1

I have a script that opens .txt file, creates an array, and does some subsitutions. Then I close and open the file handle and do a deletion of duplicate lines based on four columns and keeping the most recent line. This all does what I want. But when I try and run it without the open and close in the middle of the script I get a blank file.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
#use diagnostics;

my $file = "c:\\tmp.txt";
open( my $fh, "<", $file ) or die $!;

my $OUTNET = "c:\\NETtmp.txt";
open( OUTPUT, ">", "$OUTNET" ) or die $!;
my @array;

foreach (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    if ($_ =~ m/^\s+\d/) {

        $_ =~ s/^\s+//g;
        $_ =~ s/\s+$//g;
        $_ =~ s/\s+/,/g;
        print  " $_  \n";
        printf OUTPUT "$_  \n";
    }
}
close OUTPUT; # Do I need to save and then reopen the file here?

my $file2 = "c:\\NETtmp.txt";
my $OUTNET2 = "c:\\final.txt";

open my $in,  '<', $file2 or die $!;
open my $out, '>', $OUTNET2 or die $!;
seek $in, 0, 0;
my %hash;

while (<$in>) {
    my $key = join ',', ( split /,/ )[ 1, 2, 3, 4 ];
    printf $out $_ unless $hash{$key}++;
}
close $out;
close $in;
  • Do you think that ( split /,/ )[ 1, 2, 3, 4 ] creates a string composed of 4 different elements? Because it does not. – TLP Dec 15 '14 at 1:46
  • You did not run this code, because it is not strict compliant. It is quite useless to post questions about code that you did not actually run. You should always cut and paste all of the relevant code, and preferably make an sscce. – TLP Dec 15 '14 at 2:55
  • this worked my $file = "c:\\tmp.txt"; open( my $fh, "<", $file ) or die $!; my @array; foreach (<$fh>) { chomp; if ( $_ =~ m/^\s+\d/ ) { $_ =~ s/^\s+//g; $_ =~ s/\s+$//g; $_ =~ s/\s+/,/g; push @array, "$_ \n"; }} my $OUTNET2 = "c:\\final.txt"; open my $out, '>', $OUTNET2 or die $!; my %hash; for (@array) { my $key = join ',', ( split /,/ )[ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; print $out $_ unless $hash{$key}++; } </code> – user3360439 Dec 15 '14 at 22:03
2

This code is very broken, so I will just go through it all and comment as I go.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
#use diagnostics;

Using strict and warnings is a good idea.

my $file = "c:\\tmp.txt";
open( my $fh, "+>", $file ) or die $!;

Using the + modes for open is almost always the wrong thing to do. It is much easier to write to a new file and copy that over the old, if replacement of content is what you want.

my $OUTtmp = "c:\\OUTtmp.txt";
open( OUTPUT, ">", "$OUTtmp" ) or die;

You never have to quote a variable like this. I assume you are trying to force stringification, but Perl does that automatically when it needs to. In this case "$OUTtmp" is exactly the same as $OUTtmp.

my @array;

Note that @array is now empty.

foreach (<$fh>) {
    chomp;
    if ( $_ =~ m/^\s+\d/ ) {
        $_ =~ s/^\s+//g;
        $_ =~ s/\s+$//g;
        $_ =~ s/\s+/,/g;
        # print  " $_  \n";
        # printf OUTPUT "$_  \n";
    }
}

This loop just goes through the file and changes lines, but does not store them anywhere. So any changes are lost.

#close $fh;
#close OUTPUT;
seek $fh, 0, 0;
my %hash = @array;

Remember that @array is empty, so now %hash is empty too.

while (<$fh>) {
    my $key = ( split /,/ )[ 1, 2, 3, 4 ];

This is unlikely doing what you expect. You are attempting to assign 4 scalar values to one scalar value, and that can never happen. A list slice in scalar context returns the last value it would return in list context. For example:

>perl -E"my $key = ( split /,/, 'a,b,c,d,e,f' )[ 1, 2, 3, 4 ]; say $key"
e

    printf OUTPUT $_ unless $hash{$key}++;
}

I assume this is your attempt at reading the file and dedupe it. This will only reuse the original file without changes, since the changes performed in the previous loop are lost.

close $fh;
close OUTPUT;

Files are automatically closed when the program ends, so you do not need to do this. Unless you are handling disc write errors.

  • 1
    Re ""$OUTtmp" is exactly the same as $OUTtmp", Not so. However, unless you know you have one of the rare situations where you need to force stringification, you should use $OUTtmp. – ikegami Dec 15 '14 at 2:48
0

The file mode "+>" clobbers the file. Change your file mode to +< and see if that works:

open( my $fh, "+<", $file ) or die $!

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