17

The Scala example for passing a function to another function lacks the case where the passed function (timeFlies) takes an argument (x).

object Timer {
  def oncePerSecond(callback: (Int) => Unit) {
    while (true) { callback(x); Thread sleep 1000 }
  }
  def timeFlies(x: int) {
    println("time flies like an arrow...")
  }
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    oncePerSecond(timeFlies(5))
  }
}

How can I make the above code work?

Edit: I added an x in the oncepersecond to clarify the goal is to pass the integer.

  • Do you really need to pass the Int to oncePerSecond? All the answers below should be fine and are better than passing that Int. Anyways, oncePerSecond(timeFlies, 5) and def oncePerSecond(callback: Int => Unit, x: Int) should work. – Dimitri Dec 11 '14 at 22:39
23

There are at least two ways you can do it, depending on where exactly you want to pass the argument in. The first way is where you keep main like you had it.

object Timer {
  def oncePerSecond(callback: => Unit) {
    while (true) { callback; Thread sleep 1000 }
  }
  def timeFlies(x: Int) {
    println("time flies like an arrow...")
  }
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    oncePerSecond(timeFlies(5))
  }
}

The other method is to pass the parameter in at the point of the callback, like this:

object Timer {
  def oncePerSecond(callback: (Int) => Unit) {
    val x = 5
    while (true) { callback(x); Thread sleep 1000 }
  }
  def timeFlies(x: Int) {
    println("time flies like an arrow...")
  }
  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    oncePerSecond(timeFlies)
  }
}

Note that timeFlies has the signature (Int) => Unit, but timeFlies(5) has the signature => Unit, because of partial application. This basically means you can apply the parameter to automatically create a function that takes fewer parameters. oncePerSecond needs to know in its signature if you've already applied the Int parameter to the callback or not.

Both methods are useful for different use cases. The first way lets oncePerSecond not have to know about the callback's parameters. The second way lets you change the value of x every time through the loop if you want.

  • Model answer. Thank you. – BAR Dec 12 '14 at 15:24
  • in the first way 'callback: => Unit' is there anyway to preserve the 'type' of the function I want to pass? callback: => Unit is so general, I would like to say exactly which type of function i'm expecting... – Jas Dec 17 '14 at 8:34
  • Nope. The whole point of using that method would be if you don't want to know the unapplied type. – Karl Bielefeldt Dec 17 '14 at 12:48
3

The return type of timeFlies will be Unit, not Function. Perhaps you meant:

oncePerSecond(() => timeFlies(5))
2

oncePerSecond(() => timeFlies(5))

or

def oncePerSecond(callback: => Unit) {...

0

The parameter callback: () => Unit is a zero-parameter function that returns Unit. You should make it call-by-name parameter (something that evaluates to Unit):

def oncePerSecond(callback: => Unit) = ...

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