Given a class instance, is it possible to determine if it implements a particular interface? As far as I know, there isn't a built-in function to do this directly. What options do I have (if any)?

up vote 215 down vote accepted
interface IInterface
{
}

class TheClass implements IInterface
{
}

$cls = new TheClass();
if ($cls instanceof IInterface) {
    echo "yes";
}

You can use the "instanceof" operator. To use it, the left operand is a class instance and the right operand is an interface. It returns true if the object implements a particular interface.

As therefromhere points out, you can use class_implements(). Just as with Reflection, this allows you to specify the class name as a string and doesn't require an instance of the class:

interface IInterface
{
}

class TheClass implements IInterface
{
}

$interfaces = class_implements('TheClass');

if (isset($interfaces['IInterface'])) {
    echo "Yes!";
}

class_implements() is part of the SPL extension.

See: http://php.net/manual/en/function.class-implements.php

Performance Tests

Some simple performance tests show the costs of each approach:

Given an instance of an object

Object construction outside the loop (100,000 iterations)
 ____________________________________________
| class_implements | Reflection | instanceOf |
|------------------|------------|------------|
| 140 ms           | 290 ms     | 35 ms      |
'--------------------------------------------'

Object construction inside the loop (100,000 iterations)
 ____________________________________________
| class_implements | Reflection | instanceOf |
|------------------|------------|------------|
| 182 ms           | 340 ms     | 83 ms      | Cheap Constructor
| 431 ms           | 607 ms     | 338 ms     | Expensive Constructor
'--------------------------------------------'

Given only a class name

100,000 iterations
 ____________________________________________
| class_implements | Reflection | instanceOf |
|------------------|------------|------------|
| 149 ms           | 295 ms     | N/A        |
'--------------------------------------------'

Where the expensive __construct() is:

public function __construct() {
    $tmp = array(
        'foo' => 'bar',
        'this' => 'that'
    );  

    $in = in_array('those', $tmp);
}

These tests are based on this simple code.

  • 10
    Thank you for the performance tests as well. Very helpful. – four43 Feb 12 '13 at 17:27

nlaq points out that instanceof can be used to test if the object is an instance of a class that implements an interface.

But instanceof doesn't distinguish between a class type and an interface. You don't know if the object is a class that happens to be called IInterface.

You can also use the reflection API in PHP to test this more specifically:

$class = new ReflectionClass('TheClass');
if ($class->implementsInterface('IInterface'))
{
  print "Yep!\n";
}

See http://php.net/manual/en/book.reflection.php

  • 2
    This can be used on "static" classes – Znarkus Aug 23 '09 at 9:41
  • 4
    See also class_implements() – John Carter Nov 15 '11 at 21:54
  • @therefromhere: Thanks, good tip. That's part of the SPL extension. My answer used the Reflection extension. – Bill Karwin Nov 15 '11 at 22:01
  • 2
    If you use namespaces than there won't be an ambiguousness between interfaces and classes with the same name and you can safely use instanceof again. – flu Mar 21 '12 at 16:18
  • +1 for class_implements() since its obviously quicker to call class_implements and then in_array, instead of making a complete reflection – Nickolaus Mar 17 '17 at 14:20

Just to help future searches is_subclass_of is also a good variant (for PHP 5.3.7+):

if (is_subclass_of($my_class_instance, 'ISomeInterfaceName')){
    echo 'I can do it!';
}

You can also do the following

public function yourMethod(YourInterface $objectSupposedToBeImplementing) {
   //.....
}

It will throw an recoverable error if the $objectSupposedToBeImplementing does not implement YourInterface Interface.

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