127

I am looking for a way to get all of the letters in a string before a : but I have no idea on where to start. Would I use regex? If so how?

string = "Username: How are you today?"

Can someone show me a example on what I could do?

218

Just use the split function. It returns a list, so you can keep the first element:

>>> s1.split(':')
['Username', ' How are you today?']
>>> s1.split(':')[0]
'Username'
3
  • 18
    Either limit the split, or in this case - use s1.partition(':')[0] – Jon Clements Dec 9 '14 at 19:44
  • Thank you this was very useful and informative. Plus it wa s a big help thanks! – 0Cool Dec 9 '14 at 21:27
  • 4
    Don't use split, since it's processing all the ':' and creates a full array, not good for longer strings. See @Hackaholic's approach to use an index. Just that one is also recommending a regex which is clearly not as effective. Also there has to be a python option to do the standard operation of .substringBefore() which is index based. And also variations like .substringBeforeLast(), etc should be there for convenience(code should not be repeated). Noticed the point about partition - yes, less processing after the ':', but still returns <class 'tuple'>: ('1', ':', '2:3') rather than '1'. – arntg Jan 9 '20 at 22:22
61

Using index:

>>> string = "Username: How are you today?"
>>> string[:string.index(":")]
'Username'

The index will give you the position of : in string, then you can slice it.

If you want to use regex:

>>> import re
>>> re.match("(.*?):",string).group()
'Username'                       

match matches from the start of the string.

you can also use itertools.takewhile

>>> import itertools
>>> "".join(itertools.takewhile(lambda x: x!=":", string))
'Username'
5
  • 4
    This method ( string[:string.index(":")]) is probably cleaner than the split – Damien May 24 '17 at 5:35
  • For speed don't use regex - use the first index option mentioned here. Regex is clearly not as effective. Also there has to be a python option to do the standard operation of .substringBefore() which is index based. And also variations like .substringBeforeLast(), etc should be there for convenience(code should not be repeated). Suggest to update this answer to explain why the index works better and then why this should used over other approaches including over the one voted higher now in fredtantini's response. – arntg Jan 9 '20 at 22:28
  • 1
    If it's not present, index will fail. – Marc Jul 30 '20 at 23:11
  • Here in regex: re.match("(.*?):",string).group() why do we need a '?' shouldn't this do re.match("(.*):",string).group() – David Gladson Jan 1 at 19:34
  • Shouldn't it be re.match("(.*?):",string).group(1) (probably needs some check if there is no colon)? re.match("(.*?):",string).group() seems to still include the colon. – user1587520 Jan 25 at 12:32
22

You don't need regex for this

>>> s = "Username: How are you today?"

You can use the split method to split the string on the ':' character

>>> s.split(':')
['Username', ' How are you today?']

And slice out element [0] to get the first part of the string

>>> s.split(':')[0]
'Username'
11

I have benchmarked these various technics under Python 3.7.0 (IPython).

TLDR

  • fastest (when the split symbol c is known): pre-compiled regex.
  • fastest (otherwise): s.partition(c)[0].
  • safe (i.e., when c may not be in s): partition, split.
  • unsafe: index, regex.

Code

import string, random, re

SYMBOLS = string.ascii_uppercase + string.digits
SIZE = 100

def create_test_set(string_length):
    for _ in range(SIZE):
        random_string = ''.join(random.choices(SYMBOLS, k=string_length))
        yield (random.choice(random_string), random_string)

for string_length in (2**4, 2**8, 2**16, 2**32):
    print("\nString length:", string_length)
    print("  regex (compiled):", end=" ")
    test_set_for_regex = ((re.compile("(.*?)" + c).match, s) for (c, s) in test_set)
    %timeit [re_match(s).group() for (re_match, s) in test_set_for_regex]
    test_set = list(create_test_set(16))
    print("  partition:       ", end=" ")
    %timeit [s.partition(c)[0] for (c, s) in test_set]
    print("  index:           ", end=" ")
    %timeit [s[:s.index(c)] for (c, s) in test_set]
    print("  split (limited): ", end=" ")
    %timeit [s.split(c, 1)[0] for (c, s) in test_set]
    print("  split:           ", end=" ")
    %timeit [s.split(c)[0] for (c, s) in test_set]
    print("  regex:           ", end=" ")
    %timeit [re.match("(.*?)" + c, s).group() for (c, s) in test_set]

Results

String length: 16
  regex (compiled): 156 ns ± 4.41 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)
  partition:        19.3 µs ± 430 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
  index:            26.1 µs ± 341 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split (limited):  26.8 µs ± 1.26 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split:            26.3 µs ± 835 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  regex:            128 µs ± 4.02 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

String length: 256
  regex (compiled): 167 ns ± 2.7 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)
  partition:        20.9 µs ± 694 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  index:            28.6 µs ± 2.73 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split (limited):  27.4 µs ± 979 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split:            31.5 µs ± 4.86 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  regex:            148 µs ± 7.05 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

String length: 65536
  regex (compiled): 173 ns ± 3.95 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)
  partition:        20.9 µs ± 613 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
  index:            27.7 µs ± 515 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split (limited):  27.2 µs ± 796 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split:            26.5 µs ± 377 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  regex:            128 µs ± 1.5 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)

String length: 4294967296
  regex (compiled): 165 ns ± 1.2 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000000 loops each)
  partition:        19.9 µs ± 144 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 100000 loops each)
  index:            27.7 µs ± 571 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split (limited):  26.1 µs ± 472 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  split:            28.1 µs ± 1.69 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
  regex:            137 µs ± 6.53 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10000 loops each)
3
  • 1
    why do you consider index unsafe? – James Dec 22 '18 at 0:49
  • 3
    s.index(c) raises a ValueError when c is not in s. So, I consider it as safe when I am sure that the string to be partitioned contains the separator, unsafe otherwise. – Aristide Dec 22 '18 at 7:17
  • 1
    For index, c is in s, so it is not unsafe and still fastest. – arntg Jan 9 '20 at 22:24
4

partition() may be better then split() for this purpose as it has the better predicable results for situations you have no delimiter or more delimiters.

1
  • 1
    Both partition and split will work transparently with an empty string or no delimiters. It is worth noting that word[:word.index(':')] will pop in both of these cases. – Rob Hall Jun 21 '20 at 13:02

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