Ok, so everyone knows you can make a triangle using this:

#triangle {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border-left: 50px solid transparent;
    border-right: 50px solid transparent;
    border-bottom: 100px solid red;
}

And that produces a solid, filled in triangle. But how would you make a hollow-type arrow-like triangle, like this?

an arrow with only two lines that intersect at the point. Like a greater than sign: >

10 Answers 10

up vote 90 down vote accepted

You can use the before or after pseudo-element and apply some CSS to it. There are various ways. You can add both before and after, and rotate and position each of them to form one of the bars. An easier solution is adding two borders to just the before element and rotate it using transform: rotate.

Scroll down for a different solution that uses an actual element instead of the pseuso elements

In this case, I've added the arrows as bullets in a list and used em sizes to make them size properly with the font of the list.

ul {
    list-style: none;
}

ul.big {
    list-style: none;
    font-size: 300%
}

li::before {
    position: relative;
    /* top: 3pt; Uncomment this to lower the icons as requested in comments*/
    content: "";
    display: inline-block;
    /* By using an em scale, the arrows will size with the font */
    width: 0.4em;
    height: 0.4em;
    border-right: 0.2em solid black;
    border-top: 0.2em solid black;
    transform: rotate(45deg);
    margin-right: 0.5em;
}

/* Change color */
li:hover {
  color: red; /* For the text */
}
li:hover::before {
  border-color: red; /* For the arrow (which is a border) */
}
<ul>
    <li>Item1</li>
    <li>Item2</li>
    <li>Item3</li>
    <li>Item4</li>
</ul>

<ul class="big">
    <li>Item1</li>
    <li>Item2</li>
    <li>Item3</li>
    <li>Item4</li>
</ul>

Of course you don't need to use before or after, you can apply the same trick to a normal element as well. For the list above it is convenient, because you don't need additional markup. But sometimes you may want (or need) the markup anyway. You can use a div or span for that, and I've even seen people even recycle the i element for 'icons'. So that markup could look like below. Whether using <i> for this is right is debatable, but you can use span for this as well to be on the safe side.

/* Default icon formatting */
i {
  display: inline-block;
  font-style: normal;
  position: relative;
}

/* Additional formatting for arrow icon */
i.arrow {
    /* top: 2pt; Uncomment this to lower the icons as requested in comments*/
    width: 0.4em;
    height: 0.4em;
    border-right: 0.2em solid black;
    border-top: 0.2em solid black;
    transform: rotate(45deg);
}
And so you can have an <i class="arrow" title="arrow icon"></i> in your text.
This arrow is <i class="arrow" title="arrow icon"></i> used to be deliberately lowered slightly on request.
I removed that for the general public <i class="arrow" title="arrow icon"></i> but you can uncomment the line with 'top' <i class="arrow" title="arrow icon"></i> to restore that effect.

If you seek more inspiration, make sure to check out this awesome library of pure CSS icons by Nicolas Gallagher. :)

  • This worked pretty well but there are a couple things that need modification. 1. How would I move the arrow down slightly without moving the rest of the text down with it? I tried #arrow::after and then setting a margin-top, but that moved everything down, including the text. 2. I need it to change color on mouseover. Right now, only the text changes color. How would I get both the text and the arrow to change? – Tommay Dec 17 '14 at 18:05
  • To change the color of the arrow, you will need to change the border-color, since the arrow is actuall not a character but a border. For positioning, you can add position: relative to the arrow and move it around using top and left. I've shown both in the modified first snippet, and the positioning as well in the second snippet. Note the nice combination li:hover::before which refers to the before pseudo-element of a hovered list item. – GolezTrol Dec 17 '14 at 18:31
  • Actually, one more thing: so I'm trying to center this text now (with the after element). The problem is that this after element is apparently taking up a lot of invisible space, and as a result the text appears to be extremely off-center. How would I set that invisible space to 0? I tried left: 0 and right: 0, along with margin-left: 0 and margin-right: 0, neither worked. – Tommay Dec 18 '14 at 3:02
  • I'm not exactly sure what you mean, but the pseudo-element already has a margin of 0 by itself, so you would need a negative margin to cancel out any whitespace. For instance in the second snippet, you could add margin-left: -0.4em; to put the arrow next to the previous word without any space. – GolezTrol Dec 18 '14 at 6:50
  • I posted a new question at stackoverflow.com/questions/27549099/… – Tommay Dec 18 '14 at 15:16

This can be solved much easier than the other suggestions.

