16

I'm having an application listening on port 8081 and Nginx running on port 8080. The proxy pass statement looks like:

$ cat /var/etc/opt/lj/output/services/abc.servicemanager.conf

location /api/abc.servicemanager/1.0 { proxy_pass     http://localhost:8081;}

In nginx.conf, I include this file as:

include /etc/nginx/conf.d/services/*.conf;

The /etc/nginx/conf.d/service is a symlink:

# ll /etc/nginx/conf.d/

lrwxrwxrwx. 1 root root   39 Dec 10 00:19 services -> ../../../var/etc/opt/lj/output/services

This is a CentOS 7.0 SELinux Enabled system. If I setenforce 0, and make it Permissive, I don't see any issues. So the file is in right place and no issues with paths. If SELinux is enforcing, I see the following in audit log:

type=AVC msg=audit(1418348761.372:100930): avc:  denied  { getattr } for  pid=3936 comm="nginx" path="/var/etc/opt/lj/output/services/abc.servicemanager.conf" dev="xvda1" ino=11063393 scontext=system_u:system_r:httpd_t:s0 tcontext=system_u:object_r:var_t:s0 tclass=file

I want to know how to enable Nginx to find the conf file without having to disable SELinux.

33

Worth noting for beginners in SELinux that if your proxied service is running on 8080, you can use the command below without compiling a policy.

$ sudo setsebool httpd_can_network_connect 1 -P
  • Is it really about the port? I think SELinux was denying him access to the config file: ... { getattr } .. path=".......".... Please correct me if I'm wrong. – Ayman Nedjmeddine Apr 18 '17 at 11:57
  • 1
    Yes, you're correct. The OP's issue was file-system access issue, not the network connection. I should have commented on Vijay Shankar's answer. – Cristian Romanescu Oct 16 '17 at 12:03
23

Read about audit2allow and used it to create a policy to allow access to the denied requests for Nginx.

Step 1 involves running audit2allow targeting nginxlocalconf:

$ sudo grep nginx /var/log/audit/audit.log | \
     grep denied | audit2allow -m nginxlocalconf > nginxlocalconf.te

Step 2, review results:

$ cat nginxlocalconf.te 

module nginxlocalconf 1.0;

require {
    type httpd_t;
    type var_t;
    type transproxy_port_t;
    class tcp_socket name_connect;
    class file { read getattr open };
}

#============= httpd_t ==============

#!!!! This avc can be allowed using the boolean 'httpd_can_network_connect'
allow httpd_t transproxy_port_t:tcp_socket name_connect;
allow httpd_t var_t:file { read getattr open };

Review steps to activate:

$ sudo grep nginx /var/log/audit/audit.log | grep denied | \
   audit2allow -M nginxlocalconf
******************** IMPORTANT ***********************
To make this policy package active, execute:

semodule -i nginxlocalconf.pp

Step 3, active:

$ sudo semodule -i nginxlocalconf.pp
  • i follow this step by step and it works. great. but i have no idea what I did. wondering where i can learn more about this. – Ppp Apr 3 at 10:56
3

Always prefer changing types to creating custom policies. In this case, Nginx will serve files with the httpd_sys_content_t type. Assuming your files are located in /var/www:

semanage fcontext -a -t httpd_sys_content_t /var/www/*
restorecon -R -v /var/www
2

If you have another port or custom port allow it:

Show allow port in http:

semanage port -l | grep http

This is output in my localhost:

http_cache_port_t              tcp      8080, 8118, 8123, 10001-10010
http_cache_port_t              udp      3130
http_port_t                    tcp      80, 81, 443, 488, 8008, 8009, 8443, 9000
pegasus_http_port_t            tcp      5988
pegasus_https_port_t           tcp      5989

And allow 8081:

semanage port -a -t http_port_t -p tcp 8081
  • Is it really about the port? I think SELinux was denying him access to the config file: ... { getattr } .. path=".......".... Please correct me if I'm wrong. – Ayman Nedjmeddine Apr 18 '17 at 11:56

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