29

Take this example:

i = 0x12345678
print("{:08x}".format(i))
   # shows 12345678
i = swap32(i)
print("{:08x}".format(i))
   # should print 78563412

What would be the swap32-function()? Is there a way to byte-swap an int in python, ideally with built-in tools?

5
  • 4
    Alternatively, the array.byteswap() method if you first convert the number into a byte-array
    – aruisdante
    Dec 16, 2014 at 14:10
  • 3
    @aruisdante I found this question, but its title does not correspond to what is asked by the OP.... changed its title.
    – Patrick B.
    Dec 16, 2014 at 14:12
  • Your example is swapping the order of 4-bit chunks, not bytes. If you swapped the order of the four bytes, { 12 34 56 78 }, it would be { 78 56 34 12 }.
    – AaronF
    Feb 5, 2019 at 21:40
  • @AaronF what? Your "it would be" is exactly what I put in the comment.
    – Patrick B.
    Feb 7, 2019 at 13:02
  • My bad. I misread it has 87654321. Sorry about that. You're right.
    – AaronF
    Feb 7, 2019 at 18:10

4 Answers 4

34

One method is to use the struct module:

def swap32(i):
    return struct.unpack("<I", struct.pack(">I", i))[0]

First you pack your integer into a binary format using one endianness, then you unpack it using the other (it doesn't even matter which combination you use, since all you want to do is swap endianness).

5
  • What should be the result of swap32(12345678) ?
    – Shahriar
    Dec 16, 2014 at 14:35
  • Oh i get it. Thank you
    – Shahriar
    Dec 16, 2014 at 14:38
  • 1
    @AerofoilKite be careful, don't be confused by the print of {:08x}, it is omitting the 0x. 12345678 != 0x12345678
    – Patrick B.
    Dec 16, 2014 at 15:11
  • 3
    @Carsten, "i" format for functions pack and unpack means signed integer. As a result, value like 0x87654321 is not handled well with your definition. To treat values as unsigned, format "I" could be used: struct.unpack("<I", struct.pack(">I", i))[0] Mar 10, 2016 at 2:21
  • @ArtemZankovich Thank you! I forgot about that. I have updated my answer accordingly.
    – Carsten
    Mar 10, 2016 at 9:25
30

Big endian means the layout of a 32 bit int has the most significant byte first,

e.g. 0x12345678 has the memory layout

msb             lsb
+------------------+
| 12 | 34 | 56 | 78|
+------------------+

while on little endian, the memory layout is

lsb             msb
+------------------+
| 78 | 56 | 34 | 12|
+------------------+

So you can just convert between them with some bit masking and shifting:

def swap32(x):
    return (((x << 24) & 0xFF000000) |
            ((x <<  8) & 0x00FF0000) |
            ((x >>  8) & 0x0000FF00) |
            ((x >> 24) & 0x000000FF))
2
  • I will do like this, but it is not used a "built-in" functionality as I asked for. Which is why I accept the other answer.
    – Patrick B.
    Dec 17, 2014 at 8:56
  • 10
    Bitwise shift, OR, and AND are about as "built-in" as it gets. Feb 5, 2018 at 20:49
17

From python 3.2 you can define function swap32() as the following:

def swap32(x):
    return int.from_bytes(x.to_bytes(4, byteorder='little'), byteorder='big', signed=False)

It uses array of bytes to represent the value and reverses order of bytes by changing endianness during conversion back to integer.

1
  • 1
    Nice! Also can be easily modified for 64-bit integers. Oct 29, 2018 at 2:53
4

Maybe simpler use the socket library.

from socket import htonl

swapped = htonl (i)
print (hex(swapped))

that's it. this library also works in the other direction with ntohl

1
  • 1
    Err, this won't work on big-endian systems. That's the whole point of htonl. Dec 7, 2021 at 20:28

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