25

I have a one to many relationship coming from a stored procedure. I have several one to many relationships in the query and i am trying to map these fields to a C# object. The problem i am having is i get duplicate data because of the one to many relationships. Here is a simplified version of my code:

Here is the objects classes:

public class Person
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Color> FavoriteColors { get; set; }
    public List<Hobby> Hobbies { get; set; }

    public Person()
    {
        FavoriteColors = new List<Color>();
        Hobbies = new List<Hobby>();
    }
}

public class Color
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Hobby
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Here is how I am retrieving the data:

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection("connstring.."))
{
    string sql = @"
                    SELECT 
                        Person.Id AS PersonId, 
                        Person.Name AS PersonName, 
                        Hobby.Id AS HobbyId,
                        Hobby.Name AS HobbyName,
                        Color.Id AS ColorId,
                        Color.Name AS ColorName
                    FROM Person
                    INNER JOIN Color on Person.Id = Color.PersonId
                    INNER JOIN Hobby on Person.Id = Hobby.PersonId";
    using (SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
    {
        using (SqlDataReader reader = comm.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection))
        {
            List<Person> persons = new List<Person>();
            while (reader.Read())
            {
                Person person = new Person();
                //What to do
            }
        }
    }
}

As you can see there can be multiple colors and hobbies for a given Person. Usually, I would use Entity Framework to solve this mapping but we are not allowed to use any orms. Is there a technique to properly unflatten this data?

  • Maybe you can use reflect to build sql and get the result – Jeffrey Zhang Dec 9 '14 at 4:11
  • @JeffreyZhang Hello, I do not know what you mean. What is reflect? And how would building sql me in mapping? Sorry for the questions just trying to understand. – Luke101 Dec 9 '14 at 4:15
  • You will need 3 "select" statements. – Riad Baghbanli Dec 9 '14 at 4:18
  • While iterating on the reader check if the existing row person id exists in the person list. If not create a new person object and declare two separate lists to hold the hobby and color info. For subsequent iterations go on populating these two lists because these will always be the same persons data. One you get to a new record for a new person, add these lists to the person object and start over with a new person object – koder Dec 9 '14 at 4:23
15

The idea is while iterating on the reader check if the existing row person id exists in the person list. If not create a new person object and declare two separate lists to hold the hobby and color info. For subsequent iterations go on populating these two lists because these will always be the same persons data. One you get to a new record for a new person, add these lists to the person object and start over with a new person object

Below is the sample code:

                string sql = @"
                SELECT 
                    Person.Id AS PersonId, 
                    Person.Name AS PersonName, 
                    Hobby.Id AS HobbyId,
                    Hobby.Name AS HobbyName,
                    Color.Id AS ColorId,
                    Color.Name AS ColorName
                FROM Person
                INNER JOIN Color on Person.Id = Color.PersonId
                INNER JOIN Hobby on Person.Id = Hobby.PersonId
                Order By PersonId"; // Order By is required to get the person data sorted as per the person id
            using (SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
            {
                using (SqlDataReader reader = comm.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection))
                {
                    List<Person> persons = new List<Person>();
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        var personId = reader.GetInt32(0);
                        var personName = reader.GetString(1);
                        var hobbyId = reader.GetInt32(3);
                        var hobbyName = reader.GetString(4);
                        var colorId = reader.GetInt32(5);
                        var colorName = reader.GetString(6);

                        var person = persons.Where(p => p.Id == personId).FirstOrDefault();
                        if (person == null)
                        {
                            person = new Person();
                            person.Id = personId;
                            person.Name = personName;

                            hobby = new Hobby() { Id = hobbyId, Name = hobbyName };
                            color = new Color() { Id = colorId, Name = colorName };

                            person.FavoriteColors = new List<Color>();
                            person.Hobbies = new List<Hobby>();

                            person.FavoriteColors.Add(color);
                            person.Hobbies.Add(hobby);

                            persons.Add(person);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            hobby = new Hobby() { Id = hobbyId, Name = hobbyName };
                            color = new Color() { Id = colorId, Name = colorName };

                            //JT Edit: if the colour/hobby doesn't already exists then add it
                            if (!person.FavoriteColors.Contains(color))
                               person.FavoriteColors.Add(color);

                            if (!person.Hobbies.Contains(hobby))
                               person.Hobbies.Add(hobby);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
  • 1
    @JeremyThompson This answer is great. Thanks. – Luke101 Dec 15 '14 at 14:46
12
+25

I think ultimately, all approaches mentioned here work. We could one up the solutions by focusing on performance.

@Mark Menchavez commented on the performance impact of repeatedly going back to the database when we start out with a simple list of persons. For a huge list, this impact is significant and should be avoided as much as possible.

Ultimately, the best thing is to fetch the data in as few chunks as possible; in this instance as one chunk will be ideal (if the joins are not too expensive). Databases are optimized for working on sets of data and we will use this to avoid the overhead of setting up multiple, repeated connections (especially if we are going over the wire to an instance of Sql running on another machine).

