7

I am using Visual Studio 2013 for development, which uses v12 of Microsoft's c++ compiler tools.
The following code executes fine, printing "foo" to the console:

#include <regex>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

std::string get() {
    return std::string("foo bar");
}

int main() {
    std::smatch matches;
    std::string s = get();
    std::regex_match(s, matches, std::regex("^(foo).*"));
    std::cout << matches[1] << std::endl;
}
// Works as expected.

The same code, with the string "s" substituted for the "get()" function, throws a "string iterators incompatible" error at runtime:

#include <regex>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

std::string get() {
    return std::string("foo bar");
}

int main() {
    std::smatch matches;
    std::regex_match(get(), matches, std::regex("^(foo).*"));
    std::cout << matches[1] << std::endl;
}
// Debug Assertion Failed!
// Expression: string iterators incompatible

This makes no sense to me. Can anyone explain why this happens?

2
  • Works for me, but there are indeed two overloads for lvalue and rvalue strings... perhaps one of them is bugged one your implementation?
    – Columbo
    Dec 9, 2014 at 23:50
  • 1
    Are you using gcc? Or a different regex implementation? I tested this with the Visual Studio 2015 preview, which uses v14 of the compiler tools, and the same error occurs.
    – slb
    Dec 9, 2014 at 23:53

1 Answer 1

10

The reason is that get() returns a temporary string, so the match results contains iterators into an object that no longer exists, and trying to use them is undefined behaviour. The debugging assertions in the Visual Studio C++ library notice this problem and abort your program.

Originally C++11 did allow what you're trying to do, but because it is so dangerous it was prevented by adding a deleted overload of std::regex_match which gets used when trying to get match results from a temporary string, see LWG DR 2329. That means your program should not compile in C++14 (or in compilers that implement the DR in C++11 mode too). GCC does not yet implement the change yet, I'll fix that.

2
  • 1
    Ah, that makes sense! Removing the cout line allows the code to run fine. I had forgotten that std::smatch only stores references to the results, not the results themselves.
    – slb
    Dec 10, 2014 at 0:03
  • 2
    Lavavej even mentioned it in his cppcon talk at youtu.be/dTeKf5Oek2c?t=41m50s . I found the talk pretty good to watch. Dec 10, 2014 at 0:10

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