15

I would be appreciative if someone could explain to me the difference between the following two pieces of code in terms of Visual Studio's Code Metrics rules. Why does the Maintainability Index increase slightly if I don't encapsulate everything within using ( )?

Sample 1 (MI score of 71)

public static String Sha1(String plainText)
{
    using (SHA1Managed sha1 = new SHA1Managed())
    {
        Byte[] text = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(plainText);
        Byte[] hashBytes = sha1.ComputeHash(text);
        return Convert.ToBase64String(hashBytes);    
    }
}

Sample 2 (MI score of 73)

public static String Sha1(String plainText)
{
    Byte[] text, hashBytes;
    using (SHA1Managed sha1 = new SHA1Managed())
    {
        text = Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(plainText);
        hashBytes = sha1.ComputeHash(text);
    }
    return Convert.ToBase64String(hashBytes);   
}

I understand metrics are meaningless outside of a broader context and understanding, and programmers should exercise discretion. While I could boost the score up to 76 with return Convert.ToBase64String(sha1.ComputeHash(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(plainText))), I shouldn't. I would clearly be just playing with numbers and it isn't truly any more readable or maintainable at that point. I am curious though as to what the logic might be behind the increase in this case. It's obviously not line-count.

  • The discussion around this question and its various answers suggests that the Maintainability Index is not very intuitive -- see also my post on the maintainability index, discussing various problems with this metric. – avandeursen Sep 13 '14 at 16:49
16

Having your variables all laid out at the top so you know what's in the function is more "maintainable", at least that's what whoever decides the rules for the code metrics thinks.

Whether that's actually true? Totally depends on the team working on the code. It seems you already know this by the tone of the question, but take almost all code metrics with a grain of salt, they're what someone thinks is best, that may not be true for teams outside of microsoft...do what's best for your team, not what some calculator tells you.

I wouldn't make changes that are detrimental to your and your team's coding performance (unless it's for actual performance or improved error handling, etc) that you think are less readable for getting a few points on the metrics board.

All that being said, if it gives you a very low maintainability, there probably is something worth looking at or breaking down into smaller chunks, as a very low score is probably not so acceptable, for pretty much any team.

  • 2
    I believe this is correct - in terms of explaining the numbers - but I think that the maintainability calculation is obsolete in this regard. Once upon a time it made sense to declare all your variables at the top - once upon a time (some) languages demanded it! - but that time is long past. Today, minimizing an identifier's lifespan contributes more to maintainability. – Carl Manaster May 1 '10 at 15:18
  • 1
    This is incorrect: the metrics don't care about the location of variables (although I think it's pretty well accepted by now that proximity to usage is a plus). As Dan Bryant points out, you're just seeing the effect of having two variables declared in one line (meaning Byte[] only appears once in the second method), making the method "shorter" in terms of Halstead Volume. – StriplingWarrior Mar 20 '14 at 20:00
8

This is an old question, but I just thought I'd add that the MI is partially based on Halstead volume, which is based on a count of 'operators' and 'operands'. If declaration of a variable by type is an 'operator', this would mean that Sample 2 has fewer operators, thus changing the score. In general, because the MI is a statistical measurement, it is of limited usefulness when dealing with small sample sizes (like a single short method.)

  • Interesting point, I wonder if the score would decrease by splitting Byte[] text, hashBytes into two lines – Mark Sowul Nov 25 '13 at 18:16
  • @MarkSowul: That will not affect Halstead, but will affect lines of code, which is also a component of the Maintainability index. – avandeursen Sep 13 '14 at 16:43
7

Because of the increased distance between the declaration of your variables and where they are used.

The rule is to reduce the variable span as much as possible, the span is the distance between the declaration of the variable and where it is used. As this distance increases, the risk increases that later code is introduced that affects the variable without the programmer realising the impact further down in the code.

Here is a link to a good book that covers this and many other topics on code quality. http://www.amazon.com/Code-Complete-Practical-Handbook-Construction/dp/0735619670/ref=dp_ob_title_bk

  • 3
    This would seem to be counter to the question, as the distance between declaration and usage is greater in the higher score. – Nick Craver May 1 '10 at 6:28
  • 1
    @Damian - The explanation is backwards from the result, sensible I agree, but doesn't explain the question. I also prefer the one with the lower score, but according to this answer, it should have a higher score, it does not. – Nick Craver May 1 '10 at 8:04
  • 1
    @Nick I wondered if the OP had got the values the wrong way around. I tested it in VS2010 and it appears not. Although I get different values: 70 and 69. Strange, but highlights your point that it should be takenwith a pinch of salt. – Damian Powell May 1 '10 at 8:32
  • 1
    I have been thinking about this, and while I guess only someone intimately involved with the analysis engine could give a real explanation for this, I wonder if the analysis engine is measuring the line length and saying that the "complexity" of the declaration and intitializing of the variables by calling functions is impacting the metric. I do not have access to VS now, what might be interesting to try is to take the first code and move the declaration of the variable into the scope of the using clause but still initialize on separate lines, what does that come back with? – Chris Taylor May 1 '10 at 9:07
  • 1
    Same numbers, @Chris. A lower value when the variables are defined and used within the using() block, than when they are defined outside the block. – Timothy May 1 '10 at 20:39
0

Myself, I'd rather see return Convert.ToBase64String(sha1.ComputeHash(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(plainText))); it's a should rather than a shouldn't. This form has the advantage of concisely expressing the actual data-flow; if you add a bunch of temporary variables and assignments, I now have to read the variable names and match up their occurrences to see what's actually happening.

  • 1
    I disagree. On one line, you have to first visually scan to find the inner most expression (plainText), then backward, to GetBytes. "Okay, we've got the bytes of the text". Then sha1.ComputeHash ("okay, now we take the SHA1"), and then finally to base 64. If you break this up into a couple lines, I think it is far easier to "step-through" line-by-line, and comprehend what is going on. If one chooses intelligent variable names, you don't have to "match up their occurrences", it just makes sense. – Jonathon Reinhart Aug 16 '12 at 0:48
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    Actually the one-liner expresses the exact opposite of the data flow because the method calls are basically prefix notation. The actual flow is plainText -> GetBytes -> ComputeHash -> ToBase64String. Laying it out line by line shows this. The one-liner you have to read right-to-left. And it's much harder to debug because you won't see the intermediate steps. Pretend there's a null reference exception. The line-by-line will show you instantly. How about the one-liner? – Mark Sowul Oct 15 '13 at 17:32
  • 1
    @MarkSowul I agree 100%. I always prefer readability than one liner with multiple chain of functions. If one of my team member does this, I'll tell him/her to refactor it. – Eriawan Kusumawardhono Oct 28 '13 at 3:00

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