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I have been wanting to figure this out for a long time, but have had no success yet. I am assuming I will use arrayfun, but I couldn't figure it yet. Appreciate help. Here is the problem:

Given a matrix of many rows and N^2 columns, reshape every row to NxN matrix and calculate eigenvalues, and do this in a vectorized way not using for loop. For example

A= 
0.6060168   0.8340029   0.0064574   0.7133187
0.6325375   0.0919912   0.5692567   0.7432627
0.8292699   0.5136958   0.4171895   0.2530783
0.7966113   0.1975865   0.6687064   0.3226548
0.0163615   0.2123476   0.9868179   0.1478827

for every **i**

m=reshape(A(i,:),2,2)

[vc vl]=eig(m)

I am inclined to do something like

f = @(x) eig(reshape(x,2,2))

arrayfun(f,A)

but of course I am getting an error like

octave:5> arrayfun(f,A)
error: reshape: can't reshape 1x1 array to 2x2 array
error: evaluating argument list element number 1
error: evaluating argument list element number 1
error: called from:
error:    at line -1, column -1
error: cellfun: too many output arguments
error:   /usr/share/octave/3.2.4/m/general/arrayfun.m at line 168, column 21
2
A = [0.6060168 0.8340029 0.0064574 0.7133187;
0.6325375 0.0919912 0.5692567 0.7432627;
0.8292699 0.5136958 0.4171895 0.2530783;
0.7966113 0.1975865 0.6687064 0.3226548;
0.0163615 0.2123476 0.9868179 0.1478827];

N = 2;
[mc, ml] = arrayfun (@(row) eig (reshape (A (row, :), N, N)), 1:rows(A), "UniformOutput", false)

mc = 
{
  [1,1] =

    -0.170783  -0.044626
     0.985309  -0.999004

  [1,2] =

    -0.95343  -0.89053
     0.30161  -0.45492

  (cropped)

}
ml = 
{
  [1,1] =

Diagonal Matrix

     0.56876         0
           0   0.75057

  [1,2] =

Diagonal Matrix

     0.45246         0
           0   0.92334
(cropped)
  • Thanks a lot. It is a terrific answer. You made my day! – Sinan_B Dec 11 '14 at 12:23
  • why terrific? I think there are also other possibilities. Is this homework? – Andy Dec 11 '14 at 12:25
  • No it is not homework ( I am well beyond my homework doing years!). It is relevant to a common calculation in solid state physics. I would be more than happy to see other possibilities if you or others have time to indicate it here. In the process, I realized that my Octave knowledge is still elementary (although my programming experience is not (F90,linux,bash) ). I am curious how much the vectorization will speed up my calculations. I will indicate it here once I do the benchmark. – Sinan_B Dec 11 '14 at 13:50
  • Now my code is 4 times faster than before. It seems now the calculation is scaling linearly with nrow as opposed to nrow^2. Thanks for your help. – Sinan_B Jan 1 '15 at 16:20
1

With the Ndpar package, calculations can be parallelized over multiple cores. Borrowing from Andy's answer,

pkg load ndpar

A = [0.6060168 0.8340029 0.0064574 0.7133187;
0.6325375 0.0919912 0.5692567 0.7432627;
0.8292699 0.5136958 0.4171895 0.2530783;
0.7966113 0.1975865 0.6687064 0.3226548;
0.0163615 0.2123476 0.9868179 0.1478827];

N = 2;
[eigenvectors, eigenvalues] = ndpar_arrayfun(nproc, 
                                @(row) eig(reshape(row, N, N)), 
                                A, "IdxDimensions", 1, "Uniformoutput", false)

yields the same output.


EDIT - Or with the original pararrayfun from the octave-forge parallel package:

[eigenvectors, eigenvalues] = pararrayfun(nproc, 
                                @(row_idx) eig(reshape(A(row_idx, :), N, N)), 
                                1:rows(A), "UniformOutput", false)
  • Haven't heard of this package before. Will definitely be useful. Thanks. – Sinan_B Dec 11 '14 at 21:12
  • @huntj Have you talked with Olaf to include these changes to octave-forge parallel? I think you should write an EMail to the Octave maintainers list and ask for a review. – Andy Dec 12 '14 at 8:15
  • @Andy Indeed, about a year ago, I filed a preliminary patch that was rejected by Olaf. Maybe later. – ederag Dec 13 '14 at 23:01
  • I tried running my code both with ndpar_arrayfun and pararrayfun on a double-core machine. However, it turned out that the code took 4 times longer than before. May be these can be useful for ncore >= 2. Thanks for the suggestion though. I am sure they will be useful in other cases. – Sinan_B Jan 1 '15 at 15:38
  • @TuxOnPogoStick The speedup is highly dependent on the the execution time of the function to be parallelized, relative to the overhead time. If the matrices really are 2x2, the function is too fast indeed. – ederag Jan 1 '15 at 21:54

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