6

I need a function to atomically add float32 values in Go. This is what came up with based on some C code I found:

package atomic

import (
    "sync/atomic"
    "unsafe"
    "math"
)

func AddFloat32(addr *float32, delta float32) (new float32) {
    unsafeAddr := (*uint32)(unsafe.Pointer(addr))

    for {
        oldValue := math.Float32bits(*addr)
        new       = *addr + delta
        newValue := math.Float32bits(new)

        if atomic.CompareAndSwapUint32(unsafeAddr, oldValue, newValue) {
            return
        }
    }
}

Should it work (i.e really be atomic)? Is there a better/faster way to do it in Go?

4

Look for some code from the Go standard library to adapt. For example, from go/src/sync/atomic/64bit_arm.go,

func addUint64(val *uint64, delta uint64) (new uint64) {
    for {
        old := *val
        new = old + delta
        if CompareAndSwapUint64(val, old, new) {
            break
        }
    }
    return
}

For float32 that becomes,

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "math"
    "sync/atomic"
    "unsafe"
)

func AddFloat32(val *float32, delta float32) (new float32) {
    for {
        old := *val
        new = old + delta
        if atomic.CompareAndSwapUint32(
            (*uint32)(unsafe.Pointer(val)),
            math.Float32bits(old),
            math.Float32bits(new),
        ) {
            break
        }
    }
    return
}

func main() {
    val, delta := float32(math.Pi), float32(math.E)
    fmt.Println(val, delta, val+delta)
    new := AddFloat32(&val, delta)
    fmt.Println(val, new)
}

Output:

3.1415927 2.7182817 5.8598747
5.8598747 5.8598747
  • @JimB: When you say it may fail, do you mean that it depends on the target architecture? Is the quoted code from go/src/sync/atomic/64bit_arm.go only reliable on arm? – B_old Dec 16 '14 at 8:23
  • @B_old: sorry, I seem to have sufficiently confused the subject here. I agree that @peterSO's example is correct, and will properly update the float32 value. The comment I made was just about the race detector and how it could flag the unprotected read from *addr, though it doesn't currently. Ensuring that code passes under -race is often critical, and if this does flag it in the future, it's not hard to work around. (removed old comments, and they weren't really useful) – JimB Dec 16 '14 at 13:50

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