4

I want to traverse through the values of a vector in opposite direction. As you know the size of a vector is of size_t. When I use the following code:

for(size_t r=m.size()-1; r >= 0; r--)
{
    x[r] = f[r];
    for(size_t c = r+1; c < m.size(); c++)
    {
        x[r] -= m[r][c] * x[c];
    }
}

I will go out of the range of the vector because the r will become 4294967295 after decrementing r = 0.

I am not changing the r's type because in my project, I am treating warnings as errors, so it should be size_t or I should cast it which is not interesting.

  • 3
    r >= 0 && r < m.size() – crashmstr Dec 10 '14 at 13:30
  • 10
    What about using reverse iterators ? – Shmil The Cat Dec 10 '14 at 13:30
  • I agree with the cat, looks like you could use rbegin()/rend(). – Borgleader Dec 10 '14 at 13:31
  • 1
    @ShmilTheCat except that he is indexing into x, r, and m. – crashmstr Dec 10 '14 at 13:31
  • yeah! the reverse iterators are interesting but in my whole code, I was using this type of itereators and it is not interesting to use it only once here. – mmostajab Dec 10 '14 at 13:32
6

If you actually want to use size_t for indexing, the loop could be formulated as follows.

for(size_t r = m.size(); r > 0; r--)
{
    x[r-1] = f[r-1];
    for(size_t c = r; c < m.size(); c++)
    {
        x[r-1] -= m[r-1][c] * x[c];
    }
}

Basically you would iterate from m.size() to 1 and compensate by shifting inside the loop; but this solution might be a bit hard to follow. In this question, a proposed solution is to use a reverse_iterator, which can be seen as a suitable abstraction of the index. The entire topic is coverd in more depth in this question.

  • 5
    DRY: auto r1 = r - 1; and use r1 in the loop (or switch the names r and r1 to make the loop body even more readable). – Angew Dec 10 '14 at 13:34
  • 2
    @Angew A really good example of when auto is obfuscation. – James Kanze Dec 10 '14 at 13:37
  • 4
    @JamesKanze Funny; it's obfuscating to you, it expresses intent to me. But I believe we've had this discussion already. – Angew Dec 10 '14 at 13:53
  • 1
    I strongly believe the 'correct' way would be to reformulate the implementation in such a way that index calculations are unnecessary in the first place. – Codor Dec 10 '14 at 13:54
  • 1
    @Griwes Hiding the type from the reader, especially when it makes so much difference, is obfuscation. It's also very fragile, since a change elsewhere in the code could cause a significant change in the semantics here. Using auto for an integral type is always a problem, since it is critical to know whether the type is signed or unsigned; the semantics change radically. – James Kanze Dec 10 '14 at 14:08
3

This is my favorite way:

std::size_t r = m.size();
while (r --> 0)
{
    // access m[r]
}
  • 1
  • I realize this is nice and pretty, but I would HIGHLY suggest against using --> the post-decrement then compare in the same expression obfuscates what's going on here – Mgetz Dec 10 '14 at 13:57
  • @Mgetz once one learns about how post-decrement works, it should be obvious what is going on here. I wish to consider not understanding this case to be just lack of knowledge of the language. – lisyarus Dec 10 '14 at 14:02
  • 1
    Having post-decrement and comparison in the same statement isn't that sinful, but breaking it up to look like --> will confuse inexperienced readers. – The Forest And The Trees Dec 10 '14 at 14:09
  • 1
    Modifying state in a conditional should generally be avoided, since it results in side effects where the reader doesn't expect them. What's wrong with putting the -- in a separate statement at the top of the loop, where it cannot be overlooked. – James Kanze Dec 10 '14 at 14:25
1

Well, you should avoid size_t as much as possible, since it is an unsigned type, and unsigned types aren't well behaved in C++, at least when it comes to arithmetic. But regardless of the type, the usual idiom I'd use for iterating in reverse (assuming for some reason I can't just use reverse iterators, which would be the natural solution) would be something like:

int r = m.size();     //  but size_t r would work here too.
while ( r > 0 ) {
    -- r;
    //  ...
}

Moving the decrementation to the top of the loop solves most of the problems, and is IMHO much clearer.

  • the problem is that the m.size() is of size_t and it will make a warning. – mmostajab Dec 10 '14 at 13:37
  • So cast it. That's what I'd do. It's the clearest way. As long as your vector isn't utterly vast, that is ;p – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 10 '14 at 13:45
  • 1
    @mmostajab I know. This is a design defect in the standard (due to constraints on some hardware at the time the library was being designed). If you're sure that m can never be larger than INT_MAX (and there are a lot of contexts where this can be guaranteed), then just cast. Otherwise, use a larger signed integral type. (In the code I present, size_t will actually work. But it could end up causing problems later.) – James Kanze Dec 10 '14 at 13:46
  • 1
    @Griwes Having something defined to do the wrong thing is worse than undefined behavior. In either case, you can't count on the behavior being what you want. Unsigned types in C++ are broken for use as an arithmetic type, for several reasons. Depending on the context, you might want to use std::ptrdiff_t, but in a lot of cases, you can know that int won't overflow, and safely use it. – James Kanze Dec 10 '14 at 14:22
  • 1
    @Griwes You can reason that neither do what you want in the case of overflow. That's about all. In general, the semantics of unsigned integral types in C++ are not appropriate for arithmetic values. They don't work; trying to use them for arithmetic values is an anti-pattern, which should be avoided. – James Kanze Dec 10 '14 at 15:04
0

Unsigned arithmetic is well-defined in C++, so I would just compare against the "overflow":

for (size_t r = m.size() - 1; r != -1; r--)

In the loop condition, the -1 is automatically converted to an unsigned with the correct value.

  • 2
    Relying on overflow is incredibly confusing. – rightfold Dec 10 '14 at 14:23
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit: the code is well-defined, thanks to how awesome unsigned integers are. – Griwes Dec 10 '14 at 15:31
  • @Griwse: I concur. – Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 10 '14 at 15:58
0

Using Boost.Range:

for (auto r : boost::irange(std::size_t(0), m.size()) | boost::adaptors::reversed) {
    x[r] = f[r];
    for (auto c : boost::irange(r + 1, m.size())) {
        x[r] -= m[r][c] * x[c];
    }
}
0

For anyone who is still searching for a method use the difference type from the containers, only a slight modification is needed in the code, instead of using size_t r = m.size()-1 use the following

std::vector<T>::difference_type r = m.end()-m.begin()

or you can use

std::ptrdiff_t r = m.end()-m.begin() and the loop will work ptrdiff_t is just an alias that marks the distance between 2 iterators.

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