299

How do I tell if a decimal or double value is an integer?

For example:

decimal d = 5.0; // Would be true
decimal f = 5.5; // Would be false

or

double d = 5.0; // Would be true
double f = 5.5; // Would be false

The reason I would like to know this is so that I can determine programmatically if I want to output the value using .ToString("N0") or .ToString("N2"). If there is no decimal point value, then I don't want to show that.

1
  • Math.Floor(float.Parse(inputValue)) == float.Parse(inputValue) Dec 28, 2021 at 12:34

17 Answers 17

542

For floating point numbers, n % 1 == 0 is typically the way to check if there is anything past the decimal point.

public static void Main (string[] args)
{
    decimal d = 3.1M;
    Console.WriteLine((d % 1) == 0);
    d = 3.0M;
    Console.WriteLine((d % 1) == 0);
}

Output:

False
True

Update: As @Adrian Lopez mentioned below, comparison with a small value epsilon will discard floating-point computation mis-calculations. Since the question is about double values, below will be a more floating-point calculation proof answer:

Math.Abs(d % 1) <= (Double.Epsilon * 100)
14
  • 114
    That works when the number starts out as a whole number, but not necessarily when the number is the result of some floating-point computation. How about something like "(d % 1) < epsilon" where epsion is some small value? May 1, 2010 at 22:23
  • 11
    It's a shame that the best answer in this thread is a comment, rather than the accepted answer. Nice one Adrian. Nov 30, 2011 at 12:35
  • 14
    I also think Adrian's comment above is the best answer. To put his advice in formal C# code: if (Math.Abs(n % 1) < Double.Epsilon) {// Do something if n is integer}. Mar 9, 2015 at 20:12
  • 10
    Actually, as the question is stated, this answer is correct and the comments are wrong. The OP doesn't want to know whether a double is an integer for mathematical purposes, but rather how to display it. Only exact integer values should be displayed without a decimal point. Also, the comment about about mod not being useful with floating point and not working outside of .NET is not well informed. And (int)d is a disaster that will throw an exception for most double values.
    – Jim Balter
    Mar 30, 2016 at 0:14
  • 3
    double.Epsilon * 100 is also not suitable. A proper epsilon value needs to be scaled to the values being compared. The smallest possible change in a double is a fraction of the value, not a fixed amount. The value they chose for C# double.Epsilon is also particularly bad because they used a different concept than DBL_EPSILON in C that's been around for decades and is actually useful.
    – tukra
    May 2, 2018 at 15:26
58

There are any number of ways to do this. For example:

double d = 5.0;
bool isInt = d == (int)d;

You can also use modulo.

double d = 5.0;
bool isInt = d % 1 == 0;
11
  • Would one of these be faster than the other? I'm wanting to do this in a performance sensitive context.
    – Basil
    Dec 4, 2013 at 3:35
  • @Basil - Depends on the circumstances. You should do some timings for yourself and judge. Dec 4, 2013 at 22:09
  • 5
    Math.Abs(d-(int)d) < double.Epsilon is safer than d == (int)d
    – Reactgular
    Jan 31, 2014 at 15:38
  • 4
    @MathewFoscarini - I think you're confused. It sets it to false, because the result of 16.1 - 6.1 is not an int. The point was to find if a given value is an int, not if something that is approximately an int is an int. Jan 31, 2014 at 18:56
  • 2
    @MathewFoscarini - Yes, an int is a number without a decimal value (or a decimal value of 0). 16.1-6.1 does not create a 0 decimal value, it's a very small non-zero value that is caused by IEEE Floating Point format quirks. There is no way to know whether the number is SUPPOSED to have a decimal value or not, so assuming a rounding value is just as inaccurate. The purpose of the question was to know whether a floating point number was an integer, not whether it was approximately an integer. Jan 31, 2014 at 21:21
26

How about this?

public static bool IsInteger(double number) {
    return number == Math.Truncate(number);
}

Same code for decimal.

Mark Byers made a good point, actually: this may not be what you really want. If what you really care about is whether a number rounded to the nearest two decimal places is an integer, you could do this instead:

public static bool IsNearlyInteger(double number) {
    return Math.Round(number, 2) == Math.Round(number);
}
1
  • 1
    perhaps update your solution and add: && number<int.MaxValue && number>int.MinValue Aug 20, 2018 at 13:03
13
bool IsInteger(double num) {
    if (ceil(num) == num && floor(num) == num)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

Problemo solvo.

Edit: Pwned by Mark Rushakoff.

2
  • 4
    or just return ceil(num) == num && floor(num) == num; May 1, 2010 at 21:32
  • 21
    or just return ceil(num) == floor(num); Oct 21, 2013 at 1:43
13

Whilst the solutions proposed appear to work for simple examples, doing this in general is a bad idea. A number might not be exactly an integer but when you try to format it, it's close enough to an integer that you get 1.000000. This can happen if you do a calculation that in theory should give exactly 1, but in practice gives a number very close to but not exactly equal to one due to rounding errors.

