4

I have a class running some code before the init:

class NoFollowSpider(CrawlSpider):
    rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),),
                callback="parse_items",  follow= True),
)

def __init__(self, moreparams=None, *args, **kwargs):
    super(NoFollowSpider, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
    self.moreparams = moreparams

I am running this scrapy code with the following command:

> scrapy runspider my_spider.py -a moreparams="more parameters" -o output.txt 

Now, I want the static variable named rules to be configurable from the command-line:

> scrapy runspider my_spider.py -a crawl=True -a moreparams="more parameters" -o output.txt

changing the init to:

def __init__(self, crawl_pages=False, moreparams=None, *args, **kwargs):
    if (crawl_pages is True):
        self.rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),), callback="parse_items",  follow= True),
    )
    self.moreparams = moreparams

However, if I switch the static variable rules within the init, scrapy does not take it into account anymore: It runs, but only crawls the given start_urls and not the whole domain. It seems that rules must be a static class variable.

So, How can I dynamically set a static variable?

5
  • 1
    You can do that with meta classes, that take care of instantiation of the class itself, not its instances. Is that the direction you want? – Not_a_Golfer Dec 16 '14 at 16:40
  • 1
    Not sure what you are asking. Your code is not running before init, that is exactly init function that you pasted. Elaborate more. – bosnjak Dec 16 '14 at 16:49
  • @BartoszKP I clarified the question, let me know if it makes more sense now. – Antoine Brunel Dec 16 '14 at 18:04
  • @Not_a_Golfer Indeed, I think I need to go in that direction and I would appreciate any indication or resource. – Antoine Brunel Dec 16 '14 at 18:04
  • @antoinet Yes, looks way better, thanks! – BartoszKP Dec 16 '14 at 20:20
10

So here is how I resolved the problem with the great help of @Not_a_Golfer and @nramirezuy, I'm simply using a bit of both what they suggested:

class NoFollowSpider(CrawlSpider):

def __init__(self, crawl_pages=False, moreparams=None, *args, **kwargs):
    super(NoFollowSpider, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
    # Set the class member from here
    if (crawl_pages is True):
        NoFollowSpider.rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),), callback="parse_items",  follow= True),)
        # Then recompile the Rules
        super(NoFollowSpider, self)._compile_rules()

    # Keep going as before
    self.moreparams = moreparams

Thank you all for your help!

1
  • thanks. Although I am regretting over choosing python and scrappy. I wasted 2 hours on this. could have done it in Haskell pretty easily. – Praveen Singh Yadav Dec 13 '16 at 15:20
2

Well, you have two options. The simpler one - I'm not sure it will work but simply using the class instead of self in the constructor to set the rules:

def __init__(self, session_id=-1, crawl_pages=False, allowed_domains=None, start_urls=None, xpath=None, contains = None, doesnotcontain=None, *args, **kwargs):

    #You simply set the class member from here
    NoFollowSpider.rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),),
                callback="parse_items",  follow= True),)

I'm not sure if scrapy will respect that - it depends on when it reads those rules. But worth a try.

Another, more complicated method, is using meta classes. Basically, you can intervene in the way the class is created, not only its instances. Note that the metaclass' __new__ methods happens on import time, before any code is run.

class MyType(type):
    """
    A Meta class that creates classes 
    """
    @staticmethod
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dict):
        ret = type.__new__(cls, name, bases, dict)

        # whatever you want to do - do it here. You can peek into
        # the command line args for example
        ret.rules = (....)
        return ret


class MyClass(object):
    """
    Now comes the actual class, with the __metaclass__ identifier.
    This means that when we create the class definition we call the metaclass' __new__
    """ 
    __metaclass__ = MyType

    def __init__(self):
        pass
1
  • The first option does not work since -as stated in another answer- rules are compiled in the parent class when it's initialized. But you helped me a lot in finding the right answer! Thank you for that! – Antoine Brunel Dec 16 '14 at 21:48
1

Rules are being compiled before you define them.

1
  • Thank you for this answer, it helped to find my way through its resolution! – Antoine Brunel Dec 16 '14 at 21:49
1
class NoFollowSpider(CrawlSpider):
    def __init__(self, crawl_pages=False, moreparams=None, *a, **kw):
        if (crawl_pages is True):
            NoFollowSpider.rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),),
                                           callback="parse_items",  follow= True),)

        # No need to call "_compile_rules()" manually, it's called in __init__ of the parent
        super(NoFollowSpider, self).__init__(*a, **kw)

        # Keep going as before
        self.moreparams = moreparams
0

How can I dynamically set a static variable?

I don't know scrapy, but is there any reason you can't just use a class method?

class NoFollowSpider(CrawlSpider):
    rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),),\
            callback="parse_items",  follow= True),)
    @classmethod
    def set_rules(klass,rules)
        klass.rules = rules

Note that rules isn't a static variable, it's a class attribute.


EDIT - Here's an alternate way to potentially set it at the very beginning. Should allow you to avoid having to do _compile_rules(), and I think it's a lot cleaner:

class NoFollowSpider(CrawlSpider):
    def __new__(klass, crawl_pages=False, moreparams=None, *args, **kwargs):
        if crawl_pages:
            klass.rules = ( Rule (SgmlLinkExtractor(allow=("", ),),\
            callback="parse_items",  follow= True),)
        return super(NoFollowSpider,klass).__new__(klass,*args,**kwargs)
    def __init__(self, crawl_pages=False, moreparams=None, *args, **kwargs):
        super(NoFollowSpider, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.moreparams = moreparams
11
  • Well, it's because as @nramirezuy explained it in another answer, rules are being compiled by Scrapy when the parent class is initiated – Antoine Brunel Dec 16 '14 at 21:58
  • 1
    Sorry, giving you was just an awkward mistake :-( – Antoine Brunel Dec 18 '14 at 18:20
  • 1
    I don't want it if I don't deserve it! – Rick supports Monica Dec 18 '14 at 20:23
  • 1
    See my edited answer. This is how you are supposed to do this, I believe. – Rick supports Monica Dec 18 '14 at 20:34
  • Very interesting and yes cleaner. However that returns TypeError: new__() takes at least 1 argument (0 given) And I don't understand why since __new is called with *args and **kwargs... – Antoine Brunel Dec 19 '14 at 10:08
0

I'm doing this with Scrapy 1.0, and it works. Notice that you can only trust kwargs on the initial Spider instantiation.

    class LinuxFoundationSpider(CrawlSpider):
        year = None

        def __init__(self, category=None, *args, **kwargs):
           monthly_thread_xpath = 'date\.html'
        if kwargs.get('year'):
            LinuxFoundationSpider.year = kwargs['year']
        if LinuxFoundationSpider.year:
            monthly_thread_xpath = '%s.*?(\\/date\\.html)' % LinuxFoundationSpider.year

        LinuxFoundationSpider.rules = (
            Rule(LinkExtractor(allow=(monthly_thread_xpath,))),
            Rule(LinkExtractor(restrict_xpaths=('//ul[2]/li/a[1]',)),
                               callback='parse_entry', follow=False),
        )
    super(LinuxFoundationSpider, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
1
  • I think the trick here is that you are actually calling super on the parent at the every end of the method call. Doing so gives us the opportunity to setup variables beforehand. I did this and it works as expected. – Sam Texas Jul 19 '15 at 12:49

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