1

I'm working on developing a simple Processing application that creates a sound effect whenever a hammer hits an non-moving shape. However, I'm having difficulties attempting to have the code detect whenever the hammer object collides with the shape object, and have begun resorting to unprofessional workarounds as seen in the code block commented under 'testing'. Any help on creating a solution to this problem would be massively appreciated

import oscP5.*;
import netP5.*;

OscP5 oscP5;
NetAddress myRemoteLocation;

float bx;
float by;
int boxSizeX = 160;
int boxSizeY = 30;
boolean overBox = true;
boolean locked = false;
float xOffset = 0.0; 
float yOffset = 0.0; 
float angle = 4.70;

BeatBall b1 = new BeatBall(210,425,60, 1);

void setup()
{
  size(800, 600);
  smooth();
  frameRate(120);
  bx = width/2.0;
  by = height/2.0;

    oscP5 = new OscP5(this,12001);

  /* myRemoteLocation is a NetAddress. a NetAddress takes 2 parameters,
   * an ip address and a port number. myRemoteLocation is used as parameter in
   * oscP5.send() when sending osc packets to another computer, device, 
   * application. usage see below. for testing purposes the listening port
   * and the port of the remote location address are the same, hence you will
   * send messages back to this sketch.
   */
  myRemoteLocation = new NetAddress("127.0.0.1",12000);
}

void draw()
{ 
  background(0);

  pushMatrix();
  translate(400, 425);
  rotate(angle);
  fill(222,223,255);
  Hammer h = new Hammer(135, -67,  boxSizeY+25, boxSizeX-25, 1);
  h.displayHammer();
  rect(-25, -15, boxSizeX, boxSizeY);
  popMatrix();

  b1.displayBall();

   //Testing
   if(angle < -2.6561418 && angle > -3.043227)
     {
       background(120);
       b1.collide();
     }

     println(angle);
}



void mousePressed() 
{
  xOffset = mouseX-bx; 
  yOffset = mouseY-by; 
}

void mouseDragged()
{
    bx = mouseX-xOffset; 
    by = mouseY-yOffset; 
   angle = atan2(mouseY - 400, mouseX - 400);
}

//BEATBALL CLASS

class BeatBall {
  float x, y;
  float diameter;
  float vx = 0;
  float vy = 0;
  int id;

  BeatBall(float xin, float yin, float din, int idin) {
    x = xin;
    y = yin;
    diameter = din;
    id = idin;
  } 

  void collide() 
  {

    /* Collision Example
      float dx = Hammer.x - x;
      float dy = Hammer.y - y;
      float distance = sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy);
      float minDist = others[i].diameter/2 + diameter/2;
      if (distance < minDist)
      { 
        float angle = atan2(dy, dx);
        float targetX = x + cos(angle) * minDist;
        float targetY = y + sin(angle) * minDist;
        float ax = (targetX - others[i].x) * spring;
        float ay = (targetY - others[i].y) * spring;
        vx -= ax;
        vy -= ay;
        others[i].vx += ax;
        others[i].vy += ay;
       */ 

      OscMessage myMessage = new OscMessage("/bubble");
      print(diameter + " ");
      myMessage.add( 1/(diameter*diameter) * 1000000); /* add an int to the osc message */

      /* send the message */
      oscP5.send(myMessage, myRemoteLocation); 

     //}
  }

  void displayBall() 
  {
    fill(191,89,0);
    ellipse(x, y, diameter, diameter);   
  }


}

//HAMMER CLASS

class Hammer {
  float x, y;
  float sizeX, sizeY;
  float vx = 0;
  float vy = 0;
  int id;

  Hammer(float xin, float yin, float sxin, float syin, int idin) {
    x = xin;
    y = yin;
    sizeX = sxin;
    sizeY = syin;
    id = idin;
  } 

   void displayHammer() 
  {
    fill(222,223,255);
    rect(x, y, sizeX, sizeY); 
  }

}
2

I've built a suite of collision detection functions for Processing that might help.

If you can simplify things and think of the objects as circles, you can use the Pythagorean Theorem to check their distance. (Updated to a function, as requested.)

// variables for your objects - where are they and how big?
float ballX, ballY;
float ballRadius;
float hammerX, hammerY;
float hammerRadius;

void setup() {

  // check for a collision
  boolean hit = ballBallCollision(ballX, ballY, ballRadius, hammerX, hammerY, hammerRadius);
  if (hit) {
    // hit!
  }
  else {
    // not :(
  }
}

// a function to check for ball-ball collision
boolean ballBallCollision(float ballX, float ballY, float ballRadius, float hammerX, float hammerY, float hammerRadius) {
  // calculate distance between the objects using the Pythagorean Theorem
  float xDist = hammerX - ballX;
  float xDist = hammerY - ballY;
  float dist = sqrt( (xDist*xDist) + (yDist*yDist) );

  if (dist < ballRadius + hammerRadius) {
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}
  • Thanks for the link, I'll need to check those out later on. But in terms of your second suggestion, in relation to my code I've already developed how would you integrate this algorithm? Apologies for the hand-holding, it's just that my brain is fried at the moment wrestling with this problem and other projects that I'm working on and I'd appreciate as much help as I can get. – Liam Dec 14 '14 at 23:46
  • Updated as a function. Nothing different about the algorithm, just how you use it. – JeffThompson Dec 15 '14 at 0:37
  • Did that work? Please accept the answer if so :) – JeffThompson Dec 15 '14 at 16:39
  • 1
    I had a fair bit of difficulty correctly getting the function to work on my end, and due to time constraints I ended up implementing a workaround solution instead. It was no fault of you own - in fact you were more then helpful, I just didn't have enough time. But this will definitely help in later projects, so I will accept the answer nevertheless. Thanks! – Liam Dec 15 '14 at 18:02

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