50

Think to a C function that return something that must be freed, for example the POSIX's strdup(). I want to use that function in C++11 and avoid any chance of leaks, is this a correct way?

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>
#include <string.h>

int main() {
    char const* t { "Hi stackoverflow!" };
    std::unique_ptr<char, void(*)(void*)>
        t_copy { strdup(t), std::free };

    std::cout << t_copy.get() << " <- this is the copy!" <<std::endl;
}

Assuming it makes sense, it is possible to use a similar pattern with non-pointers? For example for the POSIX's function open that returns an int?

  • 4
    This question finally explained to me why deleters are useful. – Dan Dec 12 '14 at 16:29
  • The question uses unspecified/undefined behavior and is not guaranteed to work, because it takes the address of a function from the standard library. My solution is guaranteed to work, because it only calls free instead of taking its address. – PeterSom Apr 9 '18 at 14:21
60

What you have is extremely likely to work in practice, but not strictly correct. You can make it even more likely to work as follows:

std::unique_ptr<char, decltype(std::free) *>
    t_copy { strdup(t), std::free };

The reason is that the function type of std::free is not guaranteed to be void(void*). It is guaranteed to be callable when passed a void*, and in that case to return void, but there are at least two function types that match that specification: one with C linkage, and one with C++ linkage. Most compilers pay no attention to that, but for correctness, you should avoid making assumptions about it.

However, even then, this is not strictly correct. As pointed out by @PeterSom in the comments, C++ allows implementations to e.g. make std::free an overloaded function, in which case both your and my use of std::free would be ambiguous. This is not a specific permission granted for std::free, it's a permission granted for pretty much any standard library function. To avoid this problem, a custom function or functor (as in his answer) is required.

Assuming it makes sense, it is possible to use a similar pattern with non-pointers?

Not with unique_ptr, which is really specific to pointers. But you could create your own class, similar to unique_ptr, but without making assumptions about the object being wrapped.

  • Using decltype() really underline what deleter you want to use and I like it and maybe it is worthy another question. However, is the type of extern "C" { void f(void*) } and void f(void*) different? I thought the difference was only in the symbol name. At very lease you can use the same kind of function pointers... – Paolo.Bolzoni Dec 12 '14 at 10:09
  • 4
    @Paolo.Bolzoni: Yes, they are different types, and you can't (portably) use the same pointer type. – Mike Seymour Dec 12 '14 at 10:37
  • 3
    @Paolo.Bolzoni A few implementations really complain about extern "C" { void f(); } void (*fp)() = f; with a message about assignment from an incompatible pointer type. I think I remember reading that HP's is one implementation that flat out rejects it, but I have no way to verify that. Sun's (now Oracle's) is another implementation that pays attention to it, but it allows such implicit conversions with a warning (and that I have seen myself). – user743382 Dec 12 '14 at 10:47
  • 1
    You are right gentlemen. In my system std::is_same return true for the two decltypes, but I checked the standard and yes different linkage means different type. There is always something to learn. – Paolo.Bolzoni Dec 12 '14 at 10:51
  • 1
    @cmaster They could legitimately have different calling conventions, the C convention for compatibility, the C++ convention a better one. As for avoiding decltype: create typedefs inside extern "C" blocks. But you'd be surprised how little it's needed. – user743382 Dec 12 '14 at 22:46
29

The original question (and hvd's answer) introduce a per-pointer overhead, so such a unique_ptr is twice the size than one derived with std::make_unique. In addition, I would formulate the decltype directly:

std::unique_ptr<char, decltype(&std::free)>
    t_copy { strdup(t), &std::free };

If one has many of those C-API-derived pointers that extra space can be a burden hindering adoption of safe C++ RAII for C++ code wrapping existing POSIX style APIs requiring to be free()d. Another problem that can arise, is when you use char const in the above situation, you get a compile error, because you can not automatically convert a char const * to the Parameter type of free(void *).

I suggest to use a dedicated deleter type, not one built on the fly, so that the space overhead goes away and the required const_cast is also not a problem. A template alias then can easily be used to wrap C-API-derived pointers:

struct free_deleter{
    template <typename T>
    void operator()(T *p) const {
        std::free(const_cast<std::remove_const_t<T>*>(p));
    }
};
template <typename T>
using unique_C_ptr=std::unique_ptr<T,free_deleter>;
static_assert(sizeof(char *)==
              sizeof(unique_C_ptr<char>),""); // ensure no overhead

The example now becomes

unique_C_ptr<char const> t_copy { strdup(t) };

I will suggest that that mechanism should be made available in the C++ Core Guidelines support library ( maybe with a better naming ), so it can be made available for code bases transitioning to modern C++ ( success open ).

