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I have a question regarding a potential security issue/limitation regarding JavaScript hosted on a domain (ex: domain of a CDN, say example.com), but loaded from a website under a different domain (say, example.net).

Now imagine that the JavaScript loaded will just read/modify text in a div with a particular id, so nothing "complicated". An example: I have the script loaded from http://example.com/myscript.js, and executed on http://example.net/index.html: [note the different TLD!]

<!-- Page example.net/index.html -->
<script src="http://example.com/myscript.js"></script>

I know that I can't access Cookies under mysite.com from the JavaScript, but I can access all the DOM on the page and in case, modify it. Isn't this a possible security issue? Shouldn't this trigger the same-origin-policy protection?

Are there user agents that prevents a JavaScript hosted on a different domain to access elements in the page that executes the script?

And, moreover, will the example above work also on HTTPS pages? (ex: https://example.net/index.html loads the script from https://example.com/myscript.js)

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All URL based security restrictions in client side JavaScript are based on the URL of the webpage containing the <script> element which loads the JS.

The URL the JS itself is hosted at is irrelevant.


Now, I know that I can't access Cookies under mysite.com from the JS.

The script is loaded into example.net and hosted on example.com. It can read cookies from example.net. It cannot read cookies from example.com. (Server side code on example.com could dynamically generate the JavaScript and embed data taken out of cookies though).


But, I can access all the DOM on the page, and, in case, modify it.

Yes

Isn't this a possible security issue? Shouldn't this trigger the same-origin-policy protection?

It is a potential security issue, but it should not trigger the Same Origin Policy.

By loading the script, the author of the page is trusting the site hosting the script.

Do not embed JS from sites you do not trust.


And, moreover, will the example above work also on HTTPS pages? (ex: https://example.net/index.html loads the script from https://example.com/myscript.js)

URLs with different schemes have different origins, just as URLs with different hostnames. The Same Origin Policy rules are the same as they are based on origin not particular features of origins.

Sometimes you will get additional restrictions where a page loaded over HTTPS will be forbidden from accessing content loaded over HTTP since that breaks the SSL security. This is a different security restriction that is unrelated to the Same Origin Policy.

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  • Yes, and that is exactly why CDNs are used to load js files. Dec 10 '14 at 14:49
  • Thank you for the detailed answer. Regarding cookies, if I want to set a "global" cookie from example.com (cookie sent via Set-Cookie header in response that contains the JS script), that can be read from all sites that load the script from example.com (the CDN), I should assume that this is impossibile, right? Dec 10 '14 at 15:07
  • Correct. See the note in the answer about using server side code.
    – Quentin
    Dec 10 '14 at 15:07
  • But, if I set the Domain of the cookie based on the Http-Referer header (parsing it and extracting only the hostname), I can set cookies that are related only to that particular domain that loads the javascript. Is this a proper way to handle cookies set by an external request, or the Http-Referer shouldn't be used for this situations? Dec 10 '14 at 15:26
  • 1
    @CarmineGiangregorio — You can't do that. The rules for cookies don't let you set foreign domains.
    – Quentin
    Feb 15 '16 at 9:52
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Isn't this a possible security issue?

Yes, this is called Cross-Site-Scripting (XSS).

It is most definitely a security issue.

Bottom line, never include code, from any domain, that you don't trust. End of story.

If an attacker can get code running on your domain, it's game-over.

Shouldn't this trigger the same-origin-policy protection?

No.

The same-origin-policy basically means that the script can only ever view/modify the DOM of the domain to which it was loaded. So you can't create an iframe to an arbitrary site and read that DOM from the parent unless CORS is on, or your script is running there too.

Perhaps, are there user agents that prevents a Javascript, hosted on a different domain, to access elements in the page that executes the script?

The only way to do this, is to sandbox that javascript inside of an iframe which is on a different domain.

So you could create a sandbox.example.com domain, which generates a wrapper page which includes the javascript.

Then, instead of linking to the JS directly, create an iframe to the sandbox domain. The JS will have access to that domain, and everything in that DOM, but nothing outside of the iframe.

You still have to be careful to set cookies properly (don't do wildcard domains, etc). But it can help.

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