35

In my system, the insertion of data is always done through csv files via logstash. I never pre-define the mapping. But whenever I input a string it is always taken to be analyzed, as a result an entry like hello I am Sinha is split into hello,I,am,Sinha. Is there anyway I could change the default/dynamic mapping of elasticsearch so that all strings, irrespective of index, irrespective of type are taken to be not analyzed? Or is there a way of setting it in the .conf file? Say my conf file looks like

input {  
      file {
          path => "/home/sagnik/work/logstash-1.4.2/bin/promosms_dec15.csv"
          type => "promosms_dec15"
          start_position => "beginning"
          sincedb_path => "/dev/null"
      }
}
filter {

    csv {
        columns => ["Comm_Plan","Queue_Booking","Order_Reference","Multi_Ordertype"]
        separator => ","
    }  
    ruby {
          code => "event['Generation_Date'] = Date.parse(event['Generation_Date']);"
    }

}
output {  
    elasticsearch { 
        action => "index"
        host => "localhost"
        index => "promosms-%{+dd.MM.YYYY}"
        workers => 1
    }
}

I want all the strings to be not analyzed and I don't mind it being the default setting for all future data to be inserted into elasticsearch either

4 Answers 4

28

Just create a template. run

curl -XPUT localhost:9200/_template/template_1 -d '{
    "template": "*",
    "settings": {
        "index.refresh_interval": "5s"
    },
    "mappings": {
        "_default_": {
            "_all": {
                "enabled": true
            },
            "dynamic_templates": [
                {
                    "string_fields": {
                        "match": "*",
                        "match_mapping_type": "string",
                        "mapping": {
                            "index": "not_analyzed",
                            "omit_norms": true,
                            "type": "string"
                        }
                    }
                }
            ],
            "properties": {
                "@version": {
                    "type": "string",
                    "index": "not_analyzed"
                },
                "geoip": {
                    "type": "object",
                    "dynamic": true,
                    "path": "full",
                    "properties": {
                        "location": {
                            "type": "geo_point"
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}'
6
  • 9
    What exactly does this do? How does it work? Can you elaborate a bit more on what this template is and how it applies to the question?
    – Brad
    Nov 28, 2015 at 8:49
  • @Brad as you can see here, inside dynamic templates and properties, the index is set as not analyzed. As a result, if we input a string hello, I am Sinha it will be treated as one string and not split into hello I am Sinha Nov 30, 2015 at 10:24
  • what is the index name that this mapping applies to?
    – AbtPst
    Apr 21, 2016 at 13:56
  • 1
    it applies to all indices @AbtPst Apr 22, 2016 at 12:43
  • 1
    ok, that makes sense. what if i only want to apply to some fields of an index. lets say i have an index ind. the number of fields in the incoming data is not fixed but for sure there will be a string fieldd. I only want field d to be analyzed and all other string fields to be not analyzed.
    – AbtPst
    Apr 22, 2016 at 13:31
20

You can query the .raw version of your field. This was added in Logstash 1.3.1:

The logstash index template we provide adds a “.raw” field to every field you index. These “.raw” fields are set by logstash as “not_analyzed” so that no analysis or tokenization takes place – our original value is used as-is!

So if your field is called foo, you'd query foo.raw to return the not_analyzed (not split on delimiters) version.

6
  • 3
    the foo.raw fields are empty while the foo fields are filled. I don't get it Jan 17, 2016 at 8:42
  • 1
    @Roland Kofler Did you find out why they were empty?. I have the same issue Mar 18, 2016 at 7:35
  • 1
    @AviArro all I can remember it is intended that way. Sort of a hack. More I can't remember Mar 18, 2016 at 7:46
  • Is it a given that everyone with this question will be using logstash?
    – tadasajon
    Jul 18, 2016 at 18:40
  • 1
    @JonCrowell well yes and no. I stumbled back on my answer the other day when NOT using logstash. I couldn't rind the .raw field and realized it was something logstash created for me, so my answer here was not helpful. :) However, the question is tagged and refers to logstash, so makes sense that my answer is the accepted one. There are other related SO questions and answers about creating not_analyzed fields with vanilla Elasticsearch that can be referred upon.
    – Banjer
    Jul 18, 2016 at 18:55
13

Make a copy of the lib/logstash/outputs/elasticsearch/elasticsearch-template.json from your Logstash distribution (possibly installed as /opt/logstash/lib/logstash/outputs/elasticsearch/elasticsearch-template.json), modify it by replacing

"dynamic_templates" : [ {
  "string_fields" : {
    "match" : "*",
    "match_mapping_type" : "string",
    "mapping" : {
      "type" : "string", "index" : "analyzed", "omit_norms" : true,
      "fields" : {
        "raw" : {"type": "string", "index" : "not_analyzed", "ignore_above" : 256}
      }
    }
  }
} ],

with

"dynamic_templates" : [ {
  "string_fields" : {
    "match" : "*",
    "match_mapping_type" : "string",
    "mapping" : {
      "type" : "string", "index" : "not_analyzed", "omit_norms" : true
    }
  }
} ],

and point template for you output plugin to your modified file:

output {
  elasticsearch {
    ...
    template => "/path/to/my-elasticsearch-template.json"
  }
}

You can still override this default for particular fields.

6
  • That doesn't seem to give me desired results... I have a field named State which has an instance called West Bengal. When I plot a bar graph, I get 2 different legends namely west and bengal which is wrong. That problem is still there Dec 16, 2014 at 7:30
  • Is this in a new index? Keep in mind that changing the index template won't make a difference for existing data. Dec 16, 2014 at 7:40
  • I deleted the previous index, refreshed it and then inserted again. Yes, its in a new index Dec 16, 2014 at 8:16
  • Interesting. What if you get the mapping of the index and have a look at the actual mapping being used? Dec 16, 2014 at 8:53
  • It shows {"promosms-16.12.2014":{"mappings":{"promosms_dec15":{"properties":{..............,"State":{"type":"string"},.........}}}}} there is no information as to whether it is analyzed or not Dec 16, 2014 at 9:33
1

I think updating the mapping is wrong approach just to handle a field for reporting purposes. Sooner or later you may want to be able to search the field for tokens. If you are updating the field to "not_analyzed" and want to search for foo from a value "foo bar", you won't be able to do that.

A more graceful solution is to use kibana aggregation filters instead of terms. Something like below will search for the terms ivr04 and ivr02. So in your case you can have a filter "Hello I'm Sinha". Hope this helps.

enter image description here

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