2

As stated in the title, I'm looking for a clear explanation regarding the differences between mixin and extend in LESS.

Code examples & live demo (i.e. on codepen.io) are more than welcome.

closed as too broad by seven-phases-max, Harry, mikedidthis, SW4, FelipeAls Dec 17 '14 at 16:20

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  • 1
    I'm afraid it's a too broad question for the SO. Start with lesscss.org/features. In short: extend simply appends current selector to a list of selectors it "extends" while mixin expands its contents into the ruleset you invoke it within. So in summary, when it comes to simple inheritance of static set of CSS properties the extend is more effective (since it produces more compact result) while mixins are more generic programming language facility being able to do anything extend can't (since mixin's content is not limited to static CSS properties). – seven-phases-max Dec 17 '14 at 11:01
  • Seems a bit broad to me mate. Fundamentally mixins and extend is different. In Less any CSS class by itself is a mixin and when you invoke a mixin within another class, it applies the same properties but would not combine selectors. Extend would combine the selectors. – Harry Dec 17 '14 at 11:02
  • Just when I wrote a huge answer, the question had to be closed. sigh – Achrome Dec 17 '14 at 11:12
  • @seven-phases-max & Harry: yeah, fair enough. After doing some further reading on LESS official documentation, seems like it's a rather broad question. I always like stackoverflow "in a nutshell" answer & "explanation by live examples" answers though. – Adrien Be Dec 17 '14 at 11:26
5

Before the differences, it is important to delve into what mixins and extend are

Mixins

Mixins are common rule-sets you define and can use them in any other rule-sets, eg.

.highlighted-text {
  color: #CCCCCC;
}
.normal-text:hover {
  .highlighted-text;
  font-size: 14px;
}
.another-text {
  .highlighed-text;
}

This will compile to

.highlight-text {
  color: #CCCCCC;
}
.normal-text:hover {
  color: #CCCCCC;
  font-size: 14px;
}
.another-text {
  color: #CCCCCC;
}

What we just did was mixing in of the rule-set we defined as .highlighted-text into any other rule-sets we deemed fit.

Mixins end up being very strong in that you can define one common rule-set, say .bordered, and mix it into all elements you want bordered. These help you in keeping your code DRY, and to change the styling of bordered elements across your page(s), you just need to change it at one place.

Another defining feature of mixins is that you can use multiple mixins in the same rule-set.

.bordered {
  border: 1px solid black;
}
.rounded {
  border-radius: 5px;
}
.bordered-and-rounded {
  .bordered;
  .rounded;
}

This feature basically allows your code to be as flexible as you will make it. Define a bunch of mixins and combine them to get the UI/UX you want.

Finally, mixins can be defined as functions with parameters as well, so you can have something like

.translucent(@opacity) {
  opacity: @opacity;
}
.medium-translucence {
  .translucent(0.5);
}
.high-translucence {
  .translucent(0.25);
}

Extend

Extend works in a very similar way as OOP works. You define a parent rule-set and you establish a chain of inheritance to inherit the same style. Consider this example

.black-text {
  color: #000000;
}
.title {
  &:extend(.black-text);
  font-size: 24px;
}

You have just 'extended' the behaviour of .black-text by inheriting the rule-set into title and adding a rule of your own.

The result CSS will be:

.title {
  font-size: 24px;
}
.black-text,
.title {
  color: #000000;
}

TL;DR - Differences between Extend and Mixin

Mixins allow you to write code in a more generic way, wherein you can include standard coding constructs, such as branching and looping to generate CSS more flexibly. This is possible since mixins allow for parameters and behave as functions when they do.

Extend allows you to inherit a set of static properties from one rule-set to another and you can augment the inherited rule-set with rules of your own.

Note - This answer is by no means the most comprehensive one in terms of usage, since the concept of mixins and extend is fairly broad. The best place to learn about the usage is the LESS docs.

  • I just added what I think will be the result of the compiled extend example you mentioned. I will read up & experiment more in the next few days before deciding to accept your answer as for now my knowledge is quite reduced. – Adrien Be Dec 17 '14 at 11:33
  • I've corrected the CSS output for extend. While what you deduced was correct for this case, but that wasn't what would be generated and moreover, for some cases, it would actually be wrong. – Achrome Dec 17 '14 at 11:42
  • Really? thought it was exactly the same as the first example in lesscss.org/features/#extend-feature – Adrien Be Dec 17 '14 at 11:43
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    Oh, you are right ofcourse. The order of the selectors in your case was incorrect, which is why I 'corrected' it in the first place. Order in CSS does matter, so you need to ensure the correct one. Will change it in the answer. – Achrome Dec 17 '14 at 11:51

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