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For a while now I've been using multiple SQL connections in php to avoid the "You cannot run this command now. Commands out of sync"-error.

It seems that I cannot figure out when I can do with only one connection and when I need multiple. The following code is how I retrieve things from different tables that are related to one another.

The $sqls are default mysqli objects connected to the same database. Example is a dummed-down version of the problem and serves no real purpose, in case you're wondering.

$stmt1 = $sql1->prepare ('SELECT orderid,date FROM orders');
$stmt2 = $sql2->prepare ('SELECT product,price FROM orderlines WHERE orderid= ?');

$stmt1->execute();
$stmt1->bind_result($orderid,$date);

while ($stmt1->fetch()) {

echo "Order ID: " . $orderid . " from date: " . $date . ":<br>";

$stmt2->bind_param("i",$orderid);
$stmt2->execute();
$stmt2->bind_result($product, $price);

 while ($stmt2->fetch() {
  echo "Product from order is: " . $product . " and costs " . $price . "<br>";
 }

echo "End of order " . $orderid;

}

$stmt1->close();
$stmt2->close();

$sql1->close();
$sql2->close();

This works, but only if I don't use the same mysqli object. If I try to do both with only one common $sql object, the results from the second stmt remain empty.

So the question is: Is this supposed to happen, and is the above approach a good or bad practice?

I have no issues with this - everything works really well, but the way this is done seems odd to me, and I can't find anything about this particular issue.

EDIT: Updated question to example with orders and orderlines to display where this would occur.

EDIT 2: I Found two mysqli querys, one in a while loop - but that posts my question as a solution.

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  • 2
    Correct approach: use JOIN of tables orders and orderlines – Alma Do Dec 11 '14 at 12:34
  • Well, joining the table doesn't really change how this would pan out, it would only make the query run slower, as I still need a list of orders (first statement could have a WHERE clause), and then for each of these orders I need to fetch something entirely different. Correct me if I'm wrong with an example. – nickdnk Dec 11 '14 at 12:38
  • What do you mean by "fetch something entirely different"? As long as both tables can be connected in a join, you simply specify the fields that you want to have available to use, even if these are not key fields. – T9b Dec 11 '14 at 13:07
  • You're right, that was poorly worded. The problem is that if I use a single query, how can I output some HTML inbetween each order? Imagine if each order started a <table> and ended a </table> - how would I fill the data inbetween with a single query? – nickdnk Dec 11 '14 at 13:09
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In one MySQL connection, you can work with only one query at the time. You may prepare more statements at once (these data are still kept in MySQLi driver), however, once you use execute(), statement will be send to database and database will expect all future bind_param() and bind_result() requests to be of the same statement, until you send in new statement.

Two statements at the same time => two connections to the DB => two mysqli objects.


Plus your problem can be solved in single query like:

$stmt1 = $sql1->prepare ('SELECT o.orderid,o.date,b.product,b.price FROM orders o LEFT JOIN orderlines b ON b.orderid=o.orderid ORDER BY o.orderid');
$stmt1->execute();
$stmt1->bind_result($orderid,$date,$product,$price);
$prev_order_id=false;
while ($stmt1->fetch())
{
    if($prev_order_id!=$orderid)
    {
        if($prev_order_id!==false)
            echo "End of order " . $prev_orderid."<br>";
        echo "Order ID: " . $orderid . " from date: " . $date . ":<br>";
    }
    if(is_null($product))
        echo "Product from order is: " . $product . " and costs " . $price . "<br>";
    $prev_order_id=$orderid;
}
if($prev_order_id!==false)
    echo "End of order " . $prev_orderid."<br>";
$stmt1->close();
$sql1->close();
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  • This is good. Do you know if using multiple SQL connections is considered bad practice? – nickdnk Dec 12 '14 at 13:15
  • @nickdnk: Depends on your problem. If you need it, do it. Whether to solve 'a problem' using more connections with simple algorithm or use just one connection utilizing complex algorithm, is very situational. Best practice would be to test both variants and choose the best. – David162795 Dec 12 '14 at 16:26
  • Thanks. What I'm worried about is what happens when you use multiple SQL objects and how that influences on CPU and RAM usage for the server, not to mention how safe it is to rely on different connections. I haven't had any problems yet though, but my user base is not very large either, yet. With MySQLs max default connection config at 100 or 150 at default I didn't know if I was heading down a poor path. – nickdnk Dec 12 '14 at 18:36
  • @nickdnk: As you said it yourself, mysql alone in default config supports over 100 connections at one time. As for CPU and RAM, it is just another (small-ish) data object in memory, no big deal. The theoretically biggest stress comes from opening the connection, but still, no big deal in small numbers. The worst for your database would be badly designed tables and requests, in a way where one request could lock the table for several seconds, filling the queue with 'waiting for table lock' other queries, exhausting the connection limit that way. – David162795 Dec 13 '14 at 12:31
  • Okay. Thanks a lot. I realize query optimisation is the most important part. None of my queries run for over ~0.1 sseconds anyway, even those that use 4-5-6 SQL objects. This was just to clear up if what I was doing was considered really bad practice. – nickdnk Dec 13 '14 at 16:00

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