58

This is valid code:

struct S {
  constexpr S(int x, int y): xVal(x), yVal(y) {}
  constexpr S(int x): xVal(x) {}
  constexpr S() {}

  const int xVal { 0 };
  const int yVal { 0 };
};

But here I'd really like to declare xVal and yVal constexpr--like this:

struct S {
  constexpr S(int x, int y): xVal(x), yVal(y) {}
  constexpr S(int x): xVal(x) {}
  constexpr S() {}

  constexpr int xVal { 0 };         // error!
  constexpr int yVal { 0 };         // error!
};

As indicated, the code won't compile. The reason is that (per 7.1.5/1), only static data members may be declared constexpr. But why?

7
  • 23
    Because they are member variables that are initialized at runtime and cannot be evaluated until they are initialized. Dec 10, 2014 at 19:08
  • @remyabel I believe why I can't have a constexpr is different than why I am I getting constexpr errors when I don't use brace initializes...
    – IdeaHat
    Dec 10, 2014 at 19:16
  • @IdeaHat Have you read the answer?
    – user3920237
    Dec 10, 2014 at 19:18
  • 1
    @remyabel: This question is completely different. It has nothing to do with initializing a static data member. Is there a way to get the misleading link at the top of my question to go away? Dec 10, 2014 at 20:24
  • 1
    @KnowItAllWannabe I flagged it as not constructive, the comment vacuum will come and blow all the comments away eventually.
    – IdeaHat
    Dec 10, 2014 at 20:28

1 Answer 1

61

Think about what constexpr means. It means that I can resolve this value at compile time.

Thus, a member variable of a class cannot itself be a constexpr...the instance that xVal belongs to does not exist until instantiation time! The thing that owns xVal could be constexpr, and that would make xVal a constexpr, but xVal could never be constexpr on its own.

That does not mean that these values can't be const expression...in fact, a constexpr instance of the class can use the variables as const expressions:

struct S {
  constexpr S(int x, int y): xVal(x), yVal(y) {}
  constexpr S(int x): xVal(x) {}
  constexpr S() {}

  int xVal { 0 };
  int yVal { 0 };
};

constexpr S s;

template <int f>//requires a constexpr
int foo() {return f;}

int main()
{
   cout << "Hello World" << foo<s.xVal>( )<< endl; 
   
   return 0;
}

Edit: So there has been alot of discussion below that reviewed that there was a couple of implied questions here.

"why can't I enforce all instances of a class to be constexpr by declaring its members to be constexpr?"

Take the following example:

//a.h
struct S;
struct A {std::unique_ptr<S> x; void Foo(); A();/*assume A() tries to instantiate an x*/}

//main.cpp

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  A a;
  a->foo();
}


//S.h
struct S {
  constexpr S(int x, int y): xVal(x), yVal(y) {}
  constexpr S(int x): xVal(x) {}
  constexpr S() {}

  constexpr int xVal { 0 };         // error!
  constexpr int yVal { 0 };
};

The definition of A and S could be in completely different compilation units, so the fact that S must be constexpr may not be known until link time, especially if the implementation of A is forgotten. Such ambiguous cases would be hard to debug and hard to implement. Whats worse is that the interface for S could be exposed entirely in a shared library, COM interface, ect...This could entirely change all the infrastructures for a shared library and that would probably be unacceptable.

Another reason would be how infectious that is. If any of the members of a class were constexpr, all the members (and all their members) and all instances would have to be constexpr. Take the following scenario:

//S.h
struct S {
  constexpr S(int x, int y): xVal(x), yVal(y) {}
  constexpr S(int x): xVal(x) {}
  constexpr S() {}

  constexpr int xVal { 0 };         // error!
  int yVal { 0 };
};

Any instance of S would have to be constexpr to be able to hold an exclusively constexpr xval. yVal inherently becomes constexpr because xVal is. There is no technical compiler reason you can't do that (i don't think) but it does not feel very C++-like.

"OK, but i REEAAALLLY want to make all instances of a class constexpr. What is the technical limitation that prevents me from doing that".

Probably nothing other than the standards committee didn't think it was a good idea. Personally, I find it having very little utility...I don't really want to define how people use my class, just define how my class behaves when they use it. When they use it, they can declare specific instances as constexpr (as above). If I have some block of code that I would like a constexpr instance over, I'd do it with a template:

template <S s>
function int bar(){return s.xVal;}

int main()
{
   cout << "Hello World" << foo<bar<s>()>( )<< endl; 
   
   return 0;
}

Though I think you'd be better off with a constexpr function that could be used both in the restrictive an non restrictive ways?

constexpr int bar(S s) { return s.xVal; }
17
  • I'd expect that constexpr data members would yield a class where all instances could be declared constexpr. That is, attempts to create objects with non-constexpr values would be rejected during compilation. Dec 10, 2014 at 19:32
  • @KnowItAllWannabe constexpr isn't a restriction on how something can be used; rather it is a permission to use it in places where constexpr is only allowed to be used. A constexpr function given non-constexpr arguments will run at runtime and not compile time...this is a good thing, because I don't want to duplicate my code for each case (like I used to have to do). Any class that could be instantiated as constexpr can always have instances that are not constexpr (All I'd need to do is call new S). Does that make sense?
    – IdeaHat
    Dec 10, 2014 at 19:39
  • With mutable data members of objects declared as constexpr, it is even arguable that constexpr means value known at compile-time. constexpr on types is indeed a restriction; one could imagine constexpr data members requiring initialization with a constant expression. Maybe, the benefits are too small or the original intention of constexpr violated for non-static data members.
    – dyp
    Dec 10, 2014 at 20:10
  • 1
    @IdeaHat: But now you're arguing that non-static constexpr data members would be bad design, whereas your proposed answer seems to argue that the values of such data members wouldn't be determinable during compilation. (Your example demonstrates that their values can be, provided they're initialized with constexpr values.) My fundamental interest is in knowing if there is some technical constraint that would make non-static constexpr data members unimplementable. Dec 10, 2014 at 20:32
  • 1
    infectious pure constexpr exists and is called consteval
    – v.oddou
    Apr 1, 2019 at 8:14

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