4

The #[cfg] helper is pretty obscure, and not particularly well documented, but by digging through librustc I've got a pretty reasonable list of all the available config targets(target_os, target_family, target_arch, target_endian, target_word_size, windows, unix), and of course you can use not(..) to specify combinations.

However, I can't figure out how to have a 'default' implementation.

Is there some way of doing this using cfg?

#[cfg(???)] <--- What goes here?
fn thing {
  panic!("Not implemented! Please file a bug at http://... to request support for your platform")
}

#[cfg(target_os = "mac_os"]
fn thing() {
  // mac impl 
}

#[cfg(target_os = "windows"]] 
fn thing() {
  // windows impl
}

I see the stdlib has some:

#[cfg(not(any(target_os = "macos", target_os = "ios", windows)]

Which involves a lot of tedious copy and paste. Is that the only way?

(Panics are bad right? Don't do that? This is for a build.rs script, where you should and must panic to raise the error up to cargo)

  • 1
    Why not use something like the cfg_if! macro? – quadrupleslap Jan 7 '18 at 9:24
3

Which involves a lot of tedious copy and paste. Is that the only way?

Judging by the documentation and RFCs on conditional compilation, yes, this is the only way. If there would be a way to specify:

#[cfg(other)]
fn thing {

that would increase the complexity in the parsing of cfg attribute because compiler would need to know that thing would be compiled only if mac_os or windows are not defined.

Also, what about this:

#[cfg(other)]
fn thing_some_other {
  panic!("Not implemented! Please file a bug at http://... to request support for your platform")
}

#[cfg(target_os = "mac_os"]
fn thing() {
  // mac impl 
}

#[cfg(target_os = "windows"]] 
fn thing() {
  // windows impl
}

In other words, they would need to be tied together, akin to C's:

#ifdef WINDOWS
    // ...
#elif LINUX
     // ...
#else
     // ...
#endif
2

There is no other way of doing it; cfg(not(any(…, …))) is the only way.

As far as your “anything else” case, for the specific build script case a runtime panic would be acceptable, though it would not be in any other (incidentally, for this runtime version there is unimplemented!() which can be handy for stubbing, allowing you to omit the message).

Still, I would tend to prefer an explicit compile-time failure, generally by omitting it, but possibly also (to make it simpler to indicate to the user what the problem is) you might include something that will be fine if the cfg conditions omit it but will cause a compilation failure if they do not, like this:

#[cfg(not(any(target_os = "windows", target_os = "mac")))]
fn thing() {
    sorry! (this function is unimplemented for this platform, please report a bug at X)
}

That compiles just fine on Windows and Mac but will not compile on Linux provided there is no sorry macro around (and provided that the contents tokenise, which forbids a very few things like backslashes outside strings and comments). There are other slightly more sure ways of doing it (e.g. sorry = "message" with no let) but I’ve been captured by this one’s cuteness.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.