3

Suppose the following definition of an abstract type A:

public abstract class A<T, J> : where J : A<T, J>, new()
{
    public virtual T Value { get; set; }

    //Error: User-defined conversion must convert to or from the enclosing type
    public static implicit operator J(T value)
    {
        return new J
        {
            Value = value
        };
    }
}

The implicit operator is causing the compiler to emit the error "User-defined conversion must convert to or from the enclosing type."

The implicit operator converts to a derived type of the enclosing type. Is this an error or a limitation of C#?

I'm trying to generalize the boxing of type T to J.

Update:

Continuing from that error, I've tried the following:

public abstract class A<T, J> : where J : Primary<T, J>, new()
{
    public virtual T Value { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator A<T, J>(T value)
    {
        return new J
        {
            Value = value
        };
    }

    public static implicit operator J(A<T, J> value)
    {
        return value as J;
    }
}

This does prevent the compiler error (as expected), although it then forces explicit conversion. Which is not desirable.

Essentially, I would like to be able to do the following:

public class B { }

public class C : A<B, C> 
{ 
    public C Foo(B b)
    {
        return b;
    }
}

Any other alternatives to the above to provide generalized implicit boxing of a type?

3

The closest that you can get to making your class A<T, J> to work is this:

public class A<T, J> where J : A<T, J>, new()
{
    public virtual T Value { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator A<T, J>(T value)
    {
        return new A<T, J>
        {
            Value = value
        };
    }
}

But as soon as you mark this abstract it won't work because of the new A<T, J>. So this is where it is nice to then be able to rely on the where J : A<T, J>, new() to say that you're creating a derived type. But that's then no longer valid c# syntax.

The bottom-line is that you can't do what you're hoping to do as an implicit conversion.

You can do an explicit conversion:

public abstract class A<T, J> where J : A<T, J>, new()
{
    public virtual T Value { get; set; }

    public static J Convert(T value)
    {
        return new J
        {
            Value = value
        };
    }
}

Now this would work:

public class B { }

public class C : A<B, C> 
{ 
    public C Foo(B b)
    {
        return C.Convert(b);
    }
}

There's very little net difference in the resulting code, but you have to do an explicit conversion (which isn't a bad thing for code readability and maintenance.)

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