2

I have two MySQL tables, both contain DATETIME fields:

  1. table beginnings contains times at which a certain process was set in motion
  2. table events contains times at which certain events were caused by that process

The beginning is in the evening; the events happen on the following morning. Please note that each beginning is followed by a changing number of multiple events!

Here are two sample tables:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `beginnings` (
  `bid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `begin` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`bid`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=4 ;

INSERT INTO `beginnings` (`bid`, `begin`) VALUES
(1, '2014-09-24 22:44:00'),
(2, '2014-09-25 21:32:00'),
(3, '2014-09-28 22:01:00');

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `events` (
  `eid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `event` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`eid`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM  DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 AUTO_INCREMENT=10 ;

INSERT INTO `events` (`eid`, `event`) VALUES
(1, '2014-09-25 02:07:00'),
(2, '2014-09-25 04:06:00'),
(3, '2014-09-25 05:50:00'),
(4, '2014-09-26 02:07:00'),
(5, '2014-09-26 04:15:00'),
(7, '2014-09-29 01:08:00'),
(8, '2014-09-29 04:21:00'),
(6, '2014-09-29 05:02:00'),
(9, '2014-09-29 05:25:00');

I want to calculate the time differences (in minutes) between each event and the respective beginning.

Currently I'm pulling the data from the database, transforming the datetime entries to timestamps, and calculating the differences in PHP. Here is a simplified sample code with made up numbers, for easy reading:

$events = range(1, 50);
$beginnings = array(7, 11, 19, 27, 29, 36, 40, 43);
$events = array_merge(array_diff($events, $beginnings));

$differences = array();
for($i = 0; $i < count($beginnings); $i++) {
    foreach($events as $event) {
        if($event > $beginnings[$i] && $event < $beginnings[$i + 1]) {
            $differences[] = $event - $beginnings[$i];
        }
    }
}

My question:

Is it possible to calculate these differences in MySQL during the query?


Illustrative example:

You are the boss of a car factory. Each evening, before you go to sleep, you tell the teams in the night shift to each build one car and to take note of when they complete it. When you come back in the morning, you want to calculate how long it took the different teams to build their respective cars. You see that one team finished their car in two hours, while another team needed five hours to finish their car. You are curious, so you keep noting the times for a year and then do some statistics.

  • How events table is related to beginnings table ? – Abhik Chakraborty Dec 17 '14 at 10:13
  • @AbhikChakraborty I'm not sure I understand your question. Each event (a time in the early morning) follows from one beginning (a time on the preceding evening). Each beginning can cause multiple events, so several events share one beginning. Hope that makes sense. – user1322720 Dec 17 '14 at 10:18
  • Why is beginnings a separate table? Surely a 'beginning' is just the first event in a chain of events? – Strawberry Dec 17 '14 at 10:34
  • @Strawberry Yes, beginnings and events could all be listed in the same table, with a column identifying which datetimes are which. If such a database design helps achieving my goal, please explain how. – user1322720 Dec 17 '14 at 10:52
0

Well, if it was me, I'd probably do something like this...

DROP TABLE project_events;

CREATE TABLE project_events
(project_id INT NOT NULL
,event_date DATETIME NOT NULL
);

INSERT INTO project_events VALUES
(1, '2014-09-24 22:44:00'),
(1, '2014-09-25 02:07:00'),
(1, '2014-09-25 04:06:00'),
(1, '2014-09-25 05:50:00'),

(2, '2014-09-25 21:32:00'),
(2, '2014-09-26 02:07:00'),
(2, '2014-09-26 04:15:00'),

(3, '2014-09-28 22:01:00'),
(3, '2014-09-29 01:08:00'),
(3, '2014-09-29 04:21:00'),
(3, '2014-09-29 05:02:00'),
(3, '2014-09-29 05:25:00');

SELECT project_id
     , MIN(event_date) start
     , MAX(event_date) end
     , TIMEDIFF(MAX(event_date)
     , MIN(event_date)) duration 
  FROM project_events 
 GROUP 
    BY project_id;
+------------+---------------------+---------------------+----------+
| project_id | start               | end                 | duration |
+------------+---------------------+---------------------+----------+
|          1 | 2014-09-24 22:44:00 | 2014-09-25 05:50:00 | 07:06:00 |
|          2 | 2014-09-25 21:32:00 | 2014-09-26 04:15:00 | 06:43:00 |
|          3 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 2014-09-29 05:25:00 | 07:24:00 |
+------------+---------------------+---------------------+----------+

This schema allows for the possibility that projects over-run, or overlap. You may have valid reasons for wanting to store the 'beginnings' in a separate table - but it would be trivial to adapt this solution to take account of that. It simply involves a join on project_id.

