215

Writing a small command line tool, it would be nice to output in different colours. Is this possible?

10 Answers 10

281

Yes. See this article. Here's an example from there:

Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
Console.WriteLine("White on blue.");

enter image description here

4
  • 6
    is it possible to add background image? – RollRoll Jun 14 '16 at 14:43
  • @RollRoll not in the default cmd.exe. You can try using a Console emulator though, which supports background image tweaking, but still, it cannot be done programatiaclly anyway. – Remigiusz Schoida Mar 2 '19 at 18:23
  • 2
    +1 When you've been doing this stuff for over 10 years and just now learned what they knew 10 years ago....this never gets old, ha. – Jester May 29 '20 at 1:07
  • Thanks for the help! – mend0k Jul 8 at 19:40
132
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
        Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
        Console.WriteLine("White on blue.");
        Console.WriteLine("Another line.");
        Console.ResetColor();
    }
}

Taken from here.

0
61

Above comments are both solid responses, however note that they aren't thread safe. If you are writing to the console with multiple threads, changing colors will add a race condition that can create some strange looking output. It is simple to fix though:

public class ConsoleWriter
{
    private static object _MessageLock= new object();

    public void WriteMessage(string message)
    {
        lock (_MessageLock)
        {
            Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;
            Console.WriteLine(message);
            Console.ResetColor();
        }
    }
}
4
  • 14
    Writing from multiple threads without synchronisation will result in garbled output even if there are no color changes: it's not just changing colors that causes a race condition – Joe Jul 5 '17 at 9:41
  • 8
    @Joe A single Write call will not be garbled. See stackoverflow.com/questions/4812508/…. It's just the order of the write-calls which is not "safe". – BatteryBackupUnit Oct 17 '17 at 9:29
  • But what about if other processes are writing to the same console? They won't be using your lock object. Is there any truly atomic way to change the color, write to the console, and then change the color back? – Kyle Delaney Sep 1 '20 at 18:52
  • 1
    They won't be using the console writer if you don't choose to use the console writer. The implication here is that you use this object for all writes to the console. I suppose you could do some tricky wrapper on the Console.Write command, but that sees a bit overkill. – Roger Hill Sep 3 '20 at 17:41
39

I've created a small plugin (available on NuGet) that allows you to add any (if supported by your terminal) color to your console output, without the limitations of the classic solutions.

It works by extending the String object and the syntax is very simple:

"colorize me".Pastel("#1E90FF");

Both foreground and background colors are supported.

enter image description here

2
  • 1
    I believe this library uses those ANSI escape color codes, which appears to be what Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Console is also using. – Pang Oct 16 '20 at 3:01
  • 1
    @Pang Microsoft.Extensions.Logging.Console is a logging library, whereas Pastel can be used for printing directly to the console; also it seems to be supporting a limited subset of colors from what I can derive from the source code. – silkfire Oct 16 '20 at 8:38
15

Yes, it's easy and possible. Define first default colors.

Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Black;
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
Console.Clear();

Console.Clear() it's important in order to set new console colors. If you don't make this step you can see combined colors when ask for values with Console.ReadLine().

Then you can change the colors on each print:

Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Black;
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Red;
Console.WriteLine("Red text over black.");

When finish your program, remember reset console colors on finish:

Console.ResetColor();
Console.Clear();

Now with netcore we have another problem if you want to "preserve" the User experience because terminal have different colors on each Operative System.

I'm making a library that solves this problem with Text Format: colors, alignment and lot more. Feel free to use and contribute.

https://github.com/deinsoftware/colorify/ and also available as NuGet package

Colors for Windows/Linux (Dark):
enter image description here

Colors for MacOS (Light):
enter image description here

10

Here is a simple method I wrote for writing console messages with inline color changes. It only supports one color, but it fits my needs.

// usage: WriteColor("This is my [message] with inline [color] changes.", ConsoleColor.Yellow);
static void WriteColor(string message, ConsoleColor color)
{
    var pieces = Regex.Split(message, @"(\[[^\]]*\])");

    for(int i=0;i<pieces.Length;i++)
    {
        string piece = pieces[i];
        
        if (piece.StartsWith("[") && piece.EndsWith("]"))
        {
            Console.ForegroundColor = color;
            piece = piece.Substring(1,piece.Length-2);          
        }
        
        Console.Write(piece);
        Console.ResetColor();
    }
    
    Console.WriteLine();
}

image of a console message with inline color changes

0
6

Just to add to the answers above that all use Console.WriteLine: to change colour on the same line of text, write for example:

Console.Write("This test ");
Console.BackgroundColor = bTestSuccess ? ConsoleColor.DarkGreen : ConsoleColor.Red;
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;
Console.WriteLine((bTestSuccess ? "PASSED" : "FAILED"));
Console.ResetColor();
4

Yes, it is possible as follows. These colours can be used in a console application to view some errors in red, etc.

Console.BackgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Blue;
Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.White;//after this line every text will be white on blue background
Console.WriteLine("White on blue.");
Console.WriteLine("Another line.");
Console.ResetColor();//reset to the defoult colour
0

I did want to just adjust the text color when I want to use Console.WriteLine(); So I had to write

Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.DarkGreen;
Console.WriteLine("my message");
Console.ResetColor();

every time that I wanted to write something

So I invented my WriteLine() method and kept using it in Program class instead of Console.WriteLine()

public static void WriteLine(string buffer, ConsoleColor foreground = ConsoleColor.DarkGreen, ConsoleColor backgroundColor = ConsoleColor.Black)
{
   Console.ForegroundColor = foreground;
   Console.BackgroundColor = backgroundColor;
   Console.WriteLine(buffer);
   Console.ResetColor();
}

and to make it even easier I also wrote a Readline() method like this:

public static string ReadLine()
{
   var line = Console.ReadLine();
   return line ?? string.Empty;
}

so now here is what we have to do to write or read something in the console:

static void Main(string[] args) {
   WriteLine("hello this is a colored text");
   var answer = Readline();
}
0

A sample method to color multiple words at the same time.

private static void WriteColor(string str, params (string substring, ConsoleColor color)[] colors)
{
    var words = Regex.Split(str, @"( )");

    foreach (var word in words)
    {
        (string substring, ConsoleColor color) cl = colors.FirstOrDefault(x => x.substring.Equals("{" + word + "}"));
        if (cl.substring != null)
        {
            Console.ForegroundColor = cl.color;
            Console.Write(cl.substring.Substring(1, cl.substring.Length - 2));
            Console.ResetColor();
        }
        else
        {
            Console.Write(word);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

WriteColor("This is my message with new color with red", ("{message}", ConsoleColor.Red), ("{with}", ConsoleColor.Blue));

Output:

enter image description here

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