Instead, format it first and if your string ends in a period followed by zeros then strip them. There are also some formats that you can use that strip trailing zeros automatically. This might be good enough for your purpose.

double d = 1.0002;
Console.WriteLine(d.ToString("0.##"));
d = 1.02;
Console.WriteLine(d.ToString("0.##"));

Output:

1
1.02
7
  • @Mark Sounds interesting. Do you have an example of a format that strips trailing zeros?
    – Jim Geurts
    May 1, 2010 at 21:47
  • I agree that it is safer and what the OP should probably do, but it is not an answer to the narrower (but more interesting) question of whether a value has a fractional part or not.
    – Clifford
    May 1, 2010 at 22:10
  • 3
    @Clifford: I usually try to answer based on what is best to solve the OPs problem, not based on what the title says. Titles are rarely an accurate description of the problem.
    – Mark Byers
    May 1, 2010 at 22:25
  • +1 Agree that trying to test floats or doubles to see if they could be ints is bad due to rounding and precision errors. May 2, 2010 at 1:42
  • 1
    For money usage, you would probably want 1.2 to be displayed as 1.20, which is not the case with the suggested solution. Any takers? Apr 29, 2014 at 14:15
6
static bool IsWholeNumber(double x) 
{
    return Math.Abs(x % 1) < double.Epsilon;
}
1
  • 2
    The answer will not work for double x = 0.31d + 0.27d - 0.58d; Dec 1, 2020 at 6:11
4

Mark Rushakoff's answer may be simpler, but the following also work and may be more efficient since there is no implicit division operation:

     bool isInteger = (double)((int)f) == f ;

and

     bool isInteger = (decimal)((int)d) == d ;

If you want a single expression for both types, perhaps

     bool isInteger = (double)((int)val) == (double)val ;
3

If upper and lower bound of Int32 matters:

public bool IsInt32(double value)
{
    return  value >= int.MinValue && value <= int.MaxValue && value == (int)value;
}
2
  • First test, then cast like this it would throw an exception other than return false, perhaps update your answer Aug 20, 2018 at 13:05
  • @computer, yes good point. Regarding throwing on cast, I guess it would depend on your project setting.
    – nawfal
    Aug 20, 2018 at 20:30
2

You can use String formatting for the double type. Here is an example:

double val = 58.6547;
String.Format("{0:0.##}", val);      
//Output: "58.65"

double val = 58.6;
String.Format("{0:0.##}", val);      
//Output: "58.6"

double val = 58.0;
String.Format("{0:0.##}", val);      
//Output: "58"

Let me know if this doesn't help.

2
  • 1
    That does not really address the question of determining if a value has no fractional part, which is a mathematical question. It is however probably what the OP needs given his explanatory note.
    – Clifford
    May 1, 2010 at 22:04
  • 2
    Yes, he want just to format double or decimal value without decimal point. Thank you... May 1, 2010 at 22:27
2
    public static bool isInteger(decimal n)
    {
        return n - (Int64)n == 0;
    }
1
0

I faced a similar situation, but where the value is a string. The user types in a value that's supposed to be a dollar amount, so I want to validate that it's numeric and has at most two decimal places.

Here's my code to return true if the string "s" represents a numeric with at most two decimal places, and false otherwise. It avoids any problems that would result from the imprecision of floating-point values.

try
{
    // must be numeric value
    double d = double.Parse(s);
    // max of two decimal places
    if (s.IndexOf(".") >= 0)
    {
        if (s.Length > s.IndexOf(".") + 3)
            return false;
    }
    return true;
catch
{
    return false;
}

I discuss this in more detail at http://progblog10.blogspot.com/2011/04/determining-whether-numeric-value-has.html.

1
  • 4
    This assumes that you're working with one culture. For example, It would not work properly with cultures that represent decimals like 1.000,00
    – Jim Geurts
    Apr 10, 2011 at 16:15
0

Using int.TryParse will yield these results:

        var shouldBeInt = 3;

        var shouldntBeInt = 3.1415;

        var iDontWantThisToBeInt = 3.000f;

        Console.WriteLine(int.TryParse(shouldBeInt.ToString(), out int parser)); // true

        Console.WriteLine(int.TryParse(shouldntBeInt.ToString(), out parser)); // false

        Console.WriteLine(int.TryParse(iDontWantThisToBeInt.ToString(), out parser)); // true, even if I don't want this to be int

        Console.WriteLine(int.TryParse("3.1415", out  parser)); // false

        Console.WriteLine(int.TryParse("3.0000", out parser)); // false

        Console.WriteLine(int.TryParse("3", out parser)); // true

        Console.ReadKey();
0

You can simply compare the double against the int cast of the same value.

double d = 5.0m;

if (d == (int)d)
{
.... 
}
0

This is my solution to this problem. Maybe someone will useful.

public static bool IsInt(object number, int? decimalPlaces = null)
{
    bool isInt;
    var splinted = number.ToString().Split(',');

    if (splinted.Length == 1)
        isInt = true;
    else
    {
        var charsAfterComma = decimalPlaces != null ? splinted[1].Substring(0, (int) decimalPlaces) : splinted[1];  
        isInt = charsAfterComma.First().ToString() == "0" && charsAfterComma.Replace("0", "") == "";
    }

    return isInt;
}
1
  • Have you considered other cultures because this would not work with cultures that uses , for decimal separator.
    – onatm
    Dec 19, 2022 at 10:05
-2

Try this:

number == Convert.ToInt16(number);
-4

Perhaps not the most elegant solution but it works if you are not too picky!

bool IsInteger(double num) {
    return !num.ToString("0.################").Contains(".");
}
1
  • 11
    This is a terrible solution
    – Ospho
    Mar 12, 2015 at 5:35

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