

Here're the key ideas:

  1. Utilize the built-in PropTypes.arrayOf() instead of looping over children
  2. Check the child type via propValue[key].type !== Card in a custom validator
  3. Use variable substitution ${Card.name} to not hard-code the type name

Library react-element-proptypes implements this in ElementPropTypes.elementOfType():

import ElementPropTypes from "react-element-proptypes";

class CardGroup extends Component {
  static propTypes = {
    children: PropTypes.arrayOf(ElementPropTypes.elementOfType(Card))
  }
  // ...
}
2

An easy, production friendly check. At the top of your CardGroup component:

const cardType = (<Card />).type;

Then, when iterating over the children:

React.children.map(child => child.type === cardType ? child : null);

The nice thing about this check is that it will also work with library components/sub-components that don't expose the necessary classes to make an instanceof check work.

0

Assert the type:

props.children.forEach(child =>
  console.assert(
    child.type.name == "CanvasItem",
    "CanvasScroll can only have CanvasItem component as children."
  )
)
1
  • 1
    It's unreliable to iterate over the children prop assuming it's an array. It very well can be null or a single node. React provides handy utilities for handling children, such as React.Children.forEach(). See the official docs reactjs.org/docs/react-api.html#reactchildren Mar 17, 2021 at 1:27

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