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Recently I am confusing about the definition of underflow of IEEE754 standard. We know that if an implementation doesn't support subnormal numbers, then the smallest number that can be represented is MinNorm = 1.0 * 2^-126. For any operation, if its result is smaller than MinNorm, will be regard as underflow. But if an implementation support subnormal numbers, then the smallest number that can be represented is MinSubnorm = 1.0 * 2^-149. Now here is the question: if a operation's result is smaller than MinNorm, if it's underflow? How about smaller than MinSubnorm ?

And now I am working on the implementation of a FPU which support the subnormal numbers. We assume that the result before rounding is strictly between -MinNorm and +MinNorm and it will also be smaller than MinNorm after rounding(representable using subnormal numbers). What would I regard it as? underflow or non-underflow? if i need to set the status bit of underflow?

I have found some imformation online, but opinons diverge as follow:

  1. http://www.cs.umd.edu/class/sum2003/cmsc311/Notes/Data/underflow.html Underflow occurs when you perform an operation that's smaller than the smallest magnitude non-zero number. In IEEE 754 single precision this means a value which has has magnitude (i.e., absolute value) less than 1.0 x 2-149.

  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arithmetic_underflow Arithmetic underflow can occur when the true result of a floating point operation is smaller in magnitude (that is, closer to zero) than the smallest value representable as a normal floating point number in the target datatype

  • w.r.t. IEEE 754, the wikipedia reference is more correct. Roughly speaking, a result smaller than the smallest normal number gives underflow. The details are rather subtle, though: the cutoff isn't necessarily exactly MinNorm. Google for "underflow before rounding" and "underflow after rounding" for more information. There are also subtleties with respect to the underflow flag versus the underflow signal. – Mark Dickinson Dec 12 '14 at 10:45
  • And in reference 1, "an operation that's smaller than... " doesn't make much sense. What's the size of an operation? </nit>. – Mark Dickinson Dec 12 '14 at 10:47
  • thanks! But now I am working on the implementation of a FPU which support the subnormal numbers. So what should i do when i set the status and flag bits if it get a result smaller than MinNorm? regard it as underflow? or when it is smaller than MinSubnorm? – dawudianfen Dec 12 '14 at 12:13
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    You'll probably want to get a copy of IEEE 754 (if you haven't already) and follow that. The underflow rules are described in section 7.5. You need to decide whether you want to detect underflow "after rounding" or "before rounding". The cutoff for underflow detection is very slightly different in the two cases. "before rounding" is simplest to describe (but not necessarily to implement): if the true result is nonzero and strictly smaller than MinNorm, the underflow exception should be signaled. (But the flag isn't necessarily set; again, see the standard for the details.) – Mark Dickinson Dec 12 '14 at 12:54
  • OK. I got it according to @Simon Byrne's answer and the IEEE754 Document. Thank you! – dawudianfen Dec 12 '14 at 14:34
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The IEEE754 2008 standard (§7.5) defines that the underflow exception shall be signalled when the result is

  1. non-zero, and
  2. strictly between -MinNorm and +MinNorm: it leaves it up to implementation as to whether this is before or after rounding, so you could have values just below minNorm that get rounded up and don't signal the exception.

So in this case, wikipedia is correct.

UPDATE: The default rules are that you DO set the status bit, unless the result is exact. e.g if a subnormal result is obtained from an addition or subtraction, then no rounding needs to occur, so you won't set the underflow status bit. On the other hand, if you have a number 1.0001 and you multiply it by 2^-149, then the result can't be exactly represented, and will be rounded to 2^-149, so you would set the underflow and inexact status bits.

  • Thanks, but if my implementation support subnormal numbers and We assume that the result before rounding is strictly between -MinNorm and +MinNorm and it will be smaller than MinNorm after rounding(representable using subnormal numbers). What would I regard it as? underflow or non-underflow? – dawudianfen Dec 12 '14 at 12:23
  • Sorry, I missed that bit. See my updated answer. – Simon Byrne Dec 12 '14 at 13:00
  • OK. I got it. thank you ! – dawudianfen Dec 12 '14 at 14:31
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IEEE 754 supports gradual underflow. It begins when a number is smaller than the smallest normal floating point number, as described by your second quote, and ends with total underflow to zero, as described by your first.

  • Thank you. Yes, I know that. But if I need to set the status bit of underflow when the result is gradual underflow in the implementation's perspective? – dawudianfen Dec 12 '14 at 12:33

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