123

I imported the math library in my program, and I was trying to find the minimum of three numbers in the following way:

v1[j+1] = math.Min(v1[j]+1, math.Min(v0[j+1]+1, v0[j]+cost))

where v1 is declared as:

t := "stackoverflow"
v1 := make([]int, len(t)+1)

However, when I run my program I get the following error:

./levenshtein_distance.go:36: cannot use int(v0[j + 1] + 1) (type int) as type float64 in argument to math.Min

I thought it was weird because I have another program where I write

fmt.Println(math.Min(2,3))

and that program outputs 2 without complaining.

so I ended up casting the values as float64, so that math.Min could work:

v1[j+1] = math.Min(float64(v1[j]+1), math.Min(float64(v0[j+1]+1), float64(v0[j]+cost)))

With this approach, I got the following error:

./levenshtein_distance.go:36: cannot use math.Min(int(v1[j] + 1), math.Min(int(v0[j + 1] + 1), int(v0[j] + cost))) (type float64) as type int in assignment

so to get rid of the problem, I just casted the result back to int

I thought this was extremely inefficient and hard to read:

v1[j+1] = int(math.Min(float64(v1[j]+1), math.Min(float64(v0[j+1]+1), float64(v0[j]+cost))))

I also wrote a small minInt function, but I think this should be unnecessary because the other programs that make use of math.Min work just fine when taking integers, so I concluded this has to be a problem of my program and not the library per se.

Is there anything that I'm doing terrible wrong?

Here's a program that you can use to reproduce the issues above, line 36 specifically: package main

import (
    "math"
)

func main() {
    LevenshteinDistance("stackoverflow", "stackexchange")
}

func LevenshteinDistance(s string, t string) int {
    if s == t {
        return 0
    }
    if len(s) == 0 {
        return len(t)
    }
    if len(t) == 0 {
        return len(s)
    }

    v0 := make([]int, len(t)+1)
    v1 := make([]int, len(t)+1)

    for i := 0; i < len(v0); i++ {
        v0[i] = i
    }

    for i := 0; i < len(s); i++ {
        v1[0] = i + 1
        for j := 0; j < len(t); j++ {
            cost := 0
            if s[i] != t[j] {
                cost = 1
            }
            v1[j+1] = int(math.Min(float64(v1[j]+1), math.Min(float64(v0[j+1]+1), float64(v0[j]+cost))))
        }

        for j := 0; j < len(v0); j++ {
            v0[j] = v1[j]
        }
    }
    return v1[len(t)]
}
1

10 Answers 10

147

Starting with Go 1.21, min and max are available as builtins and you do not need to write them at all. (Thanks @ufukty for highlighting this in a comment.)

I'm leaving the previous content below in case someone needs a different simple generic function that isn't built in or can otherwise use the historical answers.


Until Go 1.18 a one-off function was the standard way; for example, the stdlib's sort.go does it near the top of the file:

func min(a, b int) int {
    if a < b {
        return a
    }
    return b
}

You might still want or need to use this approach so your code works on Go versions below 1.18!

Starting with Go 1.18, you can write a generic min function which is just as efficient at run time as the hand-coded single-type version, but works with any type with < and > operators:

func min[T constraints.Ordered](a, b T) T {
    if a < b {
        return a
    }
    return b
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(min(1, 2))
    fmt.Println(min(1.5, 2.5))
    fmt.Println(min("Hello", "世界"))
}

There's been discussion of updating the stdlib to add generic versions of existing functions, but if that happens it won't be until a later version.

math.Min(2, 3) happened to work because numeric constants in Go are untyped. Beware of treating float64s as a universal number type in general, though, since integers above 2^53 will get rounded if converted to float64.

9
  • 4
    And if you are often taking the min of more than 2 numbers, you can make a vararg version of min which simplifies the code that calls it: example: play.golang.org/p/v93gvbBEmT Dec 17, 2014 at 1:12
  • 327
    writing something like that IS unusual in most other languages. Hence the question I guess, at least that's how I ended up here. It is not that I can not write min function, it is that I can not believe it is not already there...
    – Slava
    Jun 15, 2017 at 11:59
  • 1
    Since golang does not contain polymorphism. You should name your function minInt or something simillar so that you can later create a function like this for other data types besides ints.
    – eshalev
    Nov 28, 2017 at 8:52
  • 1
    @eshalev This func min is private to a package (so only used within a small chunk of code), the package sort authors knew they really just wanted the smaller of two indices (not floats etc.), and trying to pass a float variable wouldn't work anyway since there are no C-like implicit conversions, so I think min was justifiable here. Of course, there are other places where you may want to write implementations for different types and funcs are public so the potential scope of use is wider, so type-specific names can make sense, like sort.Ints vs. sort.Strings.
    – twotwotwo
    Nov 28, 2017 at 18:45
  • 2
    would it be code bloat to need to write simple functions like this? Furthermore in general, any extra code, no matter how simple, can introduce errors (perhaps low level ones). It would be nice to use something that is official, as we can be more sure of it's implementation.
    – PathToLife
    Nov 13, 2021 at 10:28
23

There is no built-in min or max function for integers, but it’s simple to write your own. Thanks to support for variadic functions we can even compare more integers with just one call:

func MinOf(vars ...int) int {
    min := vars[0]

    for _, i := range vars {
        if min > i {
            min = i
        }
    }

    return min
}

Usage:

MinOf(3, 9, 6, 2)

Similarly here is the max function:

func MaxOf(vars ...int) int {
    max := vars[0]

    for _, i := range vars {
        if max < i {
            max = i
        }
    }

    return max
}
14

Following issue 59488, Go 1.21 (Q3 2023) will include, as shown by CL 498495 two new builtin commands:

// The max built-in function returns the largest value of a fixed number of
// arguments of [cmp.Ordered] types. There must be at least one argument.
func max[T cmp.Ordered](x T, y ...T) T
// The min built-in function returns the smallest value of a fixed number of
// arguments of [cmp.Ordered] types. There must be at least one argument.
func min[T cmp.Ordered](x T, y ...T) T

As documented here:

Min and max

The built-in functions min and max compute the smallest—or largest, respectively—value of a fixed number of arguments of ordered types.
There must be at least one argument.

The same type rules as for operators apply:

  • for ordered arguments x and y, min(x, y) is valid if x + y is valid, and the type of min(x, y) is the type of x + y (and similarly for max).
  • If all arguments are constant, the result is constant.
var x, y int
m := min(x)                 // m == x
m := min(x, y)              // m is the smaller of x and y
m := max(x, y, 10)          // m is the larger of x and y but at least 10
c := max(1, 2.0, 10)        // c == 10.0 (floating-point kind)
f := max(0, float32(x))     // type of f is float32
var s []string
_ = min(s...)               // invalid: slice arguments are not permitted
t := max("", "foo", "bar")  // t == "foo" (string kind)

For numeric arguments, min and max are commutative and associative:

min(x, y)    == min(y, x)
min(x, y, z) == min(min(x, y), z) == min(x, min(y, z))
5

For example,

package main

import "fmt"

func min(x, y int) int {
    if x < y {
        return x
    }
    return y
}

func main() {
    t := "stackoverflow"
    v0 := make([]int, len(t)+1)
    v1 := make([]int, len(t)+1)
    cost := 1
    j := 0

    v1[j+1] = min(v1[j]+1, min(v0[j+1]+1, v0[j]+cost))

    fmt.Println(v1[j+1])
}

Output:

1
2
  • 99
    golang makes you rewrite the wheel each time you need min for an other type that float64 ?
    – Pierrot
    Nov 3, 2017 at 11:42
  • 38
    That's when declared 'simplicity' causes real complexity.
    – XZen
    Nov 26, 2018 at 11:09
3

As the accepted answer states, with the introduction of generics in go 1.18 it's now possible to write a generic function that provides min/max for different numeric types (there is not one built into the language). And with variadic arguments we can support comparing 2 elements or a longer list of elements.

func Min[T constraints.Ordered](args ...T) T {
    min := args[0]
    for _, x := range args {
        if x < min {
            min = x
        }
    }
    return min
}

func Max[T constraints.Ordered](args ...T) T {
    max := args[0]
    for _, x := range args {
        if x > max {
            max = x
        }
    }
    return max
}

example calls:

Max(1, 2) // 2
Max(4, 5, 3, 1, 2) // 5
3
  • Please don't post the same answer to multiple questions, tailor your answer to match the question. If the questions are duplicates, flag one of them for closure as such.
    – miken32
    Aug 11, 2022 at 20:16
  • I thought this was a great answer until I realized that constraints isn't a thing. May 21, 2023 at 23:40
3

This is a very common question, and seems like all of the answers are out of date. Ever since Go 1.21, there's now a built-in min function (along with max). If you're using Go 1.21+, use it instead of the older work-arounds.

min does not need to be imported, supports as many arguments (variadic function) and can take integers, floats or strings.

n := min(1, -4, 2)
fmt.Println(m)
// -4
1
  • 2
    Yes, I mentioned it a month ago.
    – VonC
    Jun 30, 2023 at 16:13
3

Starting with go 1.21.0, min and max are builtins.

https://go.dev/ref/spec#Min_and_max
https://pkg.go.dev/builtin#min

For slices, you have to use: https://pkg.go.dev/slices#Min

package main
import (
    "fmt"
    "slices"
)
func main() {
    fmt.Println(min(42, 23))

    interestingNumbers := []int{42, 23}
    // Note that below does not work
    // https://github.com/golang/go/issues/59488#issuecomment-1500964628
    // fmt.Println(min(interestingNumbers...))
    // invalid operation: invalid use of ... with built-in min

    // For slices, use Slices.Min
    fmt.Println(slices.Min(interestingNumbers))
}

https://go.dev/play/p/U75fEwuRWIk

2

Though the question is quite old, maybe my package imath can be helpful for someone who does not like reinventing a bicycle. There are few functions, finding minimal of two integers: ix.Min (for int), i8.Min (for int8), ux.Min (for uint) and so on. The package can be obtained with go get, imported in your project by URL and functions referred as typeabbreviation.FuncName, for example:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "<Full URL>/go-imath/ix"
)

func main() {
    a, b := 45, -42
    fmt.Println(ix.Min(a, b)) // Output: -42
}
-1

Could use https://github.com/pkg/math:

import (
    "fmt"
    "github.com/pkg/math"
)

func main() {
    a, b := 45, -42
    fmt.Println(math.Min(a, b)) // Output: -42
}
2
  • 6
    reflect.TypeOf will show you that 45 and 42 are not int here. Aug 19, 2021 at 16:50
  • Not maintained :( Feb 17, 2022 at 19:26
-1

If you want the minimum of a set of N integers you can use (assuming N > 0):

import "sort"

func min(set []int) int {
    sort.Slice(set, func(i, j int) bool {
        return set[i] < set[j]
    })

    return set[0]
}

Where the second argument to min function is your less function, that is, the function that decides when an element i of the passed slice is less than an element j

Check it out here in Go Playground: https://go.dev/play/p/lyQYlkwKrsA

1
  • 1
    Maybe helpful, but this does not answer the question about min of two integers. Plus, this is very inefficient as it implies doing a sort, which has n * log n complexity, whereas searching for a min can definitely be done in linear time. Jan 20, 2022 at 12:10

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