I know @ is for decorators, but what is @= for in Python? Is it just reservation for some future idea?

This is just one of my many questions while reading tokenizer.py.

  • 1
    See cset c553d8f72d65 (GitHub mirror...easier to read) in the CPython repo. – Nick T Dec 9 '14 at 20:10
  • SymbolHound is a search-engine which can search on punctuation symbols. However searching on @= python doesn't currently return relevant results, because Python 3.5 documentation contains '@' but not an example of '@=' anywhere. I sent SH a message to help improve that. Python doc could improve too. – smci Mar 5 '17 at 10:42
up vote 157 down vote accepted

From the documentation:

The @ (at) operator is intended to be used for matrix multiplication. No builtin Python types implement this operator.

The @ operator was introduced in Python 3.5. @= is matrix multiplication followed by assignment, as you would expect. They map to __matmul__, __rmatmul__ or __imatmul__ similar to how + and += map to __add__, __radd__ or __iadd__.

The operator and the rationale behind it are discussed in detail in PEP 465.

  • 12
    That explains why it's in the latest version of tokenizer.py but not the 3.4 docs. – Octavia Togami Dec 9 '14 at 18:07
  • 10
    This is covered in 3.5's docs - docs.python.org/3.5/reference/… and docs.python.org/3.5/reference/… – jonrsharpe Dec 9 '14 at 18:09
  • Does this have conflict with Python decorators? This is not implemented in Python 2.n, right? – frankliuao Nov 2 '17 at 2:35
  • 3
    This does not conflict decorators, because decorators may never be preceded by an expression, and binary operators must always be preceded by an expression. – rightfold Nov 4 '17 at 11:15

@= and @ are new operators introduced in Python 3.5 performing matrix multiplication. They are meant to clarify the confusion which existed so far with the operator * which was used either for element-wise multiplication or matrix multiplication depending on the convention employed in that particular library/code. As a result, in the future, the operator * is meant to be used for element-wise multiplication only.

As explained in PEP0465, two operators were introduced:

  • A new binary operator A @ B, used similarly as A * B
  • An in-place version A @= B, used similarly as A *= B

Matrix Multiplication vs Element-wise Multiplication

To quickly highlight the difference, for two matrices:

A = [[1, 2],    B = [[11, 12],
     [3, 4]]         [13, 14]]
  • Element-wise multiplication will yield:

    A * B = [[1 * 11,   2 * 12], 
             [3 * 13,   4 * 14]]
    
  • Matrix multiplication will yield:

    A @ B  =  [[1 * 11 + 2 * 13,   1 * 12 + 2 * 14],
               [3 * 11 + 4 * 13,   3 * 12 + 4 * 14]]
    

Usage in Numpy

So far, Numpy used the following convention:

Introduction of the @ operator makes the code involving matrix multiplications much easier to read. PEP0465 gives us an example:

# Current implementation of matrix multiplications using dot function
S = np.dot((np.dot(H, beta) - r).T,
            np.dot(inv(np.dot(np.dot(H, V), H.T)), np.dot(H, beta) - r))

# Current implementation of matrix multiplications using dot method
S = (H.dot(beta) - r).T.dot(inv(H.dot(V).dot(H.T))).dot(H.dot(beta) - r)

# Using the @ operator instead
S = (H @ beta - r).T @ inv(H @ V @ H.T) @ (H @ beta - r)

Clearly, the last implementation is much easier to read and interpret as an equation.

  • 7
    Just for clarification: from your first example, we could think that @ has been implemented for list, which is not the case. – Conchylicultor Jan 14 '17 at 20:16
  • 1
    @ is associated with np.matmul, not np.dot. The two are similar but not the same. – A-B-B Sep 17 '17 at 1:26

@ is the new operator for Matrix Multiplication added in Python3.5

Reference: https://docs.python.org/3/whatsnew/3.5.html#whatsnew-pep-465

Example

C = A @ B

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