4

I searched a lot for an answer & I can't imagine that such method is not existing!! I've an MKTileOverlayPath (x , y & z) and also was able to get lon/lat of the center of this rectangle. Now I need to get span of each rect, is that possible?

10

Yes, though it's not entirely obvious with only MapKit.

Tiles & overlay paths are defined in a grid system where the number of points on a side of the (square) map equals 2^z * 256 since the default screen tile size is 256px square. z0 is one 256px square tile, z1 is four tiles for a total world of 512px square, etc. Tile coordinates in this system are linear (all squares in a square map).

MKMapPoint is derived from z20 such that MKMapSizeWorld is 268,435,456 map points on a side. If you do the math, 2^20 * 256 = 268,435,456. Map points are also linear (pixels/points in a square map).

Latitude and longitude of course is not linear since this is a projected representation which is why you have functions like MKMetersPerMapPointAtLatitude().

If you have the following MKTileOverlayPath:

  • z = 10
  • x = 12
  • y = 8

You know that the world point size is 2^10 * 256 = 262,144 and that the world is 2^10 = 1,024 tiles on a side.

The tile's left edge is 256 * 12 = 3,072 points in and the top edge is 256 * 8 = 2,048 points down. These are in relation to z10, which is 268,435,456 / 262,144 = 1,024 times smaller scale than z20.

This is an MKMapPoint of { x: (3,072 * 1,024 = 3,145,728), y: (2,048 * 1,024 = 2,097,152) }.

The bottom right is similarly { x: 3,407,872, y: 2,359,296 } (add the tile's size of 256 * 1,024 = 262,144 to each).

You can use MKCoordinateForMapPoint() on each to get CLLocationCoordinate2D out, as well as subtract their differences to get the MKCoordinateSpan.

  • Top left: { latitude: 84.8024737243345, longitude: -175.78125 }
  • Bottom right: { latitude: 84.7705283207591, longitude: -175.4296875 }
  • Span: { latitudeDelta: 0.0319454035754205, longitudeDelta: 0.3515625 }

Yes, these points are very close to the top-left Alaska region of the map, but that's logical given that x = 12 and y = 8 out of 1,024 tiles numbered from the top left.

@interface GridTileOverlay : MKTileOverlay

@end

@implementation GridTileOverlay
-(void)loadTileAtPath:(MKTileOverlayPath)path result:(void (^)(NSData *, NSError *))result {
    NSLog(@"Loading tile x/y/z: %ld/%ld/%ld",(long)path.x,(long)path.y,(long)path.z);

    int worldPointSize = pow(2,(int)path.z)*256; // 2^10 * 256 = 262,144
    int tilesOnASide = pow(2,(int)path.z);       // 2^10 = 1,024
    long leftEdge = path.x *256;                 // 256 * 12 = 3,072 points
    long topEdge = path.y *256;                  // 256 * 8  = 2,048
    int w = self.boundingMapRect.size.width;     // 2^20 * 256 = 268,435,456
    int zScale =  w / worldPointSize;            // 268,435,456 / 262,144 = 1,024
    int tileSize = 256 * zScale;                 // 256 * 1,024 = 262,144
    long x0 = leftEdge*zScale;                   // 3,072 * 1,024 = 3,145,728
    long y0 = topEdge*zScale;                    // 2,048 * 1,024 = 3,145,728
    long x1 = x0 + tileSize;
    long y1 = y0 + tileSize;

    MKMapPoint ul = MKMapPointMake(x0, y0);      // upper left
    MKMapPoint lr = MKMapPointMake(x1, y1);      // lower right
    MKMapRect mapRect = MKMapRectMake (fmin(ul.x, lr.x),
                              fmin(ul.y, lr.y),
                              fabs(ul.x - lr.x),
                              fabs(ul.y - lr.y));
}
@end  
2

variations on a theme

  + (MKMapRect)mapRectForTilePath:(MKTileOverlayPath)path
{
    CGFloat xScale = (double)path.x / [self worldTileWidthForZoomLevel:path.z];
    CGFloat yScale = (double)path.y / [self worldTileWidthForZoomLevel:path.z];
    MKMapRect world = MKMapRectWorld;
    return MKMapRectMake(world.size.width * xScale,
                         world.size.height * yScale,
                         world.size.width / [self worldTileWidthForZoomLevel:path.z],
                         world.size.height / [self worldTileWidthForZoomLevel:path.z]);
}

/*
 Determine the number of tiles wide *or tall* the world is, at the given zoomLevel.
 (In the Spherical Mercator projection, the poles are cut off so that the resulting 2D map is "square".)
 */
+ (NSUInteger)worldTileWidthForZoomLevel:(NSUInteger)zoomLevel
{
    return (NSUInteger)(pow(2,zoomLevel));
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.