I will use @Luke101's approach but just change to the List to a Dictionary of values. The hash look up of keys will be faster than the use of Where in @Koder's response. Also note that I have changed SQL to read as a LEFT JOIN to accommodate those Persons that don't have a Hobby or Color on record and allow them to be returned as NULL (DBNull in .NET).

Also note that because of the shape of the tables and data, it is possible to have Colors and/or Hobbies repeated multiple times, so we do need to check for those too and not just assume there will be one Color and one Hobby.

I didn't bother repeating the classes here.

        public static IEnumerable<Person> DataFetcher(string connString)
    {
        Dictionary<int, Person> personDict = new Dictionary<int,Person>(1024);  //1024 was arbitrarily chosen to reduce the number of resizing operations on the underlying arrays; 
                                                                                //we can rather issue a count first to get the number of rows that will be returned (probably divided by 2).

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connString))
        {
            string sql = @"
                SELECT 
                    Person.Id AS PersonId, 
                    Person.Name AS PersonName, 
                    Hobby.Id AS HobbyId,
                    Hobby.Name AS HobbyName,
                    Color.Id AS ColorId,
                    Color.Name AS ColorName
                FROM Person
                LEFT JOIN Color on Person.Id = Color.PersonId
                LEFT JOIN Hobby on Person.Id = Hobby.PersonId";

            using (SqlCommand comm = new SqlCommand(sql, conn))
            {
                using (SqlDataReader reader = comm.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.CloseConnection))
                {
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        int personId = reader.GetInt32(0);
                        string personName = reader.GetString(1);

                        object hobbyIdObject = reader.GetValue(2);
                        object hobbyNameObject = reader.GetValue(3);
                        object colorIdObject = reader.GetValue(4);
                        object colorNameObject = reader.GetValue(5);

                        Person person;

                        personDict.TryGetValue(personId, out person);

                        if (person == null)
                        {
                            person = new Person
                            {
                                Id = personId,
                                Name = personName,

                                FavoriteColors = new List<Color>(),
                                Hobbies = new List<Hobby>()
                            };

                            personDict[personId] = person;
                        }

                        if (!Convert.IsDBNull(hobbyIdObject))
                        {
                            int hobbyId = Convert.ToInt32(hobbyIdObject);
                            Hobby hobby = person.Hobbies.FirstOrDefault(ent => ent.Id == hobbyId);

                            if (hobby == null)
                            {
                                hobby = new Hobby
                                {
                                    Id = hobbyId,
                                    Name = hobbyNameObject.ToString()
                                };

                                person.Hobbies.Add(hobby);
                            }
                        }

                        if (!Convert.IsDBNull(colorIdObject))
                        {
                            int colorId = Convert.ToInt32(colorIdObject);
                            Color color = person.FavoriteColors.FirstOrDefault(ent => ent.Id == colorId);

                            if (color == null)
                            {
                                color = new Color
                                {
                                    Id = colorId,
                                    Name = colorNameObject.ToString()
                                };

                                person.FavoriteColors.Add(color);
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return personDict.Values;
    }
  • "I have changed SQL to read as a LEFT JOIN to accommodate those Persons that don't have a Hobby or Color on record and allow them to be returned as NULL (DBNull in .NET)." - this could be good and I haven't tried the query though wouldn't the author say if there were NULL people/colours/hobbies in or joined to the FROM Person table? I took it as though they were default values if unspecified. If so all the optimisations you propose would be countered from this mistaken LEFT JOIN optimisation? – Jeremy Thompson Dec 17 '14 at 12:40
  • ps Dont get me wrong, you and your answer are welcome to Stack Overflow :) – Jeremy Thompson Dec 17 '14 at 12:48
  • @JeremyThompson, have you tried the query? I was working with possibility that no record will exist for Color or Hobby, I guess that was taking liberties. The dictates of his application may be that a Person record cannot be saved without at least one of each of those record types. But if they are not compulsory, then the LEFT JOIN will be appropriate to include those Persons without a Hobby or Color. Except if the aim of this query is to retrieve only those that have one or the other. Luke101, do you care to weigh in? Perhaps more detail will allow for better tuning of the Script and flow? – Eniola Dec 18 '14 at 21:19
  • @Eniola Hey, Good Question. You are correct. I should have used Left joins instead. This way All persons will be loaded. If a person does not have a color or a hobby then they will be empty. Now, my real query does use some inner joins so it will be nice to see example code that considers inner joins. – Luke101 Dec 19 '14 at 19:45
5

SqlDataReader supports result set. Try this.

