0

I wrote this program:

#include <conio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    char ch='a';
    while(ch!='y'&&ch!='n')
    {
        printf("\nDo you want to print the output?(y/n)");
        scanf("%c",&ch);
    }
    if(ch=='y')
        printf("\n accepted!");
    getch();
}

expected output:

Do you want to print the output?(y/n)1
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)5
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)y
accepted!

Instead I get:

Do you want to print the output?(y/n)
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)1

Do you want to print the output?(y/n)
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)5

Do you want to print the output?(y/n)
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)y
accepted!

I don't know that why the sentence"Do you want to print the output?(y/n)" is written twice in output?

1
  • 3
    Because printf() is called twice per input. scanf("%c",&ch); leaves a newline char in the input stream which is consumed by the next call to the scanf().
    – P.P
    Dec 12, 2014 at 9:43

4 Answers 4

5

Beacuse scanf accepts a \n character and leaves it in the buffer. To consume that character you can use:

scanf(" %c",&ch);
1
  • Also OP has to remove the new line character in the printf statement otherwise the output isn't like OP want's it
    – Rizier123
    Dec 12, 2014 at 9:50
2

This should work for you:

(You have to remove all '\n' and put a space before %c)

(Because scanf read's everything to \n and the new line is still in the buffer, so in the next iteration the new line get's read from scanf)

#include <conio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
void main()
{
    char ch='a';
    while(ch!='y'&&ch!='n')
    {
        printf("Do you want to print the output?(y/n)");
        scanf(" %c",&ch);
    }
    if(ch=='y')
        printf("accepted!");
    getch();
}

So you get your output:

Do you want to print the output?(y/n)1
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)5
Do you want to print the output?(y/n)y
accepted!
3
  • Without newlines, the output from printf will not be written. Newline causes the output to be flushed. Dec 12, 2014 at 9:45
  • @stakx it's because if you print something without '\n' it's logical that you'll print another thing with a '\n'. For that, Printf wait a '\n' to flush
    – Charlon
    Dec 12, 2014 at 9:50
  • 2
    @Charlon: That's beside the point. I know what '\n' does. I simply wanted to point out that this answer was lacking an explanation of why the shown code fixes the issue. Explanations are much more valuable than mere here-is-the-fixed-code-for-you examples. But it's fixed now, so my comment is no longer necessary. Dec 12, 2014 at 9:56
0

Make the scanf in your function like this.

scanf(" %c",&ch);

Reason for making like this. When you are giving an input to that question that time enter will be pressed. So here when the enter is pressed newline character is placed. So scanf get the newline as a character then the loop will continue for the next time. If you give the spaces before the control string it will skip the white line characters from our input, then it ask the input for that.

0

Problem with the input buffer. However, the solution is very simple:

instead of scanf(" %c",&ch);, use:

do { ch=getchar(); } while(ch=='\n');

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy