5

Consider the following Linq to Entities query:

return (from lead in db.Leads
    join postcodeEnProvincie in postcodeEnProvincies
    on lead.Postcode equals postcodeEnProvincie.Postcode
    where (lead.CreationDate >= range.StartDate) && (lead.CreationDate <= range.EndDate)
    group lead by postcodeEnProvincie.Provincie into g
    select new Web.Models.GroupedLeads() {
        GroupName = g.Key,
        HotLeads = g.Count(l => l.Type == Data.LeadType.Hot),
        Leads = g.Count(),
        PriorityLeads = g.Count(l => l.Type == Data.LeadType.Priority),
        Sales = g.Count(l => l.Sold),
        ProductA = g.Count(l => l.Producten.Any(a => ((a.Name.Equals("productA", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)) || (a.Parent.Name.Equals("productA", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))))),
        ProductB = g.Count(l => l.Producten.Any(a => ((a.Name.Equals("productB", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)) || (a.Parent.Name.Equals("productB", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))))),
        ProductC = g.Count(l => l.Producten.Any(a => ((a.Name.Equals("productC", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)) || (a.Parent.Name.Equals("productC", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))))),
        ProductC = g.Count(l => l.Producten.Any(a => ((a.Name.Equals("productD", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)) || (a.Parent.Name.Equals("productD", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)))))
}).ToList();

If you're anything like me, your toes curl at the repetition of the product selection logic. This pattern is repeated in another place as well. I first attempted to replace it by an extension method on IEnumerable, which of course does not work: Linq to Entities needs an Expression to parse and translate.
So I created this method:

    public static System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<Func<Data.Lead, bool>> ContainingProductEx(string productName)
    {
        var ignoreCase = StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase;

        return (Data.Lead lead) =>
            lead.Producten.Any(
                (product =>
                    product.Name.Equals(productName, ignoreCase) ||
                    product.Parent.Name.Equals(productName, ignoreCase)
                ));
    }

The following selection now works perfectly fine:

var test = db.Leads.Where(Extensions.ContainingProductEx("productA")).ToList();

However, this won't compile, because IGrouping does not contain an override of Where that accepts an Expression:

return (from lead in db.Leads
        join postcodeEnProvincie in postcodeEnProvincies
        on lead.Postcode equals postcodeEnProvincie.Postcode
        where (lead.CreationDate >= range.StartDate) && (lead.CreationDate <= range.EndDate)
        group lead by postcodeEnProvincie.Provincie into g
        select new Web.Models.GroupedLeads()
        {
            GroupName = g.Key,
            HotLeads = g
                .Where(l => l.Type == Data.LeadType.Hot)
                .Count(),
            Leads = g.Count(),
            PriorityLeads = g
                .Where(l => l.Type == Data.LeadType.Priority)
                .Count(),
            Sales = g
                .Where(l => l.Sold)
                .Count(),
            ProductA = g
                .Where(Extensions.ContainingProductEx("productA"))
                .Count(),
            ProductB = g
                .Where(Extensions.ContainingProductEx("productB"))
                .Count(),
            ProductC = g
                .Where(Extensions.ContainingProductEx("productC"))
                .Count(),
            ProductD = g
                .Where(Extensions.ContainingProductEx("productD"))
                .Count()
        }).ToList();

Casting g to IQueryable compiles, but then yields a "Internal .NET Framework Data Provider error 1025.".

Is there any way to wrap this logic in its own method?

  • Linq to EF is an abstraction over SQL. If you can't write what you want in SQL it doesn't matter what EF does. Actually, it's far simpler to write complex queries in SQL (eg using views and UDFs) than trying to approximate the same in LINQ. For example, how many queries are executed for what you think is a single LINQ query? Use SQL Profiler to see what's going on. BTW, A Where() after a Group is the equivalent of HAVING in T-SQL. Only aggregates are allowed in the HAVING clause – Panagiotis Kanavos Dec 17 '14 at 13:46
  • 1
    The initial Linq query expression compiles just fine to SQL. My later attempts are only trying to not repeat the same expressions over and over. The problem exists in the abstraction alone, not in what it abstracts. – Menno van den Heuvel Dec 17 '14 at 13:59
  • The original may compile but it will be complex and very slow SQL. Anyway, the problem is the leaky abstraction. EF will translate the entire expression tree to SQL, so your method results in a different Expression tree from the original and that confuses EF. BTW string comparisons in SQL are not case-sensitive so you should remove the calls to String.Equals - they make the code hard to read and mislead the user into thinking that they have some effect. Moreover, where does Parent come from? The way it appears inside Any, you may be forcing additional queries inside your aggregates. – Panagiotis Kanavos Dec 17 '14 at 14:15
  • Casting to IQueryable, can you get the 1025 error to go away if you take your Extension method calls out of your Where clauses and assign them to variables before the query? – moarboilerplate Dec 17 '14 at 20:32
  • @moarboilerplate : that works. Write it up as an answer and I'll accept. – Menno van den Heuvel Dec 18 '14 at 8:42
2

This is a problem that can be solved using LINQKit. It allows expressions to be invoked from within other expressions, and it will inline the invoked expression within its caller. Sadly, it only supports a handful of very specific situations, so we'll need to adapt your expression generating method a bit.

Rather than passing the product name to the expression generating method, we'll have it be a parameter of the returned expression:

public static Expression<Func<Data.Lead, string, bool>> ContainingProductEx()
{
    var ignoreCase = StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase;

    return (lead, productName) =>
        lead.Producten.Any(
            (product =>
                product.Name.Equals(productName, ignoreCase) ||
                product.Parent.Name.Equals(productName, ignoreCase)
            ));
}

Next we'll need to call the method before declaring the query:

var predicate = Extensions.ContainingProductEx();

Your query can can now be written as:

from lead in db.Leads.AsExpandable()
//...
    ProductA = g
        .Where(lead => predicate.Invoke(lead, "productA"))
        .Count(),
    ProductB = g
        .Where(lead => predicate.Invoke(lead, "productB"))
        .Count(),
    ProductC = g
        .Where(lead => predicate.Invoke(lead, "productC"))
        .Count(),
    ProductD = g
        .Where(lead => predicate.Invoke(lead, "productD"))
        .Count()
-1

Instead of worrying about creating a function pointer/expression inside your query that you can reference (may not be possible), why not just create a separate private method that takes an IEnumerable<Lead>, a string, and returns an int and reference the method group in your query? I think your confusion is stemming from trying to create an extension method on the collection instead of creating a method that in the collection and the value you are looking for.

Something like:

ProductA = GetLeadsForProduct(g, "productA")

private int GetLeadsForProduct(IEnumerable<Lead> leads, string productType)
{
    return leads.Count(l => l.Producten.Any(a => ((a.Name.Equals(productType, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)) || (a.Parent.Name.Equals(productType, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)))))
}
  • This cannot be translated into SQL by the query provider, resulting in it throwing an exception. – Servy Dec 17 '14 at 16:57
  • @Servy makes sense because it's a method call, not an Expression representing the result. Since the provider generally barfs on method calls but a method is required for abstraction do you think it would work to use the method I wrote but instead of putting the method calls in the query, define expression vars outside of the query that contain the different method calls and reference those vars inside the query? Not pretty, but solves the duplication of logic issue. – moarboilerplate Dec 17 '14 at 17:37
  • That's exactly what the OP is trying to do, but he's failing to accomplish that, which is unsurprising, because it's not a trivial task to accomplish. If you wrote an answer that actually did that, and did it in such a way that the final query results in an expression that the query provider can understand (namely that it's indistinguishable from the OP's working query) then you should post it. – Servy Dec 17 '14 at 17:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.