using (SqlConnection connection = new SqlConnection("connection string here"))
        {
            using (SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand
                   ("SELECT Id, Name FROM Person WHERE Id=1; SELECT Id, Name FROM FavoriteColors WHERE PersonId=1;SELECT Id, Name FROM Hobbies WHERE PersonId=1", connection))
            {
                connection.Open();
                using (SqlDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    Person p = new Person();
                    while (reader.Read())
                    {
                        p.Id = reader.GetInteger(0);
                        p.Name = reader.GetString(1);
                    }

                    if (reader.NextResult())
                    {
                        while (reader.Read())
                        {
                            var clr = new Color();
                            clr.Id = reader.GetInteger(0);
                            clr.Name = reader.GetString(1);
                            p.FavoriteColors.Add(clr);
                        }
                    }
                    if (reader.NextResult())
                    {
                        while (reader.Read())
                        {
                            var hby = new Hobby();
                            hby.Id = reader.GetInteger(0);
                            hby.Name = reader.GetString(1);
                            p.Hobbies.Add(clr);
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
  • I like the idea of retrieving multiple result sets per query. How can you expand this solution if you need to retrieve multiple persons? – Mark Menchavez Dec 16 '14 at 8:46
  • Remove where condition or change where condition to retrieve more persons. You may have to do some data manipulation to segregate the data after retrieving. – Ahuman Dec 16 '14 at 12:13
  • How would I use this method if I want only top 10 Persons? – Luke101 Dec 18 '14 at 16:31
  • You can use nested/sub queries. The original question was to handle multiple queries and populate the data model. So I proposed a solution with multiple result set. Now I see the question has changed a little. – Ahuman Dec 19 '14 at 14:14
3

It is probably easier to use 3 separate queries to achieve this.

Person query

SELECT * FROM Person

Then do your while loop on the results of this query.

...
var persons = new List<Person>();
while (reader.Read())
{
    var person = new Person();
    Person.Id = reader.GetInt32(0);
    ... // populate the other Person properties as required

    // Get list of hobbies for this person
    // Use a query to get hobbies for this person id
    // e.g. "SELECT * FROM Hobby WHERE Hobby.PersonId = " + Person.Id

    // Get a list of colours
    // Use a query to get colours for this person id

}
  • This solution will work. I often use this technique provided the list of persons to be retrieved is not huge. The problem with this approach is that you go back and forth the database serveral times foreach user which can impact performance. – Mark Menchavez Dec 16 '14 at 8:12
  • Agreed, there is a performance overhead as this approach involves multiple trips to the data store. This is usually not a problem as most use cases would involve some sort of paging to prevent loading the full list of Persons. I find this approach useful for simple query tasks as I can use generic repository classes to keep the code short and quickly get stuff done. However use cases like reporting or bulk processing should not use this approach. – failedprogramming Dec 23 '14 at 23:15
3

I think the problem is not how to map the retrieved data to an object (for that i would suggest using koders approach), but rather that the select statement is returning too many results.

SELECT 
    Person.Id AS PersonId, 
    Person.Name AS PersonName, 
    Hobby.Id AS HobbyId,
    Hobby.Name AS HobbyName,
    Color.Id AS ColorId,
    Color.Name AS ColorName
FROM Person
INNER JOIN Color on Person.Id = Color.PersonId
INNER JOIN Hobby on Person.Id = Hobby.PersonId";

seems to me like the tables Color and Hobby each contain a PersonId which assigns them to a single unique person. (Thus the Inner join returns i.e. {personId, blue, fishing}, {personId, red, fishing}, {personId, blue, swimming}, {personId, red, swimming}

instead of the desired {personId, red, fishing}, {personId, blue, swimming}

In case i did not missread this, i would suggest to instead add a column ColorId and HobbyId to the table Person. If you did this, you can retrieve your data without redundancy by using

SELECT 
    Person.Id AS PersonId, 
    Person.Name AS PersonName, 
    Hobby.Id AS HobbyId,
    Hobby.Name AS HobbyName,
    Color.Id AS ColorId,
    Color.Name AS ColorName
FROM Person
INNER JOIN Color on Person.ColorId = Color.Id
INNER JOIN Hobby on Person.HobbyId = Hobby.Id";

and koders approach to bind the result to your Person class will give you the desired result.

edit: actually koders code returns the correct result either way due to

if (!person.FavoriteColors.Contains(color))

and

if (!person.Hobbies.Contains(hobby))
  • 1
    Adding the ColorId and HobbyId to the Person table changes the relationship. In the question, each person can have multiple favorite colors and hobbies. In the proposed table structure, each person can now have one color and hobby. – Mark Menchavez Dec 16 '14 at 8:08
  • You are absolutely right - he probably does not want to create multiple datasets with the same personId. It just felt unnatural that you can not assign the same color to multiple persons. – H W Dec 16 '14 at 11:52
2

You could use the query below, which return one row for each person. Colors and Hobbies is returned as xml string, you can parse it in your code.

select p.personId, p.personName
,cast((select colorId,colorName from Color as c where c.personId = p.personId for xml raw) as nvarchar(max)) as Colors
,cast((select hobbyId,hobbyName from Hobby as h where h.personId = p.personId for xml raw) as nvarchar(max)) as Hobbies
from Person as p

you can then use this code to parse the colors

var root = XElement.Parse("<root>" + colorXml + "</root>");
var colors = root.Nodes()
    .Where(n => n.NodeType == XmlNodeType.Element)
    .Select(node =>
    {
        var element = (XElement)node;
        return new Color()
        {
            Id = Convert.ToInt32(element.Attribute("colorId").Value),
            Name = element.Attribute("colorName").Value
        };
    }).ToList();

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