How can we change y axis to percent like the figure? I can change y axis range but I can't make it to percent. enter image description here

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Use:

+ scale_y_continuous(labels = scales::percent)

Or, to specify formatting parameters for the percent:

+ scale_y_continuous(labels = scales::percent_format(accuracy = 1))

(the command labels = percent is obsolete since version 2.2.1 of ggplot2)

  • 2
    I liked that you don't have to type library(scales) for this. – Akshay Gaur Sep 14 at 2:50
  • How can we specify arguments to that percent function when used as labels input? For examples scales::percent() accepts accuracy as an input, which would be helpful to format the percent scales (eg less precision) – mkirzon Oct 14 at 23:45
  • @mkirzon as Deena's example below, pass an anonymous function, ie. labels = function(x) scales::percent(x,accuracy = 2) – JWilliman Oct 15 at 2:24

ggplot2 and scales packages can do that:

y <- c(12, 20)/100
x <- c(1, 2)

library(ggplot2)
library(scales)
myplot <- qplot(as.factor(x), y, geom="bar")
myplot + scale_y_continuous(labels=percent)

It seems like the stat() option has been taken off, causing the error message. Try this:

library(scales)

myplot <- ggplot(mtcars, aes(factor(cyl))) + 
          geom_bar(aes(y = (..count..)/sum(..count..))) + 
          scale_y_continuous(labels=percent)

myplot

In principle, you can pass any reformatting function to the labels parameter:

+ scale_y_continuous(labels = function(x) paste0(x*100, "%")) # Multiply by 100 & add %  

Or

+ scale_y_continuous(labels = function(x) paste0(x, "%")) # Add percent sign 

Reproducible example:

library(ggplot2)
df = data.frame(x=seq(0,1,0.1), y=seq(0,1,0.1))

ggplot(df, aes(x,y)) + 
  geom_point() +
  scale_y_continuous(labels = function(x) paste0(x*100, "%"))
  • 6
    +1 for no external dependency. I know that since Hadley is the author of both ggplot2 and scales, it shouldn't really matter—but this solution is still appreciated. – Mark White Mar 8 at 21:03

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