3

I have this code

func getMeGoodies<T>(String:goodieName, callback:(goodie:T) -> ()) {
   var goodie:T = //get it from the jug
   callback(goodie)
}

And somewhere I want to call this

self.getMeGoodies("chocolatechip", callback: { (goodie) -> () in
            println("eat the \(goodie)")
        })

I am getting an error at the string "chocolatechip" saying it can't convert (blah blah). I believe it is not able to figure it out what T is because it works when I return the goodie from the function and assign it to a variable when calling it (or simply do a casting)

var chocolateChip:Goodie =  self.getMeGoodies("chocolatechip", callback: { (goodie) -> () in
            println("eat the \(goodie)")
        }) 

or

self.getMeGoodies("chocolatechip", callback: { (goodie) -> () in
            println("eat the \(goodie)")
        }) as Goodie

Is there any way I can let swift know what type it is without the sorta hacky way of doing it.

  • I think your first working example and Martin R's answer are both good ways to go. Your example is probably even more readable, since the type information isn't embedded in the closure. – Nate Cook Dec 16 '14 at 15:47
4

If you add a type annotation to the closure parameter then the compiler can infer the generic type T:

self.getMeGoodies("chocolatechip", callback: { (goodie : Goodie) -> () in
    println("eat the \(goodie)")
})

Another method is to pass the type as an argument to the method:

func getMeGoodies<T>(type : T.Type, goodieName : String, callback:(goodie:T) -> ()) {
    var goodie:T = 0 //get it from the jug
    callback(goodie: goodie)
}

self.getMeGoodies(Goodie.self, goodieName: "chocolatechip", callback: { (goodie)  in
    println("eat the \(goodie)")
})
  • Duh! Thanks. Swift is for a sure a smarter cookie ;) – Saikiran Yerram Dec 16 '14 at 15:47

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