  • I know there are other more generic options to wrap deleter code into the unique_ptr's type, but they might be more involved and not as simple to understand and implement. – PeterSom Apr 26 '17 at 6:10
  • I like this answer and agree with most of it, except for saying my answer introduces overhead. It does not: it has the same overhead as what's in the question. I merely did not address that aspect (and hadn't thought of it, at least not when writing my answer). – user743382 Apr 28 '17 at 16:13
  • 1
    Yes, the original question already had the unnecessary overhead. And I was adding my answer, becausethat overhead was used as an excuse for not using unique_ptr for the purpose, and because my suggestion was objected on the std mailing list as something to put into the C++ Standard. And yes, until a week ago,I also hadn't thought of this solution consciously. – PeterSom Apr 28 '17 at 21:39
  • If you agree that my answer is not what introduces the overhead, please edit your answer to no longer make that claim. For instance: "The answer <...> does not fix the per-pointer overhead, so..." would seem to me to not detract from the point of your answer. – user743382 Apr 29 '17 at 8:29
  • see above. The original question and answer are undefined behavior, because they take the address of a standard library function, which is not defined in the standard. Implementors are free to provide other overloads or have wider parameter lists providing default arguments. Just calling a function from the standard library is guaranteed to work. – PeterSom Apr 9 '18 at 14:20
10

Assuming it makes sense, it is possible to use a similar pattern with non-pointers? For example for the POSIX's function open that returns an int?

Yes, it can be done. You need a "pointer" type that satisfies the NullablePointer requirements:

struct handle_wrapper {

    handle_wrapper() noexcept : handle(-1) {}
    explicit handle_wrapper(int h) noexcept : handle(h) {}
    handle_wrapper(std::nullptr_t)  noexcept : handle_wrapper() {}

    int operator *() const noexcept { return handle; }
    explicit operator bool() const noexcept { return *this != nullptr; }

    friend bool operator!=(const handle_wrapper& a, const handle_wrapper& b) noexcept {
        return a.handle != b.handle;
    }

    friend bool operator==(const handle_wrapper& a, const handle_wrapper& b) noexcept {
        return a.handle == b.handle;
    }

    int handle;
};

Note that we use -1 as the null handle value here because that's what open() returns on failure. It's also very easy to templatize this code so that it accepts other handle types and/or invalid values.

Then

struct posix_close
{
    using pointer = handle_wrapper;
    void operator()(pointer fd) const
    {
        close(*fd);
    }
};

int
main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<int, posix_close> p(handle_wrapper(open("testing", O_CREAT)));
    int fd = *p.get();
}

Demo.

  • Sounds correct, but if I need to write a class like that probably using finally and a lambda is easier to read... ( finally C++ implementation: stackoverflow.com/a/25510879/1876111 ) – Paolo.Bolzoni Dec 14 '14 at 13:05
  • Better yet, specialise std::default_delete<handle_wrapper> and create a function wrap_open, then a user can write simply auto p = std::make_unique(wrap_open("testing", O_CREAT));. – Konrad Rudolph Jan 15 at 14:16
7

Assuming it makes sense, it is possible to use a similar pattern with non-pointers? For example for the POSIX's function open that returns an int?

Sure, using Howard's Hinnant tutorial on unique_ptr, we can see a motivating example:

// For open
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

// For close
#include <unistd.h>

// For unique_ptr
#include <memory>

int main()
{
    auto handle_deleter = [] (int* handle) {
        close(*handle);
    };

    int handle = open("main.cpp", O_RDONLY);
    std::unique_ptr<int, decltype(handle_deleter)> uptr
        { &handle, handle_deleter };
}

Alternatively you can use a functor instead of a lambda:

struct close_handler
{
    void operator()(int* handle) const
    {
        close(*handle);
    }
};

int main()
{
    int handle = open("main.cpp", O_RDONLY);
    std::unique_ptr<int, close_handler> uptr
        { &handle };
}

The example can be further reduced if we use a typedef and a "factory" function.

using handle = int;
using handle_ptr = std::unique_ptr<handle, close_handler>;

template <typename... T>
handle_ptr get_file_handle(T&&... args)
{
    return handle_ptr(new handle{open(std::forward<T>(args)...)});
}

int main()
{
    handle_ptr hp = get_file_handle("main.cpp", O_RDONLY);
}
  • 7
    Since you're now storing a pointer to the handle, rather than the handle itself, there are possible problems with the object's lifetime if handle is destroyed before the unique_ptr is. You attempt to address that by using new handle, but in that case, don't forget that close_handler will need to not just close the handle, it also needs to free the memory, or you've got a leak. – user743382 Dec 12 '14 at 11:22
  • 2
    In other words the operator() needs a delete handle to work correctly. – ratchet freak Dec 12 '14 at 13:47
  • This works perfect with win32 functions too, e.g.: std::unique_ptr<LPWSTR, decltype(&::LocalFree)> argv(CommandLineToArgvW(commandLine, &argc), ::LocalFree) – kiewic Mar 8 '17 at 21:28

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