1

Suppose you have to classes A & B whose objects have unrelated lifetimes:

class A
{ 
  public:
    IStateChanger& GetStateChanger() { return mStateChanger; }

  private:
    StateChanger mStateChanger;
};

class B
{
  public:
    void Register(IStateChanger& iStateChanger)
    {
      mpStateChanger = &iStateChanger;
    }

    void Notify()
    {
      mpStateChanger->DoSomething();
    }   

  private:     
    IStateChanger* mpStateChanger;
};

At one point, I register a StateChanger, which I get from an A object, at an object of B. Now A dies, destroying its own StateChanger. But B lives and calls a method on the StateChanger, because it thinks it's still alive. My goal is to make the Notify() method as robust as possible.

Of course, we could write some automatic Register/Unregister with observers. This seems a lot of overhead to me.

Or pass a weak_ptr, which implies creating the StateChanger as a shared_ptr at the IA object. And, I need to have an extra method for returning the weak_ptr at IA instead of the reference, which is ugly when someone is using A directly.

Or, I could write a comment on how to use the API correctly and that it's evil to kill IA without unregistering the StateChanger at B. This will definitely lead to a crash.

From what I read, observer_ptr could be a choice - but its not standardized yet.

So here's my question: Am I thinking in the wrong direction? Is there a much simpler design?

  • 1
    Take a look at sigslot. It consists of only 1 file (.h). It supports registering and (automatically) unregistering callbacks. It's also being used in Google's Native WebRTC API so I'm sure it's stable. – Tom Knapen Dec 10 '14 at 23:16

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