Edit: Here's one way to compare a start date with all subsequent dates for that project:

SELECT x.project_id
     , MIN(y.event_date) start
     , x.event_date end
     , TIMEDIFF(x.event_date,MIN(y.event_date)) duration 
  FROM project_events x 
  JOIN project_events y 
    ON y.project_id = x.project_id 
 GROUP 
    BY x.project_id,x.event_date;
+------------+---------------------+---------------------+----------+
| project_id | start               | end                 | duration |
+------------+---------------------+---------------------+----------+
|          1 | 2014-09-24 22:44:00 | 2014-09-24 22:44:00 | 00:00:00 |
|          1 | 2014-09-24 22:44:00 | 2014-09-25 02:07:00 | 03:23:00 |
|          1 | 2014-09-24 22:44:00 | 2014-09-25 04:06:00 | 05:22:00 |
|          1 | 2014-09-24 22:44:00 | 2014-09-25 05:50:00 | 07:06:00 |
|          2 | 2014-09-25 21:32:00 | 2014-09-25 21:32:00 | 00:00:00 |
|          2 | 2014-09-25 21:32:00 | 2014-09-26 02:07:00 | 04:35:00 |
|          2 | 2014-09-25 21:32:00 | 2014-09-26 04:15:00 | 06:43:00 |
|          3 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 00:00:00 |
|          3 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 2014-09-29 01:08:00 | 03:07:00 |
|          3 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 2014-09-29 04:21:00 | 06:20:00 |
|          3 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 2014-09-29 05:02:00 | 07:01:00 |
|          3 | 2014-09-28 22:01:00 | 2014-09-29 05:25:00 | 07:24:00 |
+------------+---------------------+---------------------+----------+
| improve this answer | |
0

You can use the functions datediff or timediff.

SELECT DATEDIFF('2010-11-30 23:59:59','2010-12-31');
    -> -31

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_datediff

SELECT TIMEDIFF('2008-12-31 23:59:59.000001', '2008-12-30 01:01:01.000002');
    -> '46:58:57.999999'

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_timediff


You can also convert both DateTime values to integers (Number of seconds since Unix epoch) and substract them like normal numbers.

SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2007-11-30 10:30:19');
    -> 1196440219

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_unix-timestamp


A sample in response to the comments below. You should however read on SELECT, JOIN and WHERE statements. This is simple MySQL and should be understood before using more complex functions. See http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/select.html

SELECT TIMEDIFF(events.event, beginnings.begin)
FROM event
INNER JOIN beginnings ON beginnings.eid = events.eid

NOTE This select will not work according to your table structure as the beginnings table is missing a relation id to events. I used eid here. You need to find out how those two tables relate to each other before using that select and adjust it accordingly. Can't hep you here as I can see how your tables relate atm. Your old code did the relations hard-coded in PHP meaning you CAN NOT do this select in MySQL.

| improve this answer | |
  • I understand. What I don't understand is how I can let MySQL know that I want the differences calculated for specific times from tables of many times. – user1322720 Dec 17 '14 at 10:11
  • You can of course use column names from a SELECT column FROM table statement in your function instead of the fixed strings in the samples. – ToBe Dec 17 '14 at 10:12
  • You mean something like SELECT DATEDIFF(event FROM events WHERE event > begin AND event < DATE(DATE_ADD(begin, INTERVAL +1 DAY)), begin FROM beginning);? – user1322720 Dec 17 '14 at 10:17
  • No. Just do a simple SELECT with a JOIN. I'll try something and add it to the answer – ToBe Dec 17 '14 at 11:35
  • I see. Fantastic. Thank you. I'll try that. – user1322720 Dec 17 '14 at 11:52

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy