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Whats the difference between this 2? why one works and the other does not?

array.each{ |item| puts "The item is #{item}" puts item + 1 }

array.each do |item|
  puts "The item is #{item}"
  puts item + 1
end
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  • 3
    Because you're missing a semicolon / newline on the first one between the puts statements? – tckmn Dec 17 '14 at 3:29
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When you have two statements in a single line, you need to put a ; between the two. Thus: puts "The item is #{item}"; puts item + 1.

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You're trying to cram two expressions where only one is expected. You can separate the two expressions using a semicolon:

array.each { |item| puts "The item is #{item}"; puts item + 1 }

Why not just supply both "The item is #{item}" and item + 1 to puts?

array.each { |item| puts "The item is #{item}", item + 1 }
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array.each{ |item| puts "The item is #{item}" puts item + 1 }

This is simply a syntax error, as mentioned by your interpreter:

syntax error, unexpected tIDENTIFIER, expecting '}'

Your second example is syntactically correct and so does not raise an error.

array.each do |item|
  puts "The item is #{item}"
  puts item + 1
end

You are missing a space after the each method call, before the first { which is perhaps at best a bad habit.

Also, you can have your first example as:

array.each {|item| puts "The item is #{item}"
  puts item + 1 }

And it would become syntactically correct, because of the new line. Nothing says that the curly brace form of a block given to each has to be written on one line, though it is one common convention.

For style, though, (and this is not Code Review, I know), I would probably try to keep the code consistent.

array.each do |item|
  puts "The item is #{item}\n#{item.next}"
end

Or perhaps with the curly braces:

array.each do { |item| puts "The item is #{item}\n#{item.next}" }

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