Simply draw a square and apply a border property to just 2 joining sides.

Then rotate the square according to the direction you want the arrow to point, for exaple: transform: rotate(<your degree here>)

.triangle {
    border-right: 10px solid; 
    border-bottom: 10px solid;
    height: 30px;
    width: 30px;
    transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
<div class="triangle"></div>

  • 1
    nice and simple! – Karlth Apr 12 '16 at 16:50
  • 1
    Thanks @Karlth, shame it's not the accepted answer as it removes a lot of the complexitites – Alan Dunning Apr 13 '16 at 17:15
  • This is the perfect answer, it really needs to be the accepted one. Very simple, and every bit as effective. – Andrew Faulkner Aug 23 '16 at 3:14
  • @AndrewFaulkner Glad it helped. – Alan Dunning Aug 23 '16 at 21:46

Responsive arrows

they resize automatically with your text and are colored the same color. Plug and play :)
jsBin demo playground

enter image description here

body{
  font-size: 25px; /* Change font and  see the magic! */
  color: #f07;     /* Change color and see the magic! */
} 

/* RESPONSIVE ARROWS */
[class^=arr-]{
  border:       solid currentColor;
  border-width: 0 .2em .2em 0;
  display:      inline-block;
  padding:      .20em;
}
.arr-right {transform:rotate(-45deg);  -webkit-transform:rotate(-45deg);}
.arr-left  {transform:rotate(135deg);  -webkit-transform:rotate(135deg);}
.arr-up    {transform:rotate(-135deg); -webkit-transform:rotate(-135deg);}
.arr-down  {transform:rotate(45deg);   -webkit-transform:rotate(45deg);}
This is <i class="arr-right"></i> .arr-right<br>
This is <i class="arr-left"></i> .arr-left<br>
This is <i class="arr-up"></i> .arr-up<br>
This is <i class="arr-down"></i> .arr-down

  • 2
    That one works (here). – GolezTrol Dec 15 '14 at 20:46
  • 1
    Wow, that symbol is actually called "Top right corner"! Nice. :) Less control over the width than with a border, but still +1 for showing the possibility of fonts. For other symbols this might be better than a CSS shape trick. – GolezTrol Dec 15 '14 at 20:48
  • Note that font icons won't work well if the user doesn't have the font, so you must make sure to have proper fallbacks to fonts that are available to most systems. You might as well choose to download the font through CSS, but it's a waste of bandwidth to do that for a couple of icons. If you have many icons, though, or you want to have them in your own style, you might opt for adding all of them to your own icon font and loading that through CSS. That way you are (almost) certain of having the right font available without having to download huge fonts for a handful of symbols. – GolezTrol Dec 16 '14 at 16:16
  • Back in HTML 4.0 a total set was adopted holding 38887 characters. since v. 6.2.0 September 2012 1 Unicode UTF-8 characters set rise to 110182, and Now having HTML5 and the default UTF-8 and looks our character is looking good: unicode.org/Public/UNIDATA/UnicodeData.txt – Roko C. Buljan Dec 16 '14 at 16:34
  • The fact that the character exists doesn't mean it can be displayed. You'll need the proper font to show it. That's the reason why the characters in the first version of your answer failed: because the default font of my browser didn't include those characters. So to use a character like this, you will need to specify which fonts to use, and you must provide proper fallbacks to other fonts if they are not available on all platforms. For instance the \231d character might be available here, but not on a Mac or an Android device. HTML version and response encoding have nothing to do with it. – GolezTrol Dec 16 '14 at 16:41

Here's a different approach:

1) Use the multiplication character: &times; ×

2) Hide half of it with overflow:hidden

3) Then add a triangle as a pseudo element for the tip.

The advantage here is that no transforms are necessary. (It will work in IE8+)

FIDDLE

.arrow {
  position: relative;
}
.arrow:before {
  content: '×';
  display: inline-block;
  position: absolute;
  font-size: 240px;
  font-weight: bold;
  font-family: verdana;
  width: 103px;
  height: 151px;
  overflow: hidden;
  line-height: 117px;
}
.arrow:after {
  content: '';
  display: inline-block;
  position: absolute;
  left: 101px;
  top: 51px;
  width: 0;
  height: 0;
  border-style: solid;
  border-width: 25px 0 25px 24px;
  border-color: transparent transparent transparent black;
}
<div class="arrow"></div>

  • 2
    Works in Internet explorer, chrome and firefox. – Thomas Dec 16 '14 at 10:16
  • 1
    And also works in Safari. – nicael Dec 16 '14 at 14:46

Just use before and after Pseudo-elements - CSS

*{box-sizing: border-box; padding: 0; margin: 0}
:root{background: white; transition: background .3s ease-in-out}
:root:hover{background: red }
div{
  margin: 20px auto;
  width: 150px;
  height: 150px;
  position:relative
}

div:before, div:after{
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 75px;
  height: 20px;
  background: black;
  left: 40px
}

div:before{
  top: 45px;
  transform: rotateZ(45deg)
}

div:after{
  bottom: 45px;
  transform: rotateZ(-45deg)
}
<div/>

  • 2
    Produces = for me... – nicael Dec 16 '14 at 14:43

An other approach using borders and no CSS3 properties :

div, div:after{
    border-width: 80px 0 80px 80px;
    border-color: transparent transparent transparent #000;
    border-style:solid;
    position:relative;
}
div:after{
    content:'';
    position:absolute;
    left:-115px; top:-80px;
    border-left-color:#fff;
}
<div></div>

> itself is very wonderful arrow! Just prepend a div with it and style it.

div{
  font-size:50px;
}
div::before{
  content:">";
  font: 50px 'Consolas';
  font-weight:900;
}
<div class="arrowed">Hatz!</div>

  • 2
    Thats a "greater than" symbol, not an arrow. – Mark Knol Jan 11 '15 at 18:31
  • @MarkKnol What's the different between this and how everyone else's arrow looks? This seems to be the best solution yet to me. – dallin May 11 '17 at 7:50

Left Right Arrow with hover effect using Roko C. Buljan box-shadow trick

.arr {
  display: inline-block;
  padding: 1.2em;
  box-shadow: 8px 8px 0 2px #777 inset;
}
.arr.left {
  transform: rotate(-45deg);
}
.arr.right {
  transform: rotate(135deg);
}
.arr:hover {
  box-shadow: 8px 8px 0 2px #000 inset
}
<div class="arr left"></div>
<div class="arr right"></div>

I needed to change an input to an arrow in my project. Below is final work.

#in_submit {
  background-color: white;
  border-left: #B4C8E9;
  border-top: #B4C8E9;
  border-right: 3px solid black;
  border-bottom: 3px solid black;
  width: 15px;
  height: 15px;
  transform: rotate(-45deg);
  margin-top: 4px;
  margin-left: 4px;
  position: absolute;
  cursor: pointer;
}
<input id="in_submit" type="button" class="convert_btn">

Here Fiddle

  • Awesome code! It only uses one element which is difficult to do :) – www139 Dec 5 '15 at 1:08

.arrow {
  display : inline-block;
  font-size: 10px; /* adjust size */
  line-height: 1em; /* adjust vertical positioning */
  border: 3px solid #000000;
  border-left: transparent;
  border-bottom: transparent;
  width: 1em; /* use font-size to change overall size */
  height: 1em; /* use font-size to change overall size */
}

.arrow:before {
  content: "\00a0"; /* needed to hook line-height to "something" */
}

.arrow.left {
  margin-left: 0.5em;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(225deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(225deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(225deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(225deg);
  transform: rotate(225deg);
}

.arrow.right {
  margin-right: 0.5em;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(45deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(45deg);
  transform: rotate(45deg);
}

.arrow.top {
  line-height: 0.5em; /* use this to adjust vertical positioning */
  margin-left: 0.5em;
  margin-right: 0.5em;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(-45deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(-45deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(-45deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(-45deg);
  transform: rotate(-45deg);
}

.arrow.bottom {
  line-height: 2em;
  /* use this to adjust vertical positioning */
  margin-left: 0.5em;
  margin-right: 0.5em;
  -webkit-transform: rotate(135deg);
  -moz-transform: rotate(135deg);
  -o-transform: rotate(135deg);
  -ms-transform: rotate(135deg);
  transform: rotate(135deg);
}
<div>
  here are some arrows
  <div class='arrow left'></div> space
  <div class='arrow right'></div> space
  <div class='arrow top'></div> space
  <div class='arrow bottom'></div> space with proper spacing?
</div>

Similar to Roko C, but a little more control over size and placement.

protected by web-tiki Oct 27 '15 at 13:06

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