2

I'm trying to extract some constants from a Perl file which I've defined in file A.pm

package A;

use constant ERROR_ID_MAP => [
    PLAYBACK_ERROR => {
         defaultMessage => "Sorry there was an error with a playback",
         errorCode => 0,
    },
    PURCHASE_ERROR => {
         defaultMessage => "Sorry, we've encountered a problem with purchasing. Please try again.",
         errorCode => 2123,
    },
];

and so on...

then in package B, I want to get that error file somehow. My thought was to get it like:

sub getErrorMap {
   my ($self) = @_;
   my $map = A::ERROR_ID_MAP;

   # Iterate through the array / hash and get the error's default message etc.
}

But this doesn't seem to work. The other option is to make package A into a class and perhaps return the constant? (In package A):

sub new {
    my ($class, $args) = @_;

    my $self;

    bless($self, $class);
    return $self;
}

sub getErrorConstants {
   my $self = @_;
   return ERROR_ID_MAP;
}

Is there an easier way to do this perhaps to just get all the data inside ERROR_ID_MAP without going through this trouble, so we almost treat package A as a configuration file of sorts?

NOTE - hopefully there's not too many errors in the code above that will take away from the point of the question.

  • 2
    A and B are poorly chosen names to use in examples because there is a module called B which is part of the Perl core. Foo and Bar, or perhaps AAAA and BBBB are better example names. – tobyink Dec 9 '14 at 21:56
  • 1
    @tobyink: They're poor choices of package names for reasons other than that they already exist in published libraries: they are completely meaningless! At least in the case of the B module it stands for Backend. – Borodin Dec 9 '14 at 22:05
  • Thank you for the help both. I appreciate it. – snakespan Dec 9 '14 at 22:14
2

You should write a module, say Definitions.pm, that uses Exporter, like this

Definitions.pm

package Definitions;

use strict;
use warnings;
use base 'Exporter';

our @EXPORT_OK = qw/ ERROR_ID_MAP /;

use constant ERROR_ID_MAP => [
    PLAYBACK_ERROR => {
         defaultMessage => "Sorry there was an error with a playback",
         errorCode => 0,
    },
    PURCHASE_ERROR => {
         defaultMessage => "Sorry, we've encountered a problem with purchasing. Please try again.",
         errorCode => 2123,
    },
];

Then you can just use Definitions and specify the constants that you want to import in your main code, like this

main.pl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Definitions qw/ ERROR_ID_MAP /;

use Data::Dump;

dd ERROR_ID_MAP;

output

[
  "PLAYBACK_ERROR",
  {
    defaultMessage => "Sorry there was an error with a playback",
    errorCode => 0,
  },
  "PURCHASE_ERROR",
  {
    defaultMessage => "Sorry, we've encountered a problem with purchasing. Please try again.",
    errorCode => 2123,
  },
]
6

While @Borodin's answer may look like it is doing what you want, be aware that there is nuance to constant.pm as the following example demonstrates:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use YAML::XS;

use constant X => [ { test => 1 }];

print Dump X;

X->[0]{test} = 3;

print Dump X;

Output

$ ./zxc.pl
---
- test: 1
---
- test: 3

use constant X => [ ... ] means the constant subroutine always returns the same reference. However, you can manipulate the elements to which that reference points. If you truly want to export constants, consider using Const::Fast:

Definitions.pm

package Definitions;

use strict;
use warnings;
use Const::Fast;
use Exporter qw( import );

our @EXPORT = qw();
our @EXPORT_OK = qw( $ERROR_ID_MAP );

const our $ERROR_ID_MAP => [
    PLAYBACK_ERROR => {
        defaultMessage => "Sorry there was an error with a playback",
        errorCode => 0,
    },
    PURCHASE_ERROR => {
        defaultMessage => "Sorry, we've encountered a problem with purchasing. Please try again.",
        errorCode => 2123,
    },
];

main.pl

!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use YAML::XS;
use Definitions qw( $ERROR_ID_MAP );

print Dump $ERROR_ID_MAP;

$ERROR_ID_MAP->[1]{errorCode} = 3;

Output:

---
- PLAYBACK_ERROR
- defaultMessage: Sorry there was an error with a playback
  errorCode: 0
- PURCHASE_ERROR
- defaultMessage: Sorry, we've encountered a problem with purchasing. Please try again.
  errorCode: 2123
Modification of a read-only value attempted at ./main.pl line 11.

Notice how an attempt to change an element of the data structure to which $ERROR_ID_MAP refers causes a helpful exception.

0

For this to work, you need to put

use A;

in B.pm

  • Hi Sputnik. You're correct, though I feel you're missing the overall question which is "Is there a more friendly way to do what I've demonstrated that I don't know about?" – snakespan Dec 9 '14 at 21:24
  • 2
    Once the module A has been loaded, either A::ERROR_ID_MAP or A->ERROR_ID_MAP will work. You can even do my $class = "A"; $class->ERROR_ID_MAP. Of these three choices the first is usually preferred because it can be optimized by the Perl compiler. – tobyink Dec 9 '14 at 21:58

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