11

I was wondering if there's any built-in or well-established way (i.e. via lambda) to go through the elements of an std::list and find all the ones that match a given value? I know I can iterate through all of them, but I thought I'd ask if there's a way to get an iterator that iterates through just the elements that match a given criteria? My sample below only gives me the iterator to the first matching element.

#include <list>
#include <algorithm>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    std::list<int> List;
    List.push_back(100);
    List.push_back(200);
    List.push_back(300);
    List.push_back(100);
    int findValue = 100;

    auto it = std::find_if(List.begin(), List.end(), [findValue](const int value)
    {
        return (value == findValue);
    });

    if (it != List.end())
    {
        for (; it != List.end(); ++it)
        {
            printf("%d\n", * it);
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

Thanks for any feedback.

  • Repeatedly call find_if to find the remaining matches, just increment the begin iterator prior to each call (assuming the last call resulted in a match). If you do this often enough, write a function. And if all you're doing is using operator== within the predicate, there's no need for find_if, find does that for you. – Praetorian Dec 13 '14 at 2:27
  • 6
    "if there's a way to get an iterator that iterates through just the elements that match a given criteria" Maybe Filter Iterators? – dyp Dec 13 '14 at 2:33
11

std::find_if is a generalisation of std::find for when you need a function to check for the elements you want, rather than a simple test for equality. If you just want to do a simple test for equality then there's no need for the generalised form, and the lambda just adds complexity and verbosity. Just use std::find(begin, end, findValue) instead:

std::vector<std::list<int>::const_iterator> matches;
auto i = list.begin(), end = list.end();
while (i != end)
{
  i = std::find(i, end, findValue);
  if (i != end)
    matches.push_back(i++);
}

But rather than calling find in a loop I'd just write the loop manually:

std::vector<std::list<int>::const_iterator> matches;
for (auto i = list.begin(), toofar = l.end(); i != toofar; ++i)
  if (*i == findValue)
    matches.push_back(i);
  • wouldn't std::copy() check the whole list only once O(N), while yours would do O(x*N)? Better look the other answers too :) @smac89 has a good one bellow – Paiusco Sep 1 '20 at 15:30
  • @Paiusco why would mine not be O(N)? each std::find starts where the previous find stopped. – Jonathan Wakely Sep 2 '20 at 17:03
26

Updated answer

With the advent of C++20 just around the corner, the standard library has now introduced the concept of ranges which comes with view adapters and are simply lazy views over collections and their transformations.

This means you can now have an "iterator" which can be used to obtain a filtered and transformed view of an underlying container/collection, without having to create several iterators or even allocate memory.

Having said that, this is a way to create a view over just the filtered elements of your list:

// List is your std::list
auto matching_100 = List | std::views::filter([](auto &v) {
  return v == 100;
});

How sweet is that? All you need to use all that?

#include <ranges>

Try it out


Previous answer

Using copy_if and iterators:

#include <list>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::list<int> List;
    List.push_back(100);
    List.push_back(200);
    List.push_back(300);
    List.push_back(100);
    int findValue = 100;

    std::copy_if(List.begin(), List.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"), [&](int v) {
        return v == findValue;
    });
    return 0;
}

If you don't want to directly output the results and want to fill another container with the matches:

std::vector<int> matches;
std::copy_if(List.begin(), List.end(), std::back_inserter(matches), [&](int v) {
    return v == findValue;
});
18

boost::filter_iterator allows you to work with only the elements of a iterable that satisfy a predicate. Given a predicate Pred and a container Cont,

auto begin_iter = boost::make_filter_iterator(Pred, std::begin(Cont), std::end(Cont));
auto end_iter = boost::make_filter_iterator(Pred, std::end(Cont), std::end(Cont));

You can now use begin_iter and end_iter as if they were the begin and end iterators of a container containing only those elements of Cont that satisfied Pred. Another added advantage is that you can wrap the iterators in a boost::iterator_range and use it in places which expect a iterable object, like a range-based for loop like this:

auto range = boost::make_iterator_range(begin_iter, end_iter);
for(auto x : range) do_something(x);

In particular, setting Pred to a functor(could be a lambda) that checks for equality with your fixed value will give you the iterators you need.

  • 1
    This is the best answer! – PeterT May 14 '17 at 23:05
  • #include <boost/iterator/filter_iterator.hpp> #include <boost/range/iterator_range.hpp> – ManuelH Feb 12 '19 at 9:12
  • Question was about std::list; an answer contained within the standard library would be legit. – kevr Sep 22 '19 at 9:49
1

std::partition lets you simply move all elements matching the predicate to the front of the container (first partition). The return value is an iterator pointing to the first element of the second partition (containing the non matching elements). That's pretty much all you need to "filter